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Marty

Chuck Steak in 2 1/2 hours

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I am not sure if this is where to post this. This is on a stove so it technically should not be in the Kamado cooking show case. It seems to fit here. 

 

This cook as shown took 3 1/2 hours from the refrigerator to the table. If I had went straight in to the pan after browning the meat it would have taken 2 1/2 hours and is very feasible for a week night meal. Especially since 1 1/2 hours are in the oven. The chuck steak could be taken to the stall point on the Kamado and the  onions done below. The last stage  could be done at 450 on the Kamado.

 

Chuck steak from Sam's

P1010146.jpg

 

 

Salt and pepper and browned in the tri-ply skillet. This was the first side.

P1010148.jpg

 

 

This was the second side and it was waiting for the onions to get nice and brown. At this point I am 30 minutes in from taking the meat out of the refrigerator.

P1010151.jpg

 

The onions started like this. I like to take them to a dark brown by sticking them to the bottom and de-glazing with a little water. I am not really in a hurry but I do have a timer set for 5 minutes to check and deglaze. I think the kick in flavor is worth it-- but you could just put the meat in and add the wine up the sides at this point.

P1010150.jpg

 

 

This is the onions after an hour and a half.

P1010153.jpg

 

 

Deglaze with a dry red wine. If you use something like a Merlot be sure and really let it boil to cook the fruity taste out.

 

P1010155.jpg

 

 

Add the meat and bring to a good rolling boil.

P1010158.jpg

 

Push foil down almost to touch and put the lid on. This gives the meat a smaller cooking environment and besides sealing the Dutch Oven it is said to slightly pressurize the cooking vessel.

 

This goes into a 450 degree oven for about 1 1/2 hours. When a fork twists easily in the meat it is done. Add water or chicken stock if the liquid gets low.

P1010159.jpg

 

on the stove top brown up some carrots and onions

P1010160.jpg

 

Add chicken stock and cover. Cook until just soft or a little before soft. This is cooking on the stove top as the meat is cooking in the 400 degree oven.

P1010161.jpg

 

When done cut the fat out and cut into bite size chunks.

P1010163.jpg

 

 

Add the carrots and potatoes into the pot with the cut up meat. This is some amazing stew.

 

In looking now I see that I should have tidied up a bit before taking the photo. This was taken in process. The reflection in the back ground was a batch of beans fron scratch.

P1010167.jpg

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You messy cooker, lol. That looks fantastic. I know it shows choice but it looks like prime, super job.

 

 Remo--I end up looking at all of the pieces available at Sam's and that includes both coolers where the Chuck steak is displayed. Some have no marbling and some are mostly fat. i imagine that most of us do the same thing. I was pleased with this one when i found it.

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No worries about messy, that looks yummy.

I am a big mess maker when cooking.

 

CK-I can't help but see that which i did not see when I took the pictures  Yeah sometimes it seems there is a bigger mess than what ended up being made.

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Marty - GREAT cook!  Beautifully done and very beautiful pics.  Messy?  Nah, I don't think so.  Looks like heaven in a pot to me.  

 

Thanks CC. I just cannot express how great this comes out. At some point I will do this bare on the Kamado until it stalls and then put it in the pot and hit 450. I believe it will compress the the time significantly. This does not taste like "fast food".

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No worries about messy, that looks yummy.

I am a big mess maker when cooking.

CK-I can't help but see that which i did not see when I took the pictures Yeah sometimes it seems there is a bigger mess than what ended up being made.
I understand what you mean. I crop out most of my messes before I post the picture.

[emoji2]

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I am not sure if this is where to post this. This is on a stove so it technically should not be in the Kamado cooking show case. It seems to fit here.

This cook as shown took 3 1/2 hours from the refrigerator to the table. If I had went straight in to the pan after browning the meat it would have taken 2 1/2 hours and is very feasible for a week night meal. Especially since 1 1/2 hours are in the oven. The chuck steak could be taken to the stall point on the Kamado and the onions done below. The last stage could be done at 450 on the Kamado.

Chuck steak from Sam's

P1010146.jpg

Salt and pepper and browned in the tri-ply skillet. This was the first side.

P1010148.jpg

This was the second side and it was waiting for the onions to get nice and brown. At this point I am 30 minutes in from taking the meat out of the refrigerator.

P1010151.jpg

The onions started like this. I like to take them to a dark brown by sticking them to the bottom and de-glazing with a little water. I am not really in a hurry but I do have a timer set for 5 minutes to check and deglaze. I think the kick in flavor is worth it-- but you could just put the meat in and add the wine up the sides at this point.

P1010150.jpg

This is the onions after an hour and a half.

P1010153.jpg

Deglaze with a dry red wine. If you use something like a Merlot be sure and really let it boil to cook the fruity taste out.

P1010155.jpg

Add the meat and bring to a good rolling boil.

P1010158.jpg

Push foil down almost to touch and put the lid on. This gives the meat a smaller cooking environment and besides sealing the Dutch Oven it is said to slightly pressurize the cooking vessel.

This goes into a 450 degree oven for about 1 1/2 hours. When a fork twists easily in the meat it is done. Add water or chicken stock if the liquid gets low.

P1010159.jpg

on the stove top brown up some carrots and onions

P1010160.jpg

Add chicken stock and cover. Cook until just soft or a little before soft. This is cooking on the stove top as the meat is cooking in the 400 degree oven.

P1010161.jpg

When done cut the fat out and cut into bite size chunks.

P1010163.jpg

Add the carrots and potatoes into the pot with the cut up meat. This is some amazing stew.

In looking now I see that I should have tidied up a bit before taking the photo. This was taken in process. The reflection in the back ground was a batch of beans fron scratch.

P1010167.jpg

That looks like a happy place [emoji106]

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Is it safe to assume the IT of the meat will be somewhere around 205 - 210?

I have never checked the temp with chuck or brisket except as an idea as to how much longer it will take. My guess is most of the time 205 should do it --but its not ready until it is ready. When you can pull up the foil and stick a fork in all over the roast and it turns easily it is done. Often one side of the roast will be ready and the other can take 10 to 15 minutes longer. When it is easy to twist the fork all over the roast it is ready to cut into bite sized chunks or I guess you could pull it--but we like the chunks

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You messy cooker, lol. That looks fantastic. I know it shows choice but it looks like prime, super job.

 

 Remo--I end up looking at all of the pieces available at Sam's and that includes both coolers where the Chuck steak is displayed. Some have no marbling and some are mostly fat. i imagine that most of us do the same thing. I was pleased with this one when i found it.

I do the same thing Marty. USDA grades to a minimum standard. When I poke and search around in the meat area many times I find steaks that would grade out Prime. For our newbies, External fat is just fat. Internal Muscle fat is the good. Called marbling.

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You messy cooker, lol. That looks fantastic. I know it shows choice but it looks like prime, super job.

 

 Remo--I end up looking at all of the pieces available at Sam's and that includes both coolers where the Chuck steak is displayed. Some have no marbling and some are mostly fat. i imagine that most of us do the same thing. I was pleased with this one when i found it.

 

I do the same thing Marty. USDA grades to a minimum standard. When I poke and search around in the meat area many times I find steaks that would grade out Prime. For our newbies, External fat is just fat. Internal Muscle fat is the good. Called marbling.

 

 

That marbling in the meat is  exactly what i look for like you. But i do not want 40% fat between the meat either and i often do find some like that.

 

My wife thinks that I am crazy going through the entire shelf of bacon or the Chuck Roast. The thing is there is a huge variation across the whole case of meat. She just goes some where else so as not to be seen near that crazy guy.

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You messy cooker, lol. That looks fantastic. I know it shows choice but it looks like prime, super job.

Remo--I end up looking at all of the pieces available at Sam's and that includes both coolers where the Chuck steak is displayed. Some have no marbling and some are mostly fat. i imagine that most of us do the same thing. I was pleased with this one when i found it.

I do the same thing Marty. USDA grades to a minimum standard. When I poke and search around in the meat area many times I find steaks that would grade out Prime. For our newbies, External fat is just fat. Internal Muscle fat is the good. Called marbling.

That marbling in the meat is exactly what i look for like you. But i do not want 40% fat between the meat either and i often do find some like that.

My wife thinks that I am crazy going through the entire shelf of bacon or the Chuck Roast. The thing is there is a huge variation across the whole case of meat. She just goes some where else so as not to be sen near that crazy guy.

Regardless of the type of meat I buy, I always look through the entire lot to find the best piece they have. I just figured everyone (at least all these guru's) did that.

Not crazy making an informed meat purchase. My wife walks away too mainly because she knows I'll be 10 or 20 minutes in the meat department just to get 1 or 2 pieces.

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