BEER-N-BBQ by Larry

Roasted Garlic & Rosemary Bread

13 posts in this topic

I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum (http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15812-sourdough-yeast-starter/).

 

Ingredients:
15 oz (wt) Bread Flour
About a cup of Bread Yeast Starter (<--  link to video)
1 bulb Roasted Garlic (wrapped in oil & foil @ 400 deg F for 30 minutes)
2 large fresh Rosemarey Sprigs (minced)
1/2 Tbsp Salt
1 tsp Olive Oil
1 tsp Molasses
About 2-3 oz (wt) Water or more depending on thickness of Starter

 

This is the slideshow version:

 

 

This is the picture by picture version:

 

1) The day before, pull your yeast starter from the fridge, feed it, and let it warm/build up.

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2) The night before, make a sponge starter.  Add 5 oz (wt) Bread Flour, 1 cup yeast starter, and about 2-3 oz water to bowl and mix well.  The sponge should have wet medium consistency. Add water/four as necessary.

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3) Next morning, the sponge should be ready.

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4) Roast the garlic, let it cool and squeeze out the soft aromatic cloves into the bowl with the rest of the ingredients.

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5) Mix and knead on stand mixer with dough hook for 10 minutes. Add flour or water as necessary to achive a dough ball that doesn't stick to the bowl.

 

6) Form into round ball and place in oiled bowl.  Cover.

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7) Let rise all day.  Punch down a couple times if necessary.

 

8) Form into desired shape (a baguette loaf this time).

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9) Let rise until doublish in size.  In the meantime, fire up the kamado indirectly to about 450 deg F.  Cut diagonal breaks in the top of the loaf and spritz with water spray bottle.

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10) Place loaf on kamado. Cook for 25-30 minutes or until done. Remove and let cool.

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11) Slice it up and serve with sauce of olive oil, parmesan, oregano, and black pepper.

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Remoh, GottaBeKD, Freddyj and 2 others like this

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I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum.

 

http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15226-roasted-garlic-rosemary-bread

 

Larry, I'd like to keep both of these in the recipe section... could you post the ingredients and instruction lists with each?

BEER-N-BBQ by Larry likes this

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I'm reposting my October Bread Challenge entry here as an artisan bread recipe. 

 

I also just posted how to make the yeast starter in this same forum.

 

http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/15226-roasted-garlic-rosemary-bread

 

Larry, I'd like to keep both of these in the recipe section... could you post the ingredients and instruction lists with each?

 

Sure, John.  Just did it.

John Setzler likes this

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That looks terrific. I am trying to figure out how I can make this with the overnight artisan method. I roast garlic all the time and have it in the freezer.

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So looks like you cook it on paper?

Parchment paper and only long enough for the crust to set then I removed it for the rest of the cook. I do this with pizzas on the grill too.
bondo likes this

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That looks terrific. I am trying to figure out how I can make this with the overnight artisan method. I roast garlic all the time and have it in the freezer.

What's the artisan method, and how does it differ from my yeast starter to sponge starter to full loaf method?

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The artisan method I am talking about is no starter but the 5 minute flour water salt and yeast. Mix all together with water and leave 8 hours to overnight on the counter. I will try your method when I can get my rear in gear.

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I just tried this recipe and it had wonderful flavor!! I think I missed a little on the rise though. It was slightly denser than I expected. After pulling from the mixer bowl, I just let it rise all a day ~8 hours. It had doubled already. After forming into a loaf it rose some more. Should I have formed the loaf earlier? Or should I have let rise after forming loaf longer?

 

I am new to bread baking... This recipe is actually one of the inspirations for giving it a shot :-) Thank you for sharing @BEER-N-BBQ by Larry !!

 

Also, I assumed the 5 oz wt of bread flour for the starter was part of the 15 oz total. Was that right? 

 

Thanks again!

IMG_0162.JPG

BEER-N-BBQ by Larry and TKOBBQ like this

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Yes. Part of the total.
There are many reasons for a poor final rise:
1. Weak yeast
2. The year ran out of food. The initial rise may have went too long. Should be double in size before reforming.
3. Didn't sit long enough to rise.
4. Oven temp is too low. The first ten minutes of baking at least should be at least 450 deg.
5. The skin set before it could rise fully in The oven. Cause:. The oven was too dry. Next time spray some water in the oven initially and at the five minute point to keep steam in the oven long enough to prong the outside firming up.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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8 minutes ago, BEER-N-BBQ by Larry said:

Yes. Part of the total.
There are many reasons for a poor final rise:
1. Weak yeast
2. The year ran out of food. The initial rise may have went too long. Should be double in size before reforming.
3. Didn't sit long enough to rise.
4. Oven temp is too low. The first ten minutes of baking at least should be at least 450 deg.
5. The skin set before it could rise fully in The oven. Cause:. The oven was too dry. Next time spray some water in the oven initially and at the five minute point to keep steam in the oven long enough to prong the outside firming up.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thanks for the pointers! 

It had been doubled for several hours before I formed the loaf, and probably sat for another 45 min - 1 hr, while the grill came up to temp. It did expand some after forming but I guess it was a mix of 2 and 3 you mentioned. 

 

I'll try again soon and keep an eye on 4 and 5 too.

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