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Brisket Help! I'm going to prepare a 9 lbs brisket tomorrow. I've prepared


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smaller briskets on my old electric smoker, but now I'm all freaked out!
 

What do you all recommend?  

 

I'm going to prepare it in a few minutes to sit overnight in the fridge.  I plan to wake up and get the Kamado going tomorrow morning around 8.  The brisket is planned for dinner.

 

What temp do you recommend, foil, no foil, etc.?  Help a newbie out!

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typically 1.5 hours per lb.... @ 225 ....  cook to an internal temp of  190-200.... foil not always needed but it  will help after 160 IT cook after good smoke is applied...  let rest  wrapped after  for at least 1-2  hrs before slicing... this is the Lowslow method ... im sure other will enlighten you to turbo  cooking if needed to speed time!

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My .02 - anywhere from 225 to 275 degrees is fine.  Some even cook a bit hotter than that, just to help power through the stall (and you will experience the stall).  I'm not a fan of foiling because I like a nice, crunchy crust, so I avoid it whenever possible.  Only potential problem I can see is that a 9 lb. brisket is going to be a fairly long smoke, if you're planning on putting it on at 8:30-9:00 am, you're probably going to be looking at a pretty late dinner unless you cook at a higher temp.  If I was smoking at 225-250 and planning on a 6:00 pm dinner, I'd have it on the grill no later than 4:00 am...and even that wouldn't leave as much wiggle room as I'd like!  Better to be done a bit early and rest in it a cambro than to run late and have hungry people waiting.

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I think I'm going to shelf the brisket cook until next weekend. Glad I didn't tear open the package.

The brisket has a sell by date of 2-14, so I think I'll plan for an overnight cook next Friday night. I really wouldn't want to feel rushed.

By the way, do people freeze uncooked brisket? What is the thaw procedure for something like this? I don't think I'll need to freeze.

Thanks again folks!

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Everyone is giving you solid information.  The best info is "start earlier than you think", you can hold the brisket once it's done.  I'm of the 250-275 temp group.  A slightly higher temp will help it plow through the stall.  I take the brisket to 160 degrees then I wrap tightly in foil with some wrapping fluid.  This helps it plow through the stall quicker (about 1.5 hours quicker) and produces au jus.   Once you take the brisket to 198 AND it is probes like butter then get it out of the fire and vent it off to stop  the carry over cooking.  Drain off the au jus and separate our the fat.  Return some of the au jus to the brisket and wrap and hold brisket, after venting of course.  Add the au jus to your favorite sauce and serve.  If you chop the brisket you can mix in the au jus to add more moisture.  If you slice the brisket you can dredge slices through the au jus or pour au jus over the sliced brisket.  Dang tasty.

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I think I'm going to shelf the brisket cook until next weekend. Glad I didn't tear open the package.

The brisket has a sell by date of 2-14, so I think I'll plan for an overnight cook next Friday night. I really wouldn't want to feel rushed.

By the way, do people freeze uncooked brisket? What is the thaw procedure for something like this? I don't think I'll need to freeze.

Thanks again folks!

I think waiting until next week is called "wet aging. "[emoji1]

You'll be fine if it stays in the package until then. Food is almost always edible on the sell-by date. Except, in my house, milk. Always seems to get....funky....on the sell-by date or soon after.

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I prepared the brisket finally - first one on the Big Joe.

I think it turned out great, however I made the decision to foil it right around 162 as the temp sat there for a long time.

I got a little nervous, so I called in for the foil.

Pulled at 201 degrees - wrapped with towel and in the cooler for 1 1/2 hours.

Pretty good - even though a week late.

I used the Kamado Joe Brisket rub, with Apple wood smoke. Nice flavor!

post-7060-14239714527439_thumb.jpgpost-7060-14239714654502_thumb.jpgpost-7060-14239714812771_thumb.jpgpost-7060-14239714912367_thumb.jpg

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275° ish, indirect, I don't foil. If you haven't chosen a rub, I really like 50/50 kosher salt and coarse black pepper. Cook until about 195°, and start probing for tender. When it's like buddah, it's done! Keep it simple!

 

It's hard to beat the simple Texas style for Brisket.  Just using salt and pepper enhances the natural flavor of the beef rather than over-powering it with a bunch of other "flavors" IMO.  Chicken and Pork on the other hand is different.

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Looks darn good to me! 

 

FWIW, lately I have been puttting mine in a half hotel (?) foil pan at ~150 and then covering it with foil - without liquid.  That is somewhere between the no-foil and foil camps.  I think it helps it power through the stall, the bark on top softens, but stays intact, and you get great pan drippings. 

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That's a good lookin' brisket cook right there, great job!  How long did it take to cook?

Thanks, SmokeyMac.  It took a total cook time of 9 1/2 hours.  Around the 7 1/2 hour mark is when I decided to foil.  The temp escalated fairly quickly to the finishing temp.  

 

I'm already looking forward to the next opportunity on smoking a brisket.  I've only smoked very small flats (5 lbs) in my electric smoker (that I'm going to sell now!!!).  This process was quite enjoyable and certainly worth the wait.

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Great cook!! I am waiting until I get my Big Joe set up and familiar with, to do my next brisket. I think I will follow your exact procedure, I usually don't foil but I think I will try it next time. I have also been wanting to try the KJ brisket rub.

Thank you!  You will love the Big Joe.  I really didn't know what I was doing - so I watched several videos, learned from the guru's here and let er rip.

 

The taste and tenderness was wonderful.  

 

I never understood the "probe tenderness" until this cook (stay out of the gutter gurus...even though Valentine's Day just passed).  Like butter.

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Looks darn good to me! 

 

FWIW, lately I have been puttting mine in a half hotel (?) foil pan at ~150 and then covering it with foil - without liquid.  That is somewhere between the no-foil and foil camps.  I think it helps it power through the stall, the bark on top softens, but stays intact, and you get great pan drippings. 

 

I want to give John's Atlanta Brisket a go soon.  If you've not checked that out, check that out!

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