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th_4216989e.jpgThe story behind Tri Tip Beef (a.k.a. Triangle Roast): This cut of meat is limited in availability because there is only one per side of beef. Therefore it is typically ground into hamburger or cut into cubes and sold as soup meat. This often over looked piece of meat is not only relatively inexpensive but also very flavorful and has become a favorite amongst the few in the know. The tri-tip roast or steak (also called a triangle roast) is the 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 pounds of meat that sits at the bottom of the sirloin. It has great flavor and tends to be much lower in fat than most cuts of beef i.e., it's a good lean cut of beef.
The thing to remember is that lean also means it will dry out faster so it is recommended that you prepare with a good marinade &/or Rub. Particularly good flavors for tri-tip are Southwestern or Asian. Because tri-tip is lean, be careful not to overcook it, particularly when preparing the full roast. Medium is as far as you should go with this cut. Use a meat thermometer to monitor often during cooking. If you are used to grilling other cuts, this one can throw some grillers off by appearing underdone when it is ready to serve and by the amount it ‘swells’ when cooked.

Santa Maria/Grilled Soy Lime Style – This simple tri tip recipe utilizes a hybrid marinade that is loosely based on a combination of spices picked up from two different recipes.

Ingredients
 2-3 Lb. Tri-tip roast
 Paul Prudhomme’s Magic Seasoning Blends – Meat Magic

Seasoning Marinade:
 2 teaspoons freshly ground 4-color pepper
 1 teaspoon onion powder
 1 Tbls. Garlic powder
 2 Tbls. Sea Salt (fresh ground)
 1 ½ Cups Apple Juice (100% pure juice)
 ¼ Cup Soy Sauce (low sodium)
 2 ½ Tsp. Lime Juice
 1 Tbls. Red Pepper Flakes
 2 Tsp. Worcestershire sauce
 2 Tsp. Cayenne Pepper
 ½ Tsp. Fresh Ground Ginger Root
 Optional: Corn Syrup or Honey (3 Tbls.)

Basting Sauce:
 ½ cup red wine vinegar
 ½ cup vegetable oil (or EVOO) (add garlic powder if you can’t find garlic infused oil) (Continued)

(Continued from Beef Tri-Tip)

Preparation and cooking
1. Mix together all marinade ingredients in a small bowl and pour over the tri tip in a 1 gallon freezer bag. Place in refrigerator for 4-8 hours turning occasionally.
2. Whisk basting sauce ingredients together in a small bowl and set aside for basting.

3. Lightly oil your cooking grid and fire up BGE to T-Rex. Remove from Marinade and pat dry.
4. Rub each side with Paul Prudhomme’s Meat Magic then sear the tri-tip at 600 to 700 degrees for 3-4 minutes per side.

NOTE: This recipe calls for Searing; it is NOT necessary and you can choose to start the cook indirect and get very similar results without searing (cooking time for indirect will increase slightly)

5. Remove seared tri-tip from the BGE, cover it with foil and let it rest while bringing the BGE temperature down to 350 to 400 degrees. Optional: During this cool down period consider adding a few oak chunks to your lump.
6. Now set up BGE for Indirect cooking (plate setter) and return the tri-tip back in the BGE and cook to an internal temperature of 125-130 degrees (approximately 35 minutes) for medium rare, basting with the sauce every 5 to 10 minutes (optional).
7. Return the tri-tip back into the BGE and cook to an internal temperature of 125-130 degrees, basting every 5 to 10 minutes.
8. Remove tri-tip from the BGE, cover it with foil and let it rest 15 minutes; to serve cut into ½” slices against the grain.2

1 Paraphrased from Beef Tri-Tip, One of the best cuts you are probably not buying, By Derrick Riches, About.com Guide 2 this recipe is adapted loosely from Foodnetwork.com’s website; titled “Santa Maria Style BBQ” with lots of input from the gang at EggHeadForum.com

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Greetings and thanks for posting this! That looks like a tasty meal on your table there... I'd LOVE to try cooking a tri-tip but I have been unable to find them anywhere around here (Western NC). I'll snag one the first time I see it though. I'm also going to copy this post to the recipes section....

Thanks!

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I've been making this cut for a while but I keep it really simple - Marinade the steak for about an hour in Port and Brown Sugar, and cook it like a steak with a slightly longer cooking time (I add cherry wood for some added flavor as well). It's usually not that much thicker than a thick steak, I'd say 1.5 / 2 inches thick in most cases.

I haven't tried this on the Kamado yet and I'm honestly a bit nervous about charring the outside too much, but I'm making it tonight and I might try to cook it around 400 and let the temp raise up at the end for a nice char.

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This is my favorite cut by far I've tried it out with just salt and pepper also with uncle Chris rub and also with Angelo' beef rub. Angelo's beef rub is my favorite and the reverse sear method I believe produces a juicier meat. My local Costco's usually has tri tip.

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Worked out great - very delicious and simple - I got a nice marbled piece of steak - this was just under 2lbs

20121205172649.jpg

Didn't take pics but I poured port (a decent but not expensive bottle) over top and added about 1/2 cup of brown sugar to the port and rubbed it all over the top of the steak...

Brought the Kamado up to about 400 degrees (using the internal thermometer, I don't have my maverick yet), threw on a bunch of soaked cherry wood chips, then cooked 4 minutes per side at 400.

Opened both vents fully after that and cooked for about 2 minutes per side until the button therm read rare. Temp went up to 550-600 during this time.

Let it rest for 5-10 minutes - came out very juicy and totally delicious - with a perfect amount of char.

20121205191655.jpg

20121205192127.jpg

20121205192206.jpg

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Tri Tip is one of my favorite cuts of meat and I would love to cook one but the only place I have found them in my area is an exclusive butcher shop at $12 a pound. I refuse to pay that for Tri Tip.

Earl

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If you happen to have a Trader Joe's in your neck of the woods, they sell them. They'll also sell them pre-marinated with the west coast style seasonings. I tried a regular one, and found it pretty good. I've not tried their marinated and seasoned one. I season my own meats, thank you. 

 

If you have a good relationship with your butcher, you can get almost anything within reason.

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th_4216989e.jpgThe story behind Tri Tip Beef (a.k.a. Triangle Roast): This cut of meat is limited in availability because there is only one per side of beef. Therefore it is typically ground into hamburger or cut into cubes and sold as soup meat. This often over looked piece of meat is not only relatively inexpensive but also very flavorful and has become a favorite amongst the few in the know. The tri-tip roast or steak (also called a triangle roast) is the 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 pounds of meat that sits at the bottom of the sirloin. It has great flavor and tends to be much lower in fat than most cuts of beef i.e., it's a good lean cut of beef.

The thing to remember is that lean also means it will dry out faster so it is recommended that you prepare with a good marinade &/or Rub. Particularly good flavors for tri-tip are Southwestern or Asian. Because tri-tip is lean, be careful not to overcook it, particularly when preparing the full roast. Medium is as far as you should go with this cut. Use a meat thermometer to monitor often during cooking. If you are used to grilling other cuts, this one can throw some grillers off by appearing underdone when it is ready to serve and by the amount it ‘swells’ when cooked.

Santa Maria/Grilled Soy Lime Style – This simple tri tip recipe utilizes a hybrid marinade that is loosely based on a combination of spices picked up from two different recipes.

Ingredients

 2-3 Lb. Tri-tip roast

 Paul Prudhomme’s Magic Seasoning Blends – Meat Magic

Seasoning Marinade:

 2 teaspoons freshly ground 4-color pepper

 1 teaspoon onion powder

 1 Tbls. Garlic powder

 2 Tbls. Sea Salt (fresh ground)

 1 ½ Cups Apple Juice (100% pure juice)

 ¼ Cup Soy Sauce (low sodium)

 2 ½ Tsp. Lime Juice

 1 Tbls. Red Pepper Flakes

 2 Tsp. Worcestershire sauce

 2 Tsp. Cayenne Pepper

 ½ Tsp. Fresh Ground Ginger Root

 Optional: Corn Syrup or Honey (3 Tbls.)

Basting Sauce:

 ½ cup red wine vinegar

 ½ cup vegetable oil (or EVOO) (add garlic powder if you can’t find garlic infused oil) (Continued)

(Continued from Beef Tri-Tip)

Preparation and cooking

1. Mix together all marinade ingredients in a small bowl and pour over the tri tip in a 1 gallon freezer bag. Place in refrigerator for 4-8 hours turning occasionally.

2. Whisk basting sauce ingredients together in a small bowl and set aside for basting.

3. Lightly oil your cooking grid and fire up BGE to T-Rex. Remove from Marinade and pat dry.

4. Rub each side with Paul Prudhomme’s Meat Magic then sear the tri-tip at 600 to 700 degrees for 3-4 minutes per side.

NOTE: This recipe calls for Searing; it is NOT necessary and you can choose to start the cook indirect and get very similar results without searing (cooking time for indirect will increase slightly)

5. Remove seared tri-tip from the BGE, cover it with foil and let it rest while bringing the BGE temperature down to 350 to 400 degrees. Optional: During this cool down period consider adding a few oak chunks to your lump.

6. Now set up BGE for Indirect cooking (plate setter) and return the tri-tip back in the BGE and cook to an internal temperature of 125-130 degrees (approximately 35 minutes) for medium rare, basting with the sauce every 5 to 10 minutes (optional).

7. Return the tri-tip back into the BGE and cook to an internal temperature of 125-130 degrees, basting every 5 to 10 minutes.

8. Remove tri-tip from the BGE, cover it with foil and let it rest 15 minutes; to serve cut into ½” slices against the grain.2

1 Paraphrased from Beef Tri-Tip, One of the best cuts you are probably not buying, By Derrick Riches, About.com Guide 2 this recipe is adapted loosely from Foodnetwork.com’s website; titled “Santa Maria Style BBQ” with lots of input from the gang at EggHeadForum.com

I used your recipe last night and I must say this is the best Tri-Tip I have ever had, This recipe is a KEEEEEEEPER for sure. Thanks thebtls

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A sprinkle of kosher salt overnight and a dry rub works very well on this thick cut. I like the big bad beef rub at amazingribs site. I've been grilling these as long as I can remember. I smoke them at 250 with oak to 130, then sear.   This cut is number 185C in the NAMP book, 

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just wanted to say that I used this recipe last night, and got rave reviews from our dinner guests. my wife said it was one of the best steaks she's ever had.

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  • Similar Content

    • By DerHusker
      I’ve cooked a Tri-Tip many times but never posted the recipe. This is the way I do them and they turn out great every time. Here are the ingredients:

      I smear on some Worcestershire sauce, then some fresh ground salt, fresh ground black pepper, some steak seasoning and finally some fresh minced rosemary from my garden.

      Wrap it up for an 8 hour rest in the fridge. Shortly before the 8 hours are up I prep my kamado for 2 zone cooking and lite it up. After taking the Tri-Tip out of the fridge, I put a couple of Pecan chunks on the charcoal and placed the Tri-Tip on the indirect side.

      Here it is after the Maverick says the I.T. is 112 to 113. (No more than 115)

      I take it off and loosely tent it with foil and open up the vents for searing. Once the thermometer reads at least 500 degrees (more like 650 on the grate) I place it on for 3 a sear minute sear.   Here’s a pic without the flash.

      After 3 minutes I flip it and took this pic with the flash.

      Bring it inside and let it rest for 10 minutes.

      I then cut it in half along the seam so I could cut it against the grain. (See the way the grain is running?)

      Sliced

      And that’s Money!

      Thanks for looking.
    • By DerHusker
      This Saturday I turned 60 and we had some friends over for a BBQ / potluck to commiserate errrr I mean celebrate. Friday I pulled 2 Tri-Tips and 3 large steaks out of the freezer to thaw. (1 - 1.75 lb. T-bone, 1 - 2.25 lb. Porterhouse and a monster 2.5 lb.Tt-bone) I seasoned up the Tri-Tips in the my usual way with Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, steak seasoning and some fresh minced Rosemary from the yard.








      For the steaks I just rubbed them down with Worcestershire sauce and then some steak seasoning. This is the Porterhouse.



      Once our guests arrived I didn’t have much time to take pictures so these are all taken with my phone camera and a little hit and miss. I put all the meat on my kamado. It was setup for indirect cooking and was at 300 degrees as we all wanted to eat quickly. (Normally would’ve done them at 250) Once most of them were all at around 115 to 120 IT I took them off and covered with foil. The monster T-bone took a while longer to get up to temp so it was left on the kamado for another 2 to 3 minutes.



      I had set-up my Jumbo Joe in a separate location for searing. Here are the 2 Tri-Tips being seared.



      Here is the Porterhouse and the smaller T-bone waiting to be seared.



      I had set-up a craving station right there on one of the tables so everyone could get some meat as quickly as possible. I sliced up one of the Tri-Tips and then the monster T-bone which had been seared by that time. That meat all went fast so I sliced up the other Tri-Tip which is shown here.




       
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      Everyone had a great time and I’m now officially old.

    • By Bgosnell151
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