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brian - don't mind you asking one it.  All soaking does is wet the outside of the wood.  Wood simply does not absorb water; if it did, wooden ships would never have been able to sail any distance at all.  Water produces nothing but steam.  You don't want steam, you want smoke, right?!  I just don't see that soaking does any good whatsoever.  Just my opinion and you know what opinions are worth!  Especially mine!

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Well I'll take any advice you give me. I'm here to get opinions and try to improve my cooks! Just like what you just told me. It seems very logical. My food hasn't really been bad but hey it can always be better.

Brian - we're all here to learn and help! I look forward to your posts, especially the posts with pics of your cook!

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I'm also a big fan of chunks. Plus, if I want to, I can bust them down to size if need be. If I know it's going to be a quick cook, the wood goes closer to where I start the coals. If It's a long cook, I stage them a bit from the start, but remember, meat only takes on smoke flavor for only so long. I think I recently read up to 140 degrees or so. You never want to over smoke your food. 

 

Hope this helps. Enjoy your cook!

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Wood Chips, well if you accidentally buy any plants love them so they'll never go waste. Show your outdoor fern some love and save all the wood chips for him.

When using wood chunks, youe goal is to obtain that beautiful thin blue smoke that will create that smell and taste we're all after when smoking. Unlike an offset this can be a challenge on a Kamado. In an offset. The fire is burning in a seperate chamber rather right below so blue smoke is easier to create once you get the hang of loading the right amount of charcoal and smoking wood.

In Kamado you create a similar effect by using the lump to create a chamber. Your smoking wood should be burried underneath the 2 layers of lump charcoal. This creates a chamber effect around the smoking wood slowing down the burn rate creating thin blue smoke.

If you toss the smoking wood on top of the lump you'll get thicker white smoke and over smoked bland creosote coated eats.

- Step One: Lay down a layer of large lump pieces at the bottom above the grate.

- Step Two: Use some medium pieces to level out the bottom layer

- Step Three: Place your wood chucks in a circle around the center in a 7 diameter circle. Place a layer of large peices of lump over the wood chucks. Leave a 3-4 area in the dead center open for lighting.

- Step four: Add a layer of medium lump pieces over the layer of large pieces you placed over the wood chucks. Make sure you cannot see any exposed wood chucks. If there's still room, pile more medium or small lump pieces unitl your lump is slightly higher than the holes in the firebox.

- Light the 3-4 gap you left in the center. If you're using a Looftlighter, Joe Blow or Map torch, blast the center with heat until a flame shots up and 6-7 lump pieces are well lit and glowing. If you're using fire starters then you need to wait a few minutes for a fire to start glowing in the center. Fill in the gap with some lump. Put in the deflectors and close down the vents leaving the top and bottom vents only open a inch.

- Take your time bringing the Kamado up to temp . It should take 35 - 50 minutes to reach 225F. When the Kamado hit 200, close down vents to 1/4 inch - 1/8 inch. The needle should settle on 225F.

You can get your Kamado up to 225F in 15 minutes but your temps will be unstable and you'll have a hard time getting the thin blue smoke. This has nothing to do with the performance of your Kamado. The temp inside is a factor of how much lump is lit in your Kamado. Lightng too much lump will make it harder to lock in 225F. Slowly and gradually lighting the lump will allow you to hit 225F on the nose and stay there for the entire cook.

Slow and easy wins the race when you're smoking.

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Wood Chips, well if you accidentally buy any plants love them so they'll never go waste. Show your outdoor fern some love and save all the wood chips for him.

When using wood chunks, youe goal is to obtain that beautiful thin blue smoke that will create that smell and taste we're all after when smoking. Unlike an offset this can be a challenge on a Kamado. In an offset. The fire is burning in a seperate chamber rather right below so blue smoke is easier to create once you get the hang of loading the right amount of charcoal and smoking wood.

In Kamado you create a similar effect by using the lump to create a chamber. Your smoking wood should be burried underneath the 2 layers of lump charcoal. This creates a chamber effect around the smoking wood slowing down the burn rate creating thin blue smoke.

If you toss the smoking wood on top of the lump you'll get thicker white smoke and over smoked bland creosote coated eats.

- Step One: Lay down a layer of large lump pieces at the bottom above the grate.

- Step Two: Use some medium pieces to level out the bottom layer

- Step Three: Place your wood chucks in a circle around the center in a 7 diameter circle. Place a layer of large peices of lump over the wood chucks. Leave a 3-4 area in the dead center open for lighting.

- Step four: Add a layer of medium lump pieces over the layer of large pieces you placed over the wood chucks. Make sure you cannot see any exposed wood chucks. If there's still room, pile more medium or small lump pieces unitl your lump is slightly higher than the holes in the firebox.

- Light the 3-4 gap you left in the center. If you're using a Looftlighter, Joe Blow or Map torch, blast the center with heat until a flame shots up and 6-7 lump pieces are well lit and glowing. If you're using fire starters then you need to wait a few minutes for a fire to start glowing in the center. Fill in the gap with some lump. Put in the deflectors and close down the vents leaving the top and bottom vents only open a inch.

- Take your time bringing the Kamado up to temp . It should take 35 - 50 minutes to reach 225F. When the Kamado hit 200, close down vents to 1/4 inch - 1/8 inch. The needle should settle on 225F.

You can get your Kamado up to 225F in 15 minutes but your temps will be unstable and you'll have a hard time getting the thin blue smoke. This has nothing to do with the performance of your Kamado. The temp inside is a factor of how much lump is lit in your Kamado. Lightng too much lump will make it harder to lock in 225F. Slowly and gradually lighting the lump will allow you to hit 225F on the nose and stay there for the entire cook.

Slow and easy wins the race when you're smoking.

 

You're getting to scientific again.   :rofl:

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Wood Chips, well if you accidentally buy any plants love them so they'll never go waste. Show your outdoor fern some love and save all the wood chips for him.

When using wood chunks, youe goal is to obtain that beautiful thin blue smoke that will create that smell and taste we're all after when smoking. Unlike an offset this can be a challenge on a Kamado. In an offset. The fire is burning in a seperate chamber rather right below so blue smoke is easier to create once you get the hang of loading the right amount of charcoal and smoking wood.

In Kamado you create a similar effect by using the lump to create a chamber. Your smoking wood should be burried underneath the 2 layers of lump charcoal. This creates a chamber effect around the smoking wood slowing down the burn rate creating thin blue smoke.

If you toss the smoking wood on top of the lump you'll get thicker white smoke and over smoked bland creosote coated eats.

- Step One: Lay down a layer of large lump pieces at the bottom above the grate.

- Step Two: Use some medium pieces to level out the bottom layer

- Step Three: Place your wood chucks in a circle around the center in a 7 diameter circle. Place a layer of large peices of lump over the wood chucks. Leave a 3-4 area in the dead center open for lighting.

- Step four: Add a layer of medium lump pieces over the layer of large pieces you placed over the wood chucks. Make sure you cannot see any exposed wood chucks. If there's still room, pile more medium or small lump pieces unitl your lump is slightly higher than the holes in the firebox.

- Light the 3-4 gap you left in the center. If you're using a Looftlighter, Joe Blow or Map torch, blast the center with heat until a flame shots up and 6-7 lump pieces are well lit and glowing. If you're using fire starters then you need to wait a few minutes for a fire to start glowing in the center. Fill in the gap with some lump. Put in the deflectors and close down the vents leaving the top and bottom vents only open a inch.

- Take your time bringing the Kamado up to temp . It should take 35 - 50 minutes to reach 225F. When the Kamado hit 200, close down vents to 1/4 inch - 1/8 inch. The needle should settle on 225F.

You can get your Kamado up to 225F in 15 minutes but your temps will be unstable and you'll have a hard time getting the thin blue smoke. This has nothing to do with the performance of your Kamado. The temp inside is a factor of how much lump is lit in your Kamado. Lightng too much lump will make it harder to lock in 225F. Slowly and gradually lighting the lump will allow you to hit 225F on the nose and stay there for the entire cook.

Slow and easy wins the race when you're smoking.

You're getting to scientific again. :rofl:

Not really. I've been watching one too many BBQ with Franklin videos and have surcumed to blue smoke perfection obession. If the smoke ain't blue you ain't using my Q.

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I use chunks and don't soak them.  If you use chips, you'll have to open your kamado several times during the first couple hours to keep adding wood chips, which messes with your temperature stability.  Soaking wood does no good other than creating steam instead of smoke until the wood dries out - and it also doesn't make sense to be putting water on top of your burning charcoal.  It's kinda like stepping on the brake pedal while you're pushing on the gas pedal. :)

 

 

I use chucks for the most part.  I have used chips for quick cooks like burgers occasionally. If you want to read more on soaking VS not soaking, http://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/18079-to-soak-or-not-to-soak-that-is-the-question/?hl=%2Bsoak+%2Bnot+%2Bsoak

 

Another read on soaking vs. not soaking:  http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/mythbusting_soaking_wood.html

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