Jump to content

Pulled Pork on the Menu today!


Recommended Posts

Looks and sounds amazing!!  Can I ask a dumb question...?  When you've vacuum packed it up into small portions, what do you do with them?  If any are for the next night, do you  just refrigerate until that meal?  And the remainder I know go in the freezer.  But how do you treat the frozen packs when you pull them out for meals later on?  Thaw slowly in a bath of cold water, or?   And to heat up for the meal - in a pot on the stove, in the dreaded microwave, or?

 

Sorry again, for the dumb-### questions...I just LOVE what I see you doing there, and am starving for tips!

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Canadianeh,

There are no dumb questions.  I normally have one package in the fridge, the rest go into the freezer.  As the one in the fridge is used, one package gets pulled out of the freezer and it is moved to the fridge. 

For re-heat, I put them in a bath of 180 degree water.  At 180 degrees, the seals remain intact.  A really large package might sit in the 180 degree water for up to an hour.  The heated package is kneaded to distribute the juices, and then either served (for pulled pork sandwiches) or incorporated in a dish. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Canadianeh,

There are no dumb questions.  I normally have one package in the fridge, the rest go into the freezer.  As the one in the fridge is used, one package gets pulled out of the freezer and it is moved to the fridge. 

For re-heat, I put them in a bath of 180 degree water.  At 180 degrees, the seals remain intact.  A really large package might sit in the 180 degree water for up to an hour.  The heated package is kneaded to distribute the juices, and then either served (for pulled pork sandwiches) or incorporated in a dish. 

Well thank you!  That certainly is a fantastic and helpful answer...makes a whole world of sense I never would have thought of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Canadianeh,

There are no dumb questions.  I normally have one package in the fridge, the rest go into the freezer.  As the one in the fridge is used, one package gets pulled out of the freezer and it is moved to the fridge. 

For re-heat, I put them in a bath of 180 degree water.  At 180 degrees, the seals remain intact.  A really large package might sit in the 180 degree water for up to an hour.  The heated package is kneaded to distribute the juices, and then either served (for pulled pork sandwiches) or incorporated in a dish. 

Have to re-enter this discussion, this time for SuperBowl planning.  Being the expert in the packaging-then-reheating process, I'm going right to the pro.  I'm doing a 6lb butt for my little SuperBowl party on Sunday.  But I was thinking of doing the cook on Saturday (super-early Sat AM) so it's ready on Saturday night.  Then I thought I'd vacuum seal in packs as you've done here, and reheating during the first half of the game, for serving at halftime.  This, versus putting it on the BBQ at 3-4am Sunday, and hoping it's ready in time, stressing about it, and being dog-tired from being up so early on game day.  Would YOU do it Saturday and reheat as you have above, or would you do it 'fresh' on Sunday morning?   Tips?  Thanks Addertooth!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would do it in advance for sure. You won't taste any difference. And it is far less stressful this way.

Bingo, thanks again man!   Got a lot of feedback on my question I posed in a new thread, that I should vac pack it in whole chunks, and pull it after reheating...seems like a very popular answer.  Have  you done it that way, or just pre-pulled before vac-packing??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I pre-pull before vac-packing.  This way the bag better conforms to the shape of the shredded meat and makes the meat more compact and storable in limited fridge/freezer space.  Hit the Vac-Seal button, and when the juices climb up to where the seal is, hit the seal button to avoid vacuuming out the juices.  I hang the bags off the edge of the counter, so it takes a lot of vacuum to pull the juices a few inches vertically.  By this method, they are simply heated and ready to serve too.  This allows you to do the shredding in advance, when it best fits your schedule, and you have less of a mess (from shredding) at party time.  The more work you do in advance, the more the Host can enjoy any party event he runs.  Make it look easy to your guests, you will come off like a pro. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I pre-pull before vac-packing.  This way the bag better conforms to the shape of the shredded meat and makes the meat more compact and storable in limited fridge/freezer space.  Hit the Vac-Seal button, and when the juices climb up to where the seal is, hit the seal button to avoid vacuuming out the juices.  I hang the bags off the edge of the counter, so it takes a lot of vacuum to pull the juices a few inches vertically.  By this method, they are simply heated and ready to serve too.  This allows you to do the shredding in advance, when it best fits your schedule, and you have less of a mess (from shredding) at party time.  The more work you do in advance, the more the Host can enjoy any party event he runs.  Make it look easy to your guests, you will come off like a pro. 

You really ARE the man!  I like your thinking, all the way around.  Guys on my other thread all seem to point to vac packing full chunks.  One even suggested letting guests pull their own!?  Not liking that idea.  I know if I go to someone's house for dinner, I don't really want to work at it.  I had good great success pulling my last one before I vac packed it, so I don't think I'll mess with success...  Feeling much more confident about the whole process after all the great feedback - specially yours.  Thanks again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The cross-cuts are for:

1. They allow seasonings to make contact with the meat muscle, the fat cap normally blocks transfer of flavor from the spices into the meat. The crevasses are packed with rub prior to smoking.

2. It helps encourage complete rendering of the fat cap, due to greater surface area.

3. It provides channels for the rendered fat to baste into the meat's open grain.

4. It adds a bit of visual appeal to the meat for presentation prior to the pulling. 

5. It breaks the continuous fat cap into smaller pieces, which aids in mixing the bark into the pulled pork.

Followed the guru's advice on our last butt and Addertooths advice was spot on!  Thats how we do butts in our house now :)

post-6823-0-51648700-1422622785_thumb.jp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.  I had good great success pulling my last one before I vac packed it, so I don't think I'll mess with success...  Feeling much more confident about the whole process after all the great feedback - specially yours.  Thanks again.

 

 

Helpful hint.  Shoot a small amount of Apple Juice into the pack before sealing.  When you reheat, the meat will be much more moist and have a little of the flavour added....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share


  • Similar Content

    • By KamadoJim
      Hi,
       
      What are the most popular size of Kamado? Is there any data on whether 18" / 24" / Other are best sellers?
       
      Thanks
    • By pittmab
      1kg back ribs from my local butcher, cooked using a modified 3-2-1 method over charcoal and cherry wood. And finished with a Bulleit bourbon glaze.
       
      Really pleased with how these came out, not fall of the bone but tender and juicy just how I like them!
       
       





    • By COKAMADO
      All,
       
      I am new to the site and messed up the location of my post by initially putting it in the introductions section. Below is the link to that post.
       
      I am looking for ideas on small cracks forming in the firebox of my New Old Kinuura Yaki #5 Kamado.
       
      Photo of kamado for fun
       
       

    • By LJS
      Hello Kamado Peeps,
      I made the best pork belly ever with smoke flavour as well as 100% perfect crackling.
      Take your pork belly and do a lot more scoring on the skin and if you have one of those goodies with lots of spikes then spike the skin. Then ladle boiling water over the skin about 10-15 time to make sure the skin has boiled up a little. Pat dry and then place skin side down on a bed of salt, leave in fridge for 12-24 hours.
      After that just wipe the salt off the skin and add your favorite rub on the meat side.
      Cook indirect heat at 200-220°C until internal Temp is at 75°C perfection.
      Keep smoking 


    • By daninpd
      I was doing some research for this months challenge... okay, okay, I was just watching TV- but it was a cooking show, and the chef on the show was making Pozole Rojo, a red pork stew.  As I watched the show I realized the stew gets a lot of garnishes and condiments, but basically only has 5 ingredients: Pork, Dried Chiles, Hominy, Onion and Garlic.  Talk about a "Well, Duh!" moment.  So I made it.  I used garlic powder from the spice rack to be able to add one garnish  (red cabbage) and let the white onion do double duty, both in the stew and chopped fine for a garnish.  I used a package of pork necks and roasted them at 400 for an hour in the Joe to get a little color, then put them in a Dutch oven with water to cover and let that go overnight at 250 covered in the Joe to make a rich pork stock.  The next day I strained and refrigerated the stock so I could skim off the hardened fat. The rest of the recipe:
      1-1/2 to 2 lbs pork shoulder cut into chunks for stew
      4 oz dried Pasilla Peppers
      1 tsp cumin
      1 tsp garlic powder
      1 tsp Oregano
      1 30 oz can White Hominy drained and rinsed
      1 large white onion diced medium
       
      Destem and deseed the chiles (I included a picture of the seeds from one Pasilla- you don't want the seeds in your sauce) and put them in a bowl and pour in 4 cups of boiling water and let that sit for 30 minutes or so.  Put the chiles and some of the water in a blender and blend, adding water as needed to get a pourable sauce.  Combine all ingredients in the Dutch oven with the defatted pork stock.  Bring to a simmer then cover and cook 4 hours at 250. I left it uncovered a lot of the time to get it to thicken more.  After 4 hours this is a tasty stew.  Typical garnishes are cabbage, avocado, thinly sliced radishes, crema, minced onions, cilantro and fried corn tortillas.






×
×
  • Create New...