• Announcements

    • John Setzler

      Site TOS/Guidelines Updated 5/2/2017   05/02/2017

      Please take a moment to review these rules detailed below. If you agree with them and wish to proceed with the registration, simply click the "Register" button below. To cancel this registration, simply hit the 'back' button on your browser.   IF YOU ARE COMING HERE TO POST A COMPLAINT ABOUT YOUR CUSTOMER SERVICE EXPERIENCE WITH ANY GRILL COMPANY OR ANY VENDOR AND HAVE NOT ESTABLISHED YOURSELF AS A PARTICIPANT ON THIS SITE, WE SUGGEST THAT YOU REFRAIN FROM MAKING THE POST.  IF YOU HAVE MADE LESS THAN 25 POSTS TO THIS FORUM, YOUR CUSTOMER SERVICE OR COMPANY COMPLAINT WILL LIKELY BE REMOVED FROM THE SITE AT THE DISCRETION OF THE MODERATORS AND ADMINISTRATOR.     THE IMPORTANT STUFF:   1. NO PROFANITY 2. NO PERSONALLY ABUSIVE BEHAVIOR 3. BE NICE.   Failure to adhere to these three basic rules can and will get you removed from this site.  You will get a verbal warning for a first offense.  After that you get suspended.  After that you get permanently suspended.  The decision of the administrator and moderators is final on any issues related to rules and behavior.   YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION: Personal information provided to the Kamado Guru website is NOT shared with any third party for any reason. EVER.    THE REST OF THE STUFF:

      Please remember that we are not responsible for any messages posted. We do not vouch for or warrant the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any message, and are not responsible for the contents of any message.

      The messages express the views of the author of the message, not necessarily the views of this bulletin board. Any user who feels that a posted message is objectionable is encouraged to contact us immediately by email. We have the ability to remove objectionable messages and we will make every effort to do so, within a reasonable time frame, if we determine that removal is necessary.

      You agree, through your use of this service, that you will not use this bulletin board to post any material which is knowingly false and/or defamatory, inaccurate, abusive, vulgar, hateful, harassing, obscene, profane, sexually oriented, threatening, invasive of a person's privacy, or otherwise violative of any law.

      You agree not to post any copyrighted material unless the copyright is owned by you or by this bulletin board.

      Our websites use cookies to distinguish you from other users of our website. This helps us to provide you with a personalised experience when you browse this site. For detailed information on the cookies we use and the purposes for which we use them see our cookie policy (link at the footer of each page).
BEER-N-BBQ by Larry

Roasted Garlic & Rosemary Bread

13 posts in this topic

I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum (http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15812-sourdough-yeast-starter/).

 

Ingredients:
15 oz (wt) Bread Flour
About a cup of Bread Yeast Starter (<--  link to video)
1 bulb Roasted Garlic (wrapped in oil & foil @ 400 deg F for 30 minutes)
2 large fresh Rosemarey Sprigs (minced)
1/2 Tbsp Salt
1 tsp Olive Oil
1 tsp Molasses
About 2-3 oz (wt) Water or more depending on thickness of Starter

 

This is the slideshow version:

 

 

This is the picture by picture version:

 

1) The day before, pull your yeast starter from the fridge, feed it, and let it warm/build up.

DSC_3598.JPG

 

2) The night before, make a sponge starter.  Add 5 oz (wt) Bread Flour, 1 cup yeast starter, and about 2-3 oz water to bowl and mix well.  The sponge should have wet medium consistency. Add water/four as necessary.

DSC_3601.JPG

DSC_3603.JPG

 

3) Next morning, the sponge should be ready.

DSC_3605.JPG

 

4) Roast the garlic, let it cool and squeeze out the soft aromatic cloves into the bowl with the rest of the ingredients.

DSC_3610.JPG

DSC_3611.JPG

 

5) Mix and knead on stand mixer with dough hook for 10 minutes. Add flour or water as necessary to achive a dough ball that doesn't stick to the bowl.

 

6) Form into round ball and place in oiled bowl.  Cover.

DSC_3612.JPG

 

7) Let rise all day.  Punch down a couple times if necessary.

 

8) Form into desired shape (a baguette loaf this time).

DSC_3613.JPG

 

9) Let rise until doublish in size.  In the meantime, fire up the kamado indirectly to about 450 deg F.  Cut diagonal breaks in the top of the loaf and spritz with water spray bottle.

DSC_3614.JPG

 

10) Place loaf on kamado. Cook for 25-30 minutes or until done. Remove and let cool.

DSC_3616.JPG

 

11) Slice it up and serve with sauce of olive oil, parmesan, oregano, and black pepper.

DSC_3618.JPG

DSC_3619.JPG

Remoh, GottaBeKD, ske1eter and 2 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum.

 

http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15226-roasted-garlic-rosemary-bread

 

Larry, I'd like to keep both of these in the recipe section... could you post the ingredients and instruction lists with each?

BEER-N-BBQ by Larry likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum.

 

http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15226-roasted-garlic-rosemary-bread

 

Larry, I'd like to keep both of these in the recipe section... could you post the ingredients and instruction lists with each?

 

Sure, John.  Just did it.

John Setzler likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks terrific. I am trying to figure out how I can make this with the overnight artisan method. I roast garlic all the time and have it in the freezer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So looks like you cook it on paper?

Parchment paper and only long enough for the crust to set then I removed it for the rest of the cook. I do this with pizzas on the grill too.
bondo likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks terrific. I am trying to figure out how I can make this with the overnight artisan method. I roast garlic all the time and have it in the freezer.

What's the artisan method, and how does it differ from my yeast starter to sponge starter to full loaf method?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The artisan method I am talking about is no starter but the 5 minute flour water salt and yeast. Mix all together with water and leave 8 hours to overnight on the counter. I will try your method when I can get my rear in gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just tried this recipe and it had wonderful flavor!! I think I missed a little on the rise though. It was slightly denser than I expected. After pulling from the mixer bowl, I just let it rise all a day ~8 hours. It had doubled already. After forming into a loaf it rose some more. Should I have formed the loaf earlier? Or should I have let rise after forming loaf longer?

 

I am new to bread baking... This recipe is actually one of the inspirations for giving it a shot :-) Thank you for sharing @BEER-N-BBQ by Larry !!

 

Also, I assumed the 5 oz wt of bread flour for the starter was part of the 15 oz total. Was that right? 

 

Thanks again!

IMG_0162.JPG

BEER-N-BBQ by Larry and TKOBBQ like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. Part of the total.
There are many reasons for a poor final rise:
1. Weak yeast
2. The year ran out of food. The initial rise may have went too long. Should be double in size before reforming.
3. Didn't sit long enough to rise.
4. Oven temp is too low. The first ten minutes of baking at least should be at least 450 deg.
5. The skin set before it could rise fully in The oven. Cause:. The oven was too dry. Next time spray some water in the oven initially and at the five minute point to keep steam in the oven long enough to prong the outside firming up.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, BEER-N-BBQ by Larry said:

Yes. Part of the total.
There are many reasons for a poor final rise:
1. Weak yeast
2. The year ran out of food. The initial rise may have went too long. Should be double in size before reforming.
3. Didn't sit long enough to rise.
4. Oven temp is too low. The first ten minutes of baking at least should be at least 450 deg.
5. The skin set before it could rise fully in The oven. Cause:. The oven was too dry. Next time spray some water in the oven initially and at the five minute point to keep steam in the oven long enough to prong the outside firming up.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thanks for the pointers! 

It had been doubled for several hours before I formed the loaf, and probably sat for another 45 min - 1 hr, while the grill came up to temp. It did expand some after forming but I guess it was a mix of 2 and 3 you mentioned. 

 

I'll try again soon and keep an eye on 4 and 5 too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now



  • Similar Content

    • By zero
      Hey guys, I posted this over the recipes forum a day or two ago, because it was the first forum on bread I could find using Tapatalk.  I then realized it was the wrong place for it, so I'm reposting here.
       
      A friend of mine bought Ken Forkish's book "Flour Water Salt Yeast" a little while ago, and after borrowing it for a short span I bought my own copy, and have had a blast baking bread following Ken's instructions.  I've tried a lot his recipes and have started making a few of my own creations using the techniques he teaches.
       
      However, whether I follow a recipe or go freestyle, something as beautiful as the first image always comes out black on the bottom.  I get mixed results in both the KJ and Akorn.  I think the best way I've found for baking in the KJ is with th deflector stones in place directly over the coals.  Only trouble with that is I have a hard time getting to and maintaining 475 degrees, especially with a ginormous Dutch oven in there.  I can get my Akorn to temp REAL fast, and then put the heat difuser in and let things simmer down, but the bottom always comes out scorched.  Again, only time I seem to get burning is when I use the Dutch oven.  Sad. 
       
      My Kamado Joe has been tied up with a pork butt this afternoon, so I fired up my Akorn for the first time in months to have a go. I recall having a little more success with bread on my Akorn (but I haven't done as much bread on my KJ yet - not knocking it), but on both this keeps happening, and I end up cutting off a good portion of the bottom crust.
       
      This particular loaf is about 80% whole wheat, 80% hydration, and is a hybrid levain (i.e. Sourdough), with 100 grams of my own started as well as 1/4 tsp instant yeast (yes, a relatively large amount, but it rises amazingly, which I love).
       
      Baking method: preheat kamado to ~500 with diffuser plate in place and rack above (no water pan), put a pizza steel for extra deflection on the rack, then the Dutch oven on the steel. Let it all warm up 10-20 minutes (maybe not the full amount, but seems to be hot enough), and then drop the loaf in and put the lid back on. Bake for 20 minutes, pull the lid, and then remove after another 5-10 minutes. This yielded the results above.
       
      I thought the lower stone and the steel would keep enough direct heat off the bottom of the bread, but doesn't appear too. The only time I've not burned it is when I've got it directly on a stone on the top rack (no Dutch oven), or in a pie pan on the upper rack of my Akorn (also no Dutch oven). I really want to keep the Dutch oven in place because that's supposedly what makes the bread split open on top. Is an Akorn even moist enough to get away without using it?
       
      Any thoughts and recommendations (and especially experience) is much appreciated. Thanks!


    • By Ronan
      Hi guys,its been a long while since i posted on this website.I have kinda forgot about my vision grill over recent years and have been using my pellet and gas grill more often because of laziness, but this season i have decided to get as much use out of my kamado as possible. I recently went back home to Ireland and was reacquainted with one of my favorite post pub foods...the Chicken shish kebab from a persian place called zaytoon. The chicken shish is chicken marninaded in spices and yogurt and cooked over charcoal,served with salad,garlic sauce,chili sauce on what seems and tastes like a large naan bread.The naans are cooked in a large stone like oven and i thought the kamado would be a perfect substitute if i got the right recipe.Thanks in advance.
      ps here is a video of the recipe for the chicken marinade,this guy has got a lot of great videos for various middle eastern kebab recipes.
       
    • By Smokehowze
      Naan Bread on the Blackstone Oven

      Got the hankering today for some naan bread on the Blackstone.  Used a yogurt based naan recipe off the web and included minced garlic and chopped cilantro as some toppings rolled into the flattened rounds.  Cooked on the Blackstone Patio Oven at between 650 and 700 degrees for about 1 ½  minutes.

      The wood pizza peel worked well to load the naan rounds in sequence with up to three at a time on the rotating stone.   I may have left a few in a bit too long and got them crisper than they should have been learning the cooking times.  But they were still good eats.   Next time out I might raise the temperature to over 800  – we shall see how that works.  Not a bad result at all for first time baking naan on the Blackstone.

      The bread was brushed with salted melted butter after baking.  The bread formed the base for a meal of left over New York strip steak that had been previously grilled on the Kamado as dinner earlier in the week along with sautéed red and green bell pepper, onion and seasonings.

      Enjoy!

      Blackstone Naan



      Naan Dough Proofed and Ready


      Garlic and Cilantro Topping


       

      Portioning


       

      Heating the Blackstone

      Rolling the Rounds - My son took over this part. after he saw my first couple of the rounds... LoL



       

      Let’s Bake


       

      Baking Underway


       

      Hot Off the Stone


       

      A Tray of Naan Bread 


       

      Dinner Is Served - Steak on Naan



    • By John Setzler

      This is probably my first successful attempt at the Josey Baker Bread sourdough recipe and technique.  This loaf will accompany the Thanksgiving meal tomorrow!
    • By John Setzler
       
      Here's a super easy recipe for a delicious cinnamon raisin bread that you can cook on your kamado grill!
      Cinnamon Raisin Bread
      Ingredients for two loaves (cut in half for a single loaf / all else remains the same)
       
      6g (2 tsp) active try yeast 720g lukewarm water (about 3 cups) 210g (about 1 1/2 cups) whole wheat flour 750g (about 5 cups) all purpose flour 24g (about 4 tsp) sea salt 4 tsp (to taste) ground cinnamon 1 cup raisins (soaked in dark rum or warm water for 1 to 2 hours in advance) Combine the yeast and the water and let the yeast dissolve for 10-15 minutes.
      Drain the liquid from the raisins and combine the remaining ingredients in a mixing bowl.  Add the yeast/water to the dry ingredients and mix completely by hand until there are no dry lumps left in the flour.  Let rise for 1 to 2 hours or until doubled in size.  Remove dough to floured surface, spread out, and fold over itself once in each direction.  Repeat that process 3 or 4 times and return to the mixing bowl.  Let rise for another hour or until doubled in size.
      Remove the dough to a floured surface again and divide into two equal parts if making two loaves.  Shape into loaves and place in greased loaf pans.  Cover and let rise again until your grill or oven is ready to go (at least an another 30 minutes).
      Preheat your grill or oven to 425.  Place the loaf pans in the grill or oven and loosely cover with aluminum foil for the first 20 minutes.  Remove the foil and cook for another 20-25 minutes until the bread is done.
      Enjoy!