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Valentine's Day B-B-Q Feast


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I made some ribs, coleslaw and potatoes for Valentine's Day and served it with (lots of) margaritas. 

I had run out of lump and I had no choice but to buy a small bag of that Cowboy stuff from Home Depot. I didn't find it to be as terrible as most say, but it was trickier for maintaining temp. I added in a few applewood chips. Ribs were on for 6 hours around 2-225, I spritzed them with Apple juice every hour after the first two. I pulled them off the rack at 5.5 hours and basted. What are your thoughts on using a rib rack anyhow? Is there an advantage or not? 

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