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Kamado K7 Restoration

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Welcome, glad to have you with us, and look forward to your restoration project posts. Just my two cents, but I wouldn't put my kamado on it's side during transport. Kamados are made to stand up right and on their bases. To lay it on it's side, I am thinking, would apply pressure from a direction it is not designed for. Again, just my two cents. 

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Welcome to the addiction! I agree with Keeper, above, the Kamados are best transported upright. IIRC, the original owner

of the K7 at the beginning of this thread used to transport it in a low profile, fully enclosed small trailer with a ramp at the

back. Removing the lid and inner parts would make it easier to handle and give it a lower profile for transporting. Good luck

with your "new" Kamado.

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If it were mine, I would set it flat on a folded blanket with a thickness of an inch or two to form a soft but firm base. I would put card board wedges in the gaps of the internal ceramic parts, or remove them entirely and transport them outside individually wrapped. I would wrap the kamado in a few layers of plastic wrap to hold the lid and kettle firmly and make it impossible for them to bang together during the ride ( I would lay a piece of cardboard between the lid and kettle and seal it tight with plastic wrap) . If you want over kill you can  then wrap the kamado in bubble wrap before you lash it down with bungee cords. Best of luck transporting your new prize.  

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1 hour ago, keeperovdeflame said:

If it were mine, I would set it flat on a folded blanket with a thickness of an inch or two to form a soft but firm base. I would put card board wedges in the gaps of the internal ceramic parts, or remove them entirely and transport them outside individually wrapped. I would wrap the kamado in a few layers of plastic wrap to hold the lid and kettle firmly and make it impossible for them to bang together during the ride ( I would lay a piece of cardboard between the lid and kettle and seal it tight with plastic wrap) . If you want over kill you can  then wrap the kamado in bubble wrap before you lash it down with bungee cords. Best of luck transporting your new prize.  

 

Thanks for the replies, all.  I did initially consider transporting it upright, but the question of how to strap it down so as to not allow it to tip or slide seemed difficult.  I don't know, but it seems that wrapping straps around the circumference of the base would possibly exert forces around the diameter that could cause cracks?  That's why I was thinking of lying it vertically on a mattress, with some type of support on either side to keep it from rolling around.  I would stuff the inside full with towels/blankets/plastic/paper/etc to counteract the downward forces.  The internal components will be removed, and the lid will be taken off, so the items coming into contact shouldn't be an issue.

But, I guess this same idea may be applicable to the problem of wrapping the tow straps around the outside.  if I pack the inside full enough, it may be enough to allow me to wrap straps around the outside and secure it.  At the same time, I wonder if that would suffice with keeping it from rolling, unless I can some how take the casters off of the bottom.

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@coferj - please make certain you transport your kamado vertically, not laid down horizontally.  Cylinders (a vertical kamado) withstand MUCH more stress than do hoops (a horizontal kamado).  This is why a hotdog always split longitudinally.  This is also why pipes burst along their length.  It's called hoop stress.  Laying your kamado down (not stood vertically as it would be in its stand/table) is a very dangerous thing to do.  One bump and the kamado is done for.  Stood on end, you won't need to stuff anything inside the kamado.  Stuffing your horizontal kamado with towles, papers, plastic, etc. won't help with hoop stress.  Just stand you kamado on end and you'll be quite safe.

 

Best of luck!

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A good example of what CC is saying is found looking at  the bands on your kamado which hold the hinge assembly for the kettle and  dome. They fit around the circumference  of the kettle and dome. With my BGE, sufficient band tightening actually bends the bolts that pinch the bands together. I asked the BGE rep once, if I could over tighten the bands and break the ceramic. He said with confidence, you would definitely snap the bands before you break the kettle. What kind of vehicle are you going to be transporting the K7 in. In my truck I simply loop tie straps around the kettle and hook one to the right side and one to the left side of the bed. When the straps are tight enough, my kamado ins't going anywhere. 

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@CeramicChef You and @keeperovdeflame seem to know a bit about these things.  How would be best to strap it down, if loaded vertically?  It's on wheels, and I'm not sure if they will remove or not. I don't want to hook to the lip of the kettle, as that doesn't seem too safe to be pulling outward on it.  Being that it's a cylinder that decreases toward the bottom, straps won't exactly stay in place, and would just slide down to the base.

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There are a couple of things you can do, and CC probably has a couple of more. One if you wrap your tie straps around the kettle with one going out to a tie down on either side of  your vehicle, you can keep them from slipping down  by putting a tie down that loops under each tie down and then runs over the top of the kettle. Kinda like a figure eight looping under the ties downs on each side and crossing and tightened as it runs across the top of your kettle beneath your dome. I would think that would keep them from slipping down. 

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@coferj - I tend to agree with @keeperovdeflame in the post above.  If this kamado is on wheels, get it out and away from the wheels.  You want to restrict the degrees of freedom as much as possible.  I'd say that 300 pounds on wheels is nothing I would want to mess with, especially with such a high center of gravity.  Get some help and get this kamado on a flat surface.  Go find a heavy shipping pallet, put the kamado upright on it, and strap it down with ratchet straps.  If you leave this thing on wheels you're an accident looking for a place to happen.  Rent a pickup, borrow a pallet, get some ratchet straps, and you'll be fine.  I'd use something like 4 ratchet straps across the kamado for a total of 8 points of security.

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According to RJ's website, that K7 weighs in at ~550 pounds. You might think about renting a box truck

with a power lift tail gate to transport the K7. Lots of other good advice above for protecting the K.

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My K7 was disassembled, with the dome removed for transport.  The three bolts which secure the band were removed first.  Before removing the dome, it was lifted a couple of inches with boards between the body and the dome to wedge it open, and then the dogs (locking nuts) on the springs locked.  Then the bolt which cinched the band together was removed. The dome was carefully lifted away and set aside on wooden blocks (so you can get your fingers under it to lift it).  After transport, the process was reversed.  The three bolts which hold the lower and upper band should be replaced with good quality stainless 3/8 inch bolts.

 

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Since the K7 was disassembled, it's not that complicated to load it in the vehicle. You can also use towing truck parts if you have a trailer to help you transport it easily. By the way, any updates about it.

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