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Nunyabiz

Pizza, dough, and cooking method

45 posts in this topic

We’re grilling thin crust pizza tonight on our Primo XL, our second time (1st time was good but crust was still a little chewy), so I came here looking for some pointers to improve.    

 

What an excellent write up!  Thanks for sharing and the details re thin crust.

 

I’m going to use the deflectors and place the stone close to the top of the dome and see how that works.  I’m also going to use the flour you suggested, and this time drop the oil.  I’ll write again on how it turns out and what i learn.   

 

Thanks again.  

 

You're welcome.

Please do post results, pizza can be tricky to get dialed in just right, whenever you change something it can affect something else like dominoes.

 

Another thing you can try that I bet you will like is when you make dough for the regular type crust that has the oil and the sugar/honey in it is to make about an extra 400 gr or 14-16oz extra and use that the next day for making Garlic Knots to have with Pasta.

Just roll it out about 1/4" thick and then slice into strips about an inch wide and then tie into a knot, make up some Garlic Butter I use the best butter I can find, chop up several cloves of Garlic, and usually about a tablespoon of Basil Pesto though Sun Dried Tomato Pesto I am sure would also be good. Mix that all up well and coat the knots completely. Sprinkle a bit of fresh Parmesan on top.

Let them rise about an hour then bake in oven until golden brown.

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Made the pizza last night following your cooking instructions to a tee and...very sound method!  Pizza crust and toppings were done to perfection.  

 

Here’s a photo of my grill set up

 

post-10044-0-46013900-1446921039_thumb.j

 

 

And here’s what they looked like

 

post-10044-0-40203400-1446921119_thumb.j

 

It took about 45 minutes to get the grill steady between 470 and 500 but that was the perfect temp - the crust had no burn on the bottom and the toppings were fully cooked.  Cooking close to the dome definitely helped.  

 

I couldn’t find Antico Molino Caputo 00 flour anywhere in town so I used un-bleached all-purpose flour. The crust was good but not perfect (to me the perfect thin crust is similar to a Quesadilla crust - crispy yet light) so next time I’m in Toronto I’ll stop in to a couple specialty stores I trust will carry Antico.

 

Will stick with this method.  

 

 

dwilkie likes this

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Made the pizza last night following your cooking instructions to a tee and...very sound method!  Pizza crust and toppings were done to perfection.  

 

Here’s a photo of my grill set up

 

attachicon.gifIMG_3262.JPG

 

 

And here’s what they looked like

 

attachicon.gifIMG_3270.JPG

 

It took about 45 minutes to get the grill steady between 470 and 500 but that was the perfect temp - the crust had no burn on the bottom and the toppings were fully cooked.  Cooking close to the dome definitely helped.  

 

I couldn’t find Antico Molino Caputo 00 flour anywhere in town so I used un-bleached all-purpose flour. The crust was good but not perfect (to me the perfect thin crust is similar to a Quesadilla crust - crispy yet light) so next time I’m in Toronto I’ll stop in to a couple specialty stores I trust will carry Antico.

 

Will stick with this method.  

 

Outstanding!

Looks really good.

 

You can also get that flour on Amazon.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Antimo-Caputo-Pizzeria-Flour-Repack/dp/B0067DAXRY

 

Now a "thin crust" especially with this type of flour and without Oil/Sugar etc can handle hotter temps without burning , so if you did say 480 and it was good, with the Antimo flour maybe try 510 to 530.

That may get you that lighter crispier crust.

 

I know on mine when I do the regular crust with the oil and the honey and tons of toppings that about 480 is perfect, nice very crisp bottom, slightly chewy soft inside and perfectly done toppings using the King Arthur Bread Flour. 

May have to play with it just a bit to get the exact crust you seek, but once you do you can repeat it easily over and over.

Tosh likes this

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Thanks for the tips - when I get a chance to make with Antimo flour I’ll definitely raise the temp. and report back !  

Nunyabiz likes this

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Hi, does anyone know if you can use this method, but not use the platesetter?

 

Thanks!

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Hi, does anyone know if you can use this method, but not use the platesetter?

Thanks!

You can try it, but maybe put the stone in later instead of 45 minutes.

Maybe put the stone in 10 minutes before the pizza.

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I tried this without the platesetter and it worked great...wish I had some pics, but I put the pizza stone in about 10-15 minutes before cooking, and then cooked the pizza for 15-20 minutes out roughly 450 F. 

SmokeOrFire likes this

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I also dont use the plate setter any more for pizza.  I used a "large woo" to elevate the pizza stone just above the felt for easy peel use.  I start the BGE with the stone in place to avoid thermal shock.  I use a thin crust based on the recipe that comes with Cuisinart food processor (usually use 2/3 white unbleached flower, and 1/3 wheat) and light toppings.  Preheat the grill until the stone is 450-500 (using infrared thermo through the top vent), don't care about air temp (since it can be quickly adjusted with vent, unlike stone) but its usually between 500 and 600.  As soon as the stone is >450 ready to start cooking, about 15-20 minutes after lighting (with hi-que grate or KAB, probably need another 5-10 minutes with stock drain cover).  Once pizza is on the stone I keep the dome between 550 and 600 (usually wide open vent).  Once its done (10-15 minutes, look at it dont time it), all but shut bottom vent.  When ready for next pizza, open it wide, stone will still be around 500, and air will be around 400.   I would NOT do this without the infrared as the stone would quickly get too hot to cook the crust without burning.  Assuming you have infrared, this halves preheat time.

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Yep, there are numerous ways to get roughly the same results.

Pizza is sort of a juggling act.

My method is what I finally settled on after carbonizing a few crust my juggling lead me to use a bottom stone close to coals, the pizza stone just as high as I can get it, one time I noticed my temp dropping fast and I was like WTH and I looked through the top vent and the temp probe was in the pizza dough.

Now it's about 1/4" away so it's as high as it will go.

I found in this position I can heat soak the stone at 480 degrees for 45 minutes and it's the perfect upper and lower heat distribution to cook the bottom of the crust and the toppings at exactly the same time.

For my personal juggling act that is what works for me.

All my pizzas now are cookie cutter, all perfect and exactly the same.

Once you get your method that works for you stick with it and you are good to go.

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1 hour ago, Kev said:

Dough was great! Best pizza I've had!  1487698024471.jpg

Welcome, please stop by and introduce yourself. 

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On 2/21/2017 at 0:29 PM, Kev said:

Dough was great! Best pizza I've had!  1487698024471.jpg

 

Cool, glad it worked for you

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I came back to browse this thread because...Drum roll....I finally got my hands on some double zero flour !!  It’s not the Antimo brand but rather Molino Grassi TIPO 00.  

 

Cooking up some pies tonight and I feel like a kid on Christmas Eve...I can’t wait!  

 

Will take pics and report back on method and results.

 

I like food... ;) 

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