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Sparkey

Caster Disasters?

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I got a new Vision grill last month and after assembling, one of the first things I noticed while I was pushing it outside was moving the Classic B could be a bit of a challenge.  The massive weight of the grill and the small expansion gap in the concrete between my garage and driveway conspired to stop the 2" caster wheels dead in their tracks and almost tip the whole thing over.  OK, so I learned to move more slowly, pull the grill gently from the hinge on the back and lift slightly when crossing uneven surfaces ... this seems to help.  Now I'm thinking about fixing the problem by upgrading the casters to a more robust 4" urethane wheel like the one shown below.  The theory is the larger radius plus the softer tire will dramatically improve the situation and simply glide across the roughest terrain.

 

Anyone had this problem before and found a solution?

 

$_35.JPG

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The small wheels are a problem for me too since I have patio stones. I usually don't move it far because of it, just a. Few feet here and ther, and generally try to pull from the cradle itself instead of the grill, though sometimes I also i use the shelf brackets. The larger wheels would definitely help. The larger the better, but the bigger the wheels the higher the grill and the higher the center of gravity. I think the ideal solution would be to build a cart where you can take the wheels off the grill cart and sit it on this other platform with wheels, where the platform height would be at the mid-point in the wheels so that it's not too tall and also you don't need to worry about retrofitting new wheels onto the current cart.

That being said I have never tried to do it, just brainstorming. :)

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I don't have stones, and the cement is somewhat smooth, but I do have some expansion joints. My biggest concern with my Vision, after having it on the patio for going on three years now is just the durability of the nest. It shows signs of light rust in certain spots, but seems pretty solid. It is holding a great deal of weight, so I guess I'm just hopeful that it continues to support it as time goes by. 

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 I also would recommend at least 3" rubber casters.  I'm planning on making a table soon.  If the table is massive or have a concrete or granite top you should definitely go with at least 4".  Pneumatic wheels are also a good alternative as Remoh pointed out.  I usually get them cheap at Harbor Freight, also occasionaly on clearance at a local Woodcraft store.  Good luck with your project!

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Thanks to all for the advice, it sounds like we've got some engineers out there (Fire Tender).  A more permanent tabletop could be in the long term plans but in the mean time I think I'll try the larger casters and see how they work.  I'll let you know how it works out.

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My BGE experienced a Humpty Dumpty moment on my uncle's driveway due to the exact reason you are asking about. He gave me the shattered remains and I fixed it up again which is how I came to own a kamado.

 Just curious what did you use to glue it back together?

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My BGE experienced a Humpty Dumpty moment on my uncle's driveway due to the exact reason you are asking about. He gave me the shattered remains and I fixed it up again which is how I came to own a kamado.

Just curious what did you use to glue it back together?
I used a special glue called "$800". After using $800 the grill looked almost brand new.

I know, I know, it wasn't worth it cost wise, but this is probably the only thing I'll every inherit from my great uncle who is more like a grandfather to me, so the sentimental value is priceless. The lid and stand were intact, the wood shelves were smashed, and the main base and fire box were busted. I also bought a plate setter which it didn't have originally and a couple other things so realistically it probably cost me around $700 to put it back like it was before the "great fall".

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OK so I installed the new slicks on my Vision Classic and am really pleased with the outcome.  They look like they were made for the unit and they vastly improved the mobility; the kamado now glides across concrete joints like Michelle Kwan skates on ice.

post-7006-0-87452200-1414960737_thumb.jp

If you decide to try this yourself you need to know threaded stem casters used by Vision are metric -- 12mm X1.75 threads. Most casters sold in the US come with Imperial threads and they will not work with the Vision frame.  I bought casters on ebay with Imperial 1/2" X 13 threaded stems and simply replaced the bolts with the correct metric bolts I bought at Ace hardware for $5.  Worked fine.

post-7006-0-89305200-1414961701_thumb.jppost-7006-0-15191300-1414961722_thumb.jp

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I think they're zinc-plated mild steel, but not sure.  I picked em up on ebay, two locking casters and two non-locking:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/221565939241?_trksid=p2060778.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/221571420242?_trksid=p2060778.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

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