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Day 11: Spatchcock Chicken (and Artisan Bread)


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Nothing super fancy tonight: I had to work from the office today, so didn't have the time during the middle of the day to prep or plan as much. I knew this was going to be my cook tonight, so I pulled a whole chicken from the freezer before I left this morning and set it in the fridge to thaw. 

 

Spatchcocked it and flattened it, put a whole lot of butter under the skin, and sprinkled it with Penzey's lemon pepper. Btw, when I spatch my chickens, I cut down one side of the back bone, rather than cutting out the whole backbone as most instructions say to. The back is one of the best parts to use for making homemade chicken stock, so having the roasted backbone makes my chicken lie a little lopsided and slightly less flat, but it's worth it for the homemade stock!

 

On the grill at about 425° (diffuser on the lower rack with a layer of foil over).

 
 
Off the rack 45 mins later (and put on a handful of halved baby zucchini)
 
 
Served over a bed of parmesan cous cous (cooked in chicken stock with italian seasoning and parmesan cheese), and the baby zucchini. 
 
 
 
I knew I wanted to use the residual heat to bake the artisan bread that has been rising on the counter all today, so I prepped that while the baby zucchini were cooking. Into the small cast iron skillet, brushed with oil, and sprinkled with gray fleur de sel. 
 
 
Pictures of that still to come. :)
 
 
 
 
Edited by karacooks
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Ben - just your basic 100/60/2 ratio for bread. I used:

 

500g flour 

300g water

10g yeast

10g kosher salt

 

Mixed and kneaded it this morning, let it rise on the counter all day, punched it down and let it rise in the pan while I was cooking dinner, and it's in the grill now. 

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Oh CC. *shaking head*

 

g = grams. Good baking is always done by weight, not by volume. And grams allow you to be perfectly accurate with your ratios.

 

A basic artisan bread is 100% flour / 60% water / 2% yeast / 2% salt (some say 3% yeast, but whatever floats your boat).

 

So:

500g flour 

60% of that is 300g (water)

2% of it is 10g (yeast and salt, each)

 

And here it is after about 1:15 in a hot grill:

 

 

 

I probably should have given it a longer second rise, but I was impatient! :) 

Edited by karacooks
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Thanks @magician!  Your dad and I would have to wrestle for the back. I go through gallons of chicken stock each month. I NEED my homemade stock. :) 

 

And the only reason I don't weigh 800# is that I force myself to lift weights and run. Otherwise I'd have to stop eating and that just ain't gonna happen!! 

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