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mogulhuck

Just bought a Classic Joe!

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After cooking with my Akorn for about a year (which I'm definately keeping) I bought a Joe today and I'm wicked excited to fire it up....It was a floor model at a store thats had it about a year so its the older style and didn't come with a heat deflector.  I'm not sure where to buy one....maybe I need to buy the new divide and conquer set up?  Any advice would be appreciated!

 

Mogulhuck

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I haven't heard  anything but praise for the D&C rack system. (although, there have been some complaints about finding one and troubles with availability).  It looks like it provides a wide variety of set up options which will really help you get the max cooking potential out of your new Classic. By the way, congratulations on your purchase. 

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What Bosco said, and 1. Welcome to the Forum, and 2. I got my Joe with a classic heat deflector, then bought the Divide and Conquer. I use both, honestly. 

 

For long smoking sessions, like ribs, shoulders, and briskets, it's the classic heat deflector all the way. 

 

For more involved cooks, where the lid gets opened more often, I use the Divide and Conquer setup. 

 

I did a Tri-Tip (particular cut of beef) roast for the holidays a few months back. For this cook I put a half moon heat deflector on the low end of one side of the D&C setup, grill grate on the upper rack, then next to the deflector, again, on the lower rack, another grill grate. 

 

So I had a deflector below and a rack both next to it and above it. I slow smoked the roast above the deflector on the rack until it was about "blue" rare (meaning really, really, rare). Once it hit that temp, I moved it over to the lower rack, next to the deflector and right above the coals so that I could do what we call a "reverse sear." 

 

A reverse sear is when you cook it to just below the temp that you want to eat it (for most, it's medium rare), and then char the outside for a nice crust right before serving. 

 

Well, it turned out killer. Like anything on my Kamado Joe. So long as you don't burn it, it's going to be great. 

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Mogulhuck - Welcome aboard Kamado Guru and welcome to The Addiction!  That new KJ is a very nice cooker ... you'll love the food you cook on it!  Very nice score.  There is a ton of information here about the KJ and there are a TON of KJ users here.  Take a look at the KJ thread for some really good info.   :welcome:

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What Bosco said, and 1. Welcome to the Forum, and 2. I got my Joe with a classic heat deflector, then bought the Divide and Conquer. I use both, honestly. 

 

For long smoking sessions, like ribs, shoulders, and briskets, it's the classic heat deflector all the way. 

 

For more involved cooks, where the lid gets opened more often, I use the Divide and Conquer setup. 

 

I did a Tri-Tip (particular cut of beef) roast for the holidays a few months back. For this cook I put a half moon heat deflector on the low end of one side of the D&C setup, grill grate on the upper rack, then next to the deflector, again, on the lower rack, another grill grate. 

 

So I had a deflector below and a rack both next to it and above it. I slow smoked the roast above the deflector on the rack until it was about "blue" rare (meaning really, really, rare). Once it hit that temp, I moved it over to the lower rack, next to the deflector and right above the coals so that I could do what we call a "reverse sear." 

 

A reverse sear is when you cook it to just below the temp that you want to eat it (for most, it's medium rare), and then char the outside for a nice crust right before serving. 

 

Well, it turned out killer. Like anything on my Kamado Joe. So long as you don't burn it, it's going to be great. 

 

thanks for the support :-D

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