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I used gas for years then found pellet smokers. I've been smoking with pellets for 6 years and love it. My daughter grew up, moved to Ohio and got married. Now she misses my smoked food. Since pellet smokers cost so much to run I knew that that wouldn't be a good choice for them. I did my research and found the Acorn at Lowes. After I had all the options pros and cons I got with my new son and said I'll splurge for a smoker for you'll in this range. I told him pros and cons of gas(with smoke box), indirect charcoal, stick, electric, and the Acorn. He asked if he could have some time to decide. Although I wanted to get it then and try it out (I figured he'd decide on the Acorn or the electric Masterbuilt ) I knew I would do the same thing so I said take time to research and decide. Alas I had to fly home before he decided. As you can guess, as soon as I arrived home I got word he had done the research and has decided on the Acorn. Since they will be moving soon I told them lets wait till they actually move so the unit doesn't have to go through a move needlessly.

 

I'm glad I found this site and will be telling him. If it weren't for the fact that I cook a case of butts at a time a couple times a year for church socials I'd be tempted to swap my pellet in. Don't fret though cause I may get one later anyway for the high searing ability for steaks and pizza I hear this thing is great for. I can't wait to hear what they say after they get it and start smoking. This is the kind of smoke she will like to smell.

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I used gas for years then found pellet smokers. I've been smoking with pellets for 6 years and love it. My daughter grew up, moved to Ohio and got married. Now she misses my smoked food. Since pellet smokers cost so much to run I knew that that wouldn't be a good choice for them. I did my research and found the Acorn at Lowes. After I had all the options pros and cons I got with my new son and said I'll splurge for a smoker for you'll in this range. I told him pros and cons of gas(with smoke box), indirect charcoal, stick, electric, and the Acorn. He asked if he could have some time to decide. Although I wanted to get it then and try it out (I figured he'd decide on the Acorn or the electric Masterbuilt ) I knew I would do the same thing so I said take time to research and decide. Alas I had to fly home before he decided. As you can guess, as soon as I arrived home I got word he had done the research and has decided on the Acorn. Since they will be moving soon I told them lets wait till they actually move so the unit doesn't have to go through a move needlessly.

 

I'm glad I found this site and will be telling him. If it weren't for the fact that I cook a case of butts at a time a couple times a year for church socials I'd be tempted to swap my pellet in. Don't fret though cause I may get one later anyway for the high searing ability for steaks and pizza I hear this thing is great for. I can't wait to hear what they say after they get it and start smoking. This is the kind of smoke she will like to smell.

Welcome, and glad you have joined the conversation!  Can't wait to hear what your daughter/son-in-law think of the Akorn!

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Response to bosco0633. I did a lot of research and did the best I could. I told him that it was insulated and according to reports I read it held the temps well. The reports said it could smoke or sear with temps up to 700F. I told him that from what I read except for electric it would use the least amount of fuel of any cooker. The fact he could use charcoal or lump was big too. I agreed if he wanted to do the research himself that would be best. The one definite drawback I told him of was limited amount of cooking space. I had seen 1 post of someone cooking 3 pork butts and wasn't sure if he could do a 3 cryo pack of ribs or not but that 2 shouldn't be a problem. The other possible drawback I saw is that he may need to babysit the vent more than on the electric or electronic pellet. Turns out the IQ110 and 120 would apparently solve that issue. I told him that I had never owned one but that is what I had read. I have owned gas, charcoal backyard, pellet and recently had experience with electric. I gave him the best + and - that I could for all types. After doing his own research he thought the Acorn would be the best choice. From what I've read so far I tend to agree unless you never want to go to the store for fuel then the electric would be best if cost of fuel is a major concern. If cooking capacity (ie: a case of pork butts or whole hog) is the main concern then none of the Kamatos or electric I've seen would be the ticket. I hope that answers your question and that I did a good enough job explaining the pros and cons of the Acorn to him.

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^^ I think you misunderstood my post. Reading it back I should have been clearer. I meant how can you give him advice without having one for you to use lol. It was my plug to get you to get one!!!!!

I think you are doing a great job on your research and wish I had a father in law like you.

Sorry for the confusion

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  • 2 weeks later...

Update on my daughter/new son and their Akorn. A local store had some on sale but we were afraid that they would be sold out by the time they got into their new place. Decided to go ahead and get it now. They decided to keep it in the box for easy moving. Wait, we need to be sure everything is there and not broken or dented. Everything looks good, no damages, gee wonder how well this works.... You guessed it, within a week of looking at the box it was put together and a small (5lb) pork butt was smoking. Alas I think he had his vents a tad too open or lite too many spots. He said the temp started out fine then went to 350 according to the dome. I found this out after 3 hours in. I reminded them the domes are notoriously off. I suggested they temp the butt now. The result 206F, I asked if they tested a couple place and center of cut and they said yes. Take it off and rest a little but close all vents.

 

They used some meat pullers and said they worked great and the meat was G-R-E-A-T. They couldn't believe how much lump was left after the cook at the temps it had gotten too. Even my 9 month old grandson couldn't get enough of it. He comes by it naturally as when his mom was a week old we were having ham (from the oven I hadn't gotten smart yet). She kept looking at me eating it rather intently. I figured why not let her try it. So I cut a piece and speared it with my fork. Then I put it to her lips and she sucked on it turning the pink looking ham to white. I was curious, I ate it and she had literally gotten all the flavor out of that hunk of meat. Needless to say they are happy, happy happy with it . Can't wait to hear what else they do with it and how many other Kamado style converts they create with it.

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