Jump to content

BEER-N-BBQ by Larry

Roasted Garlic & Rosemary Bread

Recommended Posts

I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum (http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15812-sourdough-yeast-starter/).

 

Ingredients:
15 oz (wt) Bread Flour
About a cup of Bread Yeast Starter (<--  link to video)
1 bulb Roasted Garlic (wrapped in oil & foil @ 400 deg F for 30 minutes)
2 large fresh Rosemarey Sprigs (minced)
1/2 Tbsp Salt
1 tsp Olive Oil
1 tsp Molasses
About 2-3 oz (wt) Water or more depending on thickness of Starter

 

This is the slideshow version:

 

 

This is the picture by picture version:

 

1) The day before, pull your yeast starter from the fridge, feed it, and let it warm/build up.

DSC_3598.JPG

 

2) The night before, make a sponge starter.  Add 5 oz (wt) Bread Flour, 1 cup yeast starter, and about 2-3 oz water to bowl and mix well.  The sponge should have wet medium consistency. Add water/four as necessary.

DSC_3601.JPG

DSC_3603.JPG

 

3) Next morning, the sponge should be ready.

DSC_3605.JPG

 

4) Roast the garlic, let it cool and squeeze out the soft aromatic cloves into the bowl with the rest of the ingredients.

DSC_3610.JPG

DSC_3611.JPG

 

5) Mix and knead on stand mixer with dough hook for 10 minutes. Add flour or water as necessary to achive a dough ball that doesn't stick to the bowl.

 

6) Form into round ball and place in oiled bowl.  Cover.

DSC_3612.JPG

 

7) Let rise all day.  Punch down a couple times if necessary.

 

8) Form into desired shape (a baguette loaf this time).

DSC_3613.JPG

 

9) Let rise until doublish in size.  In the meantime, fire up the kamado indirectly to about 450 deg F.  Cut diagonal breaks in the top of the loaf and spritz with water spray bottle.

DSC_3614.JPG

 

10) Place loaf on kamado. Cook for 25-30 minutes or until done. Remove and let cool.

DSC_3616.JPG

 

11) Slice it up and serve with sauce of olive oil, parmesan, oregano, and black pepper.

DSC_3618.JPG

DSC_3619.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum.

 

http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15226-roasted-garlic-rosemary-bread

 

Larry, I'd like to keep both of these in the recipe section... could you post the ingredients and instruction lists with each?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum.

 

http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15226-roasted-garlic-rosemary-bread

 

Larry, I'd like to keep both of these in the recipe section... could you post the ingredients and instruction lists with each?

 

Sure, John.  Just did it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks terrific. I am trying to figure out how I can make this with the overnight artisan method. I roast garlic all the time and have it in the freezer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks terrific. I am trying to figure out how I can make this with the overnight artisan method. I roast garlic all the time and have it in the freezer.

What's the artisan method, and how does it differ from my yeast starter to sponge starter to full loaf method?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The artisan method I am talking about is no starter but the 5 minute flour water salt and yeast. Mix all together with water and leave 8 hours to overnight on the counter. I will try your method when I can get my rear in gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just tried this recipe and it had wonderful flavor!! I think I missed a little on the rise though. It was slightly denser than I expected. After pulling from the mixer bowl, I just let it rise all a day ~8 hours. It had doubled already. After forming into a loaf it rose some more. Should I have formed the loaf earlier? Or should I have let rise after forming loaf longer?

 

I am new to bread baking... This recipe is actually one of the inspirations for giving it a shot :-) Thank you for sharing @BEER-N-BBQ by Larry !!

 

Also, I assumed the 5 oz wt of bread flour for the starter was part of the 15 oz total. Was that right? 

 

Thanks again!

IMG_0162.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. Part of the total.
There are many reasons for a poor final rise:
1. Weak yeast
2. The year ran out of food. The initial rise may have went too long. Should be double in size before reforming.
3. Didn't sit long enough to rise.
4. Oven temp is too low. The first ten minutes of baking at least should be at least 450 deg.
5. The skin set before it could rise fully in The oven. Cause:. The oven was too dry. Next time spray some water in the oven initially and at the five minute point to keep steam in the oven long enough to prong the outside firming up.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, BEER-N-BBQ by Larry said:

Yes. Part of the total.
There are many reasons for a poor final rise:
1. Weak yeast
2. The year ran out of food. The initial rise may have went too long. Should be double in size before reforming.
3. Didn't sit long enough to rise.
4. Oven temp is too low. The first ten minutes of baking at least should be at least 450 deg.
5. The skin set before it could rise fully in The oven. Cause:. The oven was too dry. Next time spray some water in the oven initially and at the five minute point to keep steam in the oven long enough to prong the outside firming up.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thanks for the pointers! 

It had been doubled for several hours before I formed the loaf, and probably sat for another 45 min - 1 hr, while the grill came up to temp. It did expand some after forming but I guess it was a mix of 2 and 3 you mentioned. 

 

I'll try again soon and keep an eye on 4 and 5 too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



  • Similar Content

    • By philpom
      "Pickled" Dill Bread
       
      1 cup of water + 1 tbs
      1/3 cup of white vinegar
      4 cups of all purpose flour
      1/4 cup of potato flakes
      4 1/2 tbs white sugar
      2 1/2 tbs powder milk
      2 tsp kosher salt
      3 tbs butter
      4 tsp instant dry yeast
      1 heaping tbs dill seed.

      Combine according to your bread machine instructions. Mine says add fluid, flour, other - being certain the yeast does not come in contact with any water.

      Use the knead/dough only quick cycle. Once the cycle is completed remove the dough ball and form a "log" blob. Have a pre-warmed pizza stone ready with a heating pad underneath set to high to keep it warm. The stone should be a gentle warm and not hot. Place a large clear bowl over the dough and allow an additional 1 to 1 1/2 hours to rise. I put some cornmeal on the stone to help prevent sticking.

      Place in the kamado preheated to 350 degrees setup for indirect cooking and bake for about 50 minutes or until the loaf sounds hollow when you tap on it.

      Cut and serve - be sure to try it still warm with butter!

      Look at this topic for some picture of what it might look like:
      viewtopic.php?f=10&t=2819
    • By St1brew
      My very first attempt at bread was from a box. I did want it to be easy and quick as I felt I was dipping my toe into the baking water. So here is the box we used.
       

      Very easy to make just add water and let it rise for 45 minutes to an hour.
      Get the grill up to 400f and on it goes for 25 to 30 minutes

       
      Put it on a greased pizza pan on the top rack, I wish I had thrown it on a sheet of parchment. I did get some light sticking to pan when I checked it at the 20 minute mark.
      This is how it looked pulled after 30 minutes.

      Second pic you can see where the sticking occurred...
      Served it up with some homemade Scottish cabbage stew that the misses made last night. If you've never had, it is wonderful and very easy to make also it comes from a local restaurant(we know a lady who used to work there). I can post the recipe if anyone is interested. It's basically cabbage, carrots hot sausage and chicken stock topped up with cheese and served with(you guessed it) a big ole hunk of bread! Here's the dinner pick.

      My wife also put together a peach cobbler that she asked if it could be grilled as well, to which I replied; I'll give it a shot!
      Peaches, cinnamon, a dash of nutmeg, butter, brown sugar, and rolled oats. Mix cinnamon and nutmeg with peaches until well coated. Put them into pan. Slice a stick of butter into 1'' pads and put on top of peaches. Sprinkle an even coating of brown sugar to cover all peaches, then oats on top to cover. Put into grill at 400f and take off when browned on top. Pretty sure you could use any fruit in the world and it would turn out amazing. We have also done the same recipe but added bourbon into the fruit, this is awesome as well. 
       

      On the grill!

      Finished! Awesome and easy! May try a more challenging bread recipe soon.
       

    • By CentralTexBBQ
      Cooked a brisket for our Church Brunch (Roasted chicken, brisket, candied sweet potatoes, green beans, mac & cheese). Started it 9pm and wrapped it in butcher paper the last hour to get it off by 9am. Granted this is an extremely horrible brisket pic but, after two long shifts and basically no sleep, I was incapable of properly operating a camera. I did discover that I can basically cook a brisket sleepwalking however. 
       

       
      The Macaroni Grill style bread
       

       
      leftovers for today's breakfast.
       

    • By John Setzler
      Here's a really simple loaf that has the added flavor benefit of a poolish....
       
      Overall recipe ingredients:
       
      425g Bread Flour
      320g Water
      8.5g salt
      7g yeast
       
      The technique I used here was to make a poolish from 75g of the overall flour and 100g of the overall water.  Instead of just a pinch of active dry yeast, I used 15g of my sourdough starter instead.  I mixed that up and let it do it's magic overnight for 12 hours.  
       
      Today, I combined that poolish with the rest of the water at 95 degrees the mixed in the rest of the ingredients and let the dough hook knead it for 10 minutes.  I shaped that into a dough ball and let it rise covered in a greased bowl for 90 minutes.  
       
      I took that out and shaped it into my cast iron loaf pan.  I let that rise for another 30 mintues.  
       
      I put it on the Kamado Joe at 475 degrees for 20 minutes with a foil cover and then uncovered for another 20 minutes...
       
       
    • By zero
      Hey guys, I posted this over the recipes forum a day or two ago, because it was the first forum on bread I could find using Tapatalk.  I then realized it was the wrong place for it, so I'm reposting here.
       
      A friend of mine bought Ken Forkish's book "Flour Water Salt Yeast" a little while ago, and after borrowing it for a short span I bought my own copy, and have had a blast baking bread following Ken's instructions.  I've tried a lot his recipes and have started making a few of my own creations using the techniques he teaches.
       
      However, whether I follow a recipe or go freestyle, something as beautiful as the first image always comes out black on the bottom.  I get mixed results in both the KJ and Akorn.  I think the best way I've found for baking in the KJ is with th deflector stones in place directly over the coals.  Only trouble with that is I have a hard time getting to and maintaining 475 degrees, especially with a ginormous Dutch oven in there.  I can get my Akorn to temp REAL fast, and then put the heat difuser in and let things simmer down, but the bottom always comes out scorched.  Again, only time I seem to get burning is when I use the Dutch oven.  Sad. 
       
      My Kamado Joe has been tied up with a pork butt this afternoon, so I fired up my Akorn for the first time in months to have a go. I recall having a little more success with bread on my Akorn (but I haven't done as much bread on my KJ yet - not knocking it), but on both this keeps happening, and I end up cutting off a good portion of the bottom crust.
       
      This particular loaf is about 80% whole wheat, 80% hydration, and is a hybrid levain (i.e. Sourdough), with 100 grams of my own started as well as 1/4 tsp instant yeast (yes, a relatively large amount, but it rises amazingly, which I love).
       
      Baking method: preheat kamado to ~500 with diffuser plate in place and rack above (no water pan), put a pizza steel for extra deflection on the rack, then the Dutch oven on the steel. Let it all warm up 10-20 minutes (maybe not the full amount, but seems to be hot enough), and then drop the loaf in and put the lid back on. Bake for 20 minutes, pull the lid, and then remove after another 5-10 minutes. This yielded the results above.
       
      I thought the lower stone and the steel would keep enough direct heat off the bottom of the bread, but doesn't appear too. The only time I've not burned it is when I've got it directly on a stone on the top rack (no Dutch oven), or in a pie pan on the upper rack of my Akorn (also no Dutch oven). I really want to keep the Dutch oven in place because that's supposedly what makes the bread split open on top. Is an Akorn even moist enough to get away without using it?
       
      Any thoughts and recommendations (and especially experience) is much appreciated. Thanks!


×
×
  • Create New...