Jump to content

Heat Diffusers/Deflectors


Recommended Posts

Everyone that has a good "seal" on their Akorn and can hold the low temperatures for long periods of time 225°F and below, please post what size and type of diffuser u are using be it 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 "or square pizza pan, water pan, cookie sheet, pizza stone (size-thickness), foiled rack, the actual Akorn smoking stone or whatever just to get an idea what is working and what's not! I realize there are lots of other factors at play here but I am very curious about this one!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a large cast iron griddle that I have had for some time. I put it on a grill grate intended as a charcoal grate for a 22.5 inch weber kettle. I find it to be just a bit too large so I am planning to try and use an angle grinder to reduce it's diameter about 2 inches. Never tried to "cut" cast iron with an angle grinder so we will see. If it shatters I will probably just go buy a ceramic diffuser made for the Akorn.

 

I have sealed my lid, air intake, and ash catcher with nomex (instructions found elsewhere on this site). I light my charcoal using the "volcano" method with cotton balls soaked in alcohol, let it come to about 170 degrees then close the air intake completely and open the top vent completely. I can stay between 225 and 250 all night like this. If that is too hot I close the top vent just a bit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My mods:  

 

This is the pizza stone I use.  I wrap in foil to keep it from soaking up drippings. 2 years old, no cracks or blemishes.  I sit it right on top of the 19" weber replacement grate. 

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000E1FDB/ref=pe_228660_24344220_email_r_im

 

I sealed my bottom vent using epoxy putty wrapped just around the hole under the vent assembly.  Nomex tape would have worked just fine, but I had this stuff.  

 

I sealed the ash pan with Red RTV gasket sealant around the seams and nomex felt tape attached with a thin layer of 5 minute epoxy.

 

The lid has a nomex felt tape on the bottom and the factory seal on top.

 

I built a lump basket from spread steel mesh, attached to the bottom grate.  

 

I also use a PartyQ temp controller - If you can afford any temp controller, get it - you'll thank me.  If you stack your lump properly, once you get it stabilized you can walk away for hours or go to sleep without worrying about the thing getting out of control or going out.

 

once the partyq adapter was installed, I sealed it using nomex tape.  No air gets in that doesn't come through the PQ fan.

 

hth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe I have better control with the smokin stone over cheap pizza stone and as fas as a cheap stone breaks it has paid for itself.. But with that being said the startup process, arrangement of charcoal and how much charcoal you have lit far far outweigh the diffuser in running 225 and below. . 

 

If you seriously wanna run 225 or below which IMO just wastes time other than jerky, fish or bacon.. Take a bag of lump, smash it on the concrete like a bag of ice.. Breaks it in to small pieces.. Put it in a kamado, use chips instead of chunks.. The really small charcoal pieces coupled with the chips restricts airflow and thus enables one to easily attain lower temps.. 

 

Everytime I dump the last of a bag in the kamado I have my vent settings much more open than normal as all the "fines" fill in the holes restricting airflow. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First off, I agree with icedturks and toe. I prefer 250 - 275.

But with that being said, the are times where a lower temp is called for (mostly when I want to put it on before I go to bed, instead of getting up at 3 am.)

I have the akorn stone, but prefer the weber replacement charcoal grate wrapped in foil.

It is big enough that I actually think it helps keep the temp down by restricting the air flow. I might be wrong about that, but it sure seems that way to me.

Sometimes I poke holes near the edge of the foil to let the drippings reach the coals.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the akorn stone, but prefer the weber replacement charcoal grate wrapped in foil.

It is big enough that I actually think it helps keep the temp down by restricting the air flow. I might be wrong about that, but it sure seems that way to me.

Sometimes I poke holes near the edge of the foil to let the drippings reach the coals.

The reason for a diffuser is to stabilize and even out the temp throughout the kamado and eliminate any possible hot spots from food sitting directly above the hot coals.

If you have to rely on the diffuser to restrict the air flow something else is wrong. Vent settings and a properly sized fire is what is used to control air flow and temp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a cake pan with the center cut out large enough to drop a wood chunk through it.  The hole is about the size of a can of tuna, and the cake pan is 15" diameter.  At first I was using sand in the pan covered in foil, the sand was added for thermal mass and the foil was added for easy clean-up and to protect the sand from grease drippings. 

When I decided to cut the hole out to allow me to add wood through it, I decided to try it without the sand and have stuck with it, for me I wasn't seeing much difference with or without the thermal mass, but some others like it.

 

I cut a hole through the center of my grate to allow access for the wood as well, although you can obviously just use the removable center piece on the Akorn grate if you don't mind the extra step, which I did.

 

The cake pan setup is strictly for low/slow cooks for me now.

 

For regular grilling, I'm using the aluminum sheets cut out to fit under the grill grate.  These prevent flare-ups but still allow plenty of heat through to get nice grill marks, etc.  This was a big upgrade to me, over grilling with the cake pan diffuser, or grilling with no diffuser, sort of the best of both worlds.

So on regular grilling, I have no cake pan diffuser or weber grate b/w the coals and the top grate, just the aluminum sheets at grate level. 

Of course I can still drop a chunk or chips in right through the middle of the grate when I need them this way as well. 

 

 

post-6195-0-87100200-1415195138_thumb.jp

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I have the akorn stone, but prefer the weber replacement charcoal grate wrapped in foil.

It is big enough that I actually think it helps keep the temp down by restricting the air flow. I might be wrong about that, but it sure seems that way to me.

Sometimes I poke holes near the edge of the foil to let the drippings reach the coals.

The reason for a diffuser is to stabilize and even out the temp throughout the kamado and eliminate any possible hot spots from food sitting directly above the hot coals.

If you have to rely on the diffuser to restrict the air flow something else is wrong. Vent settings and a properly sized fire is what is used to control air flow and temp.

 

I agree whole 100%. Perhaps I explained myself wrong. I don't rely on the diffuser to restrict air flow. But it just seems to me, on my grill, it is easier to keep the temp down under 225 or 200 when I use that set up. I assume it is because there are less gaps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I have the akorn stone, but prefer the weber replacement charcoal grate wrapped in foil.

It is big enough that I actually think it helps keep the temp down by restricting the air flow. I might be wrong about that, but it sure seems that way to me.

Sometimes I poke holes near the edge of the foil to let the drippings reach the coals.

The reason for a diffuser is to stabilize and even out the temp throughout the kamado and eliminate any possible hot spots from food sitting directly above the hot coals.

If you have to rely on the diffuser to restrict the air flow something else is wrong. Vent settings and a properly sized fire is what is used to control air flow and temp.

 

I agree whole 100%. Perhaps I explained myself wrong. I don't rely on the diffuser to restrict air flow. But it just seems to me, on my grill, it is easier to keep the temp down under 225 or 200 when I use that set up. I assume it is because there are less gaps.

 

 

 

Just be careful.. Back when this forum was just getting started I remember folks trying larger and larger diffusers.. If I remember correctly an some long term members can probably say yay or nay but some folks had so much diffuser they held so much heat down around the ashpan they ran into problems:melting handles, warping, paint etc.. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

I have the akorn stone, but prefer the weber replacement charcoal grate wrapped in foil.

It is big enough that I actually think it helps keep the temp down by restricting the air flow. I might be wrong about that, but it sure seems that way to me.

Sometimes I poke holes near the edge of the foil to let the drippings reach the coals.

The reason for a diffuser is to stabilize and even out the temp throughout the kamado and eliminate any possible hot spots from food sitting directly above the hot coals.

If you have to rely on the diffuser to restrict the air flow something else is wrong. Vent settings and a properly sized fire is what is used to control air flow and temp.

 

I agree whole 100%. Perhaps I explained myself wrong. I don't rely on the diffuser to restrict air flow. But it just seems to me, on my grill, it is easier to keep the temp down under 225 or 200 when I use that set up. I assume it is because there are less gaps.

 

 

 

Just be careful.. Back when this forum was just getting started I remember folks trying larger and larger diffusers.. If I remember correctly an some long term members can probably say yay or nay but some folks had so much diffuser they held so much heat down around the ashpan they ran into problems:melting handles, warping, paint etc.. 

 

Good to know, I could totally see that happening. Thank You.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Tom_V
      First cook on Joetissorie on the Akorn, and yes it fits perfect! I used a combination rub of KC's and Dinasour BBQ Cajun Foreplay. (Dinasour BBQ is the BEST BBQ restaurant in NY State) I also made a paste with same ingredients and rubbed under breast skin and inside cavity. Akorn running at 400-425 deg. Amazing flavor!



       
       
    • By Cranky1
      Hi all,
      Just got an Akorn 16820 and mother nature decided to go all cool and wet on me. Looking forward to trying this thing out.
    • By Millerb7
      So I have myself an Akorn for about 4 years. Through a couple moves while building a new house, it was pretty neglected... sat outside, uncovered through winter, rain, etc. Needless to say due to the metal build, it rusted something bad. I ended up getting rid of it and decided I'd see what the Weber Kettle hype was all about. I picked myself up Kettle Master Touch.......... wow...
       
      I freaking hated it. Was horrible to keep temps. Took forever to get up to temp. Was terrible to use with lump (as it fell through the grates)... just a bad overall experience. Cooked on it about 4 times then sold it. Now... I live in a VERY windy area. Like 10-15 mph winds almost constantly.... so I'm sure that played a part... but it was no enjoyable.
       
      I decided to pick myself up a new Kamado Joe Classic from Lowes for $650..... I'm in love.
    • By Tarnation
      I joined this forum last year not long after getting my Char Griller Akorn used.  I love that little steel beauty, but I've had ceramic fever and been seeing them all over the place the past year.  Costco was about to have me parting with $600 for the Louisiana Grills 24" Kamado (just another rebranded Auplex like Vision), but my dad who works for a hardware store told me the owner wanted to sell off the stores XL Egg since they didn't really use it.  I got what I think is a great deal on this beauty, paid less for this than you would for a stripped out XL with no accessories and definitely less than a Costco roadshow Big Joe.  Came with the table, ConvEggtor, ash tool, and grate gripper.  They couldn't locate the ceramic cap when we brought it home, but I'm sure it'll turn up.  It's under an awning anyway and I'll be getting a cover to further protect it.  
       
      To be fair to the Akorn it is a fantastic cooker!  Just since the apocalypse started, I've done at least one decent cook a week on it.  I've done ribs at least 3 times, pork butt, brisket, a turkey, soda can chickens, wings, steaks, and various veggies for sides.  I absolutely do not regret the Akorn purchase.  If you're unsure if kamado bbqing is right for you the Akorn is a fantastic place to start, it's relatively cheap and a good design.  I've been eyeballing the extra space the  Big Joe and the XL Egg offer and ultimately couldn't resist.  Just judging by my short not even 1 year of ownership I doubt my Egg will cook any better than the Akorn.  This was purely a decision based on the total cooking surface and potential cooking surface with mods.  I've done 3 racks of ribs on my Akorn before, but it gets tight and those were baby backs no easy way to get that many spare rib racks on there.  2 upright soda can (beer can) chickens really pushes the limit with my probes contacting the dome.  
       
      TLDR; just wanted to brag on my Eggscellent deal and write a love letter to my Akorn.  I'm hoping this will be the last grill I ever have to buy, not saying I won't want to buy more, but this should be with me a long long time.  I wish I could keep the Akorn, but I have 3 grills now and between the 22" Weber Kettle and the Akorn, I can probably get more for the used Akorn.  If you're in the market for a well used Akorn, but still in fine cooking shape and you're in the Jacksonville, FL area, hit me up.

    • By Daz
      Have been busy with my other toy projects so the pellet Akorn has been cold for a while. Today kids want to eat pizza so I fired up the pellets akorn. It heats up to 500+ degrees in less than 10 min and the pizza was perfect. I fitted a WiFi PID controller and was going to tweak the algorithm but...too many projects! 
      Right now the temperature overshoots 50-80 degrees if set below 300 degrees, but gets better as it goes higher. 
      Anyway here is the pizza and the good looking grill haha.



×
×
  • Create New...