Jump to content

First long cook


Recommended Posts

hello, first I want to say thank you for the advice last night on starting and trying to keep temp in my range. I posted on the vision section I had issues with temps getting up to 291. I eventually got them down to 262 for a couple hours and went to bed. I had the alarm set for 320. After about 6 hours of smoking, it had risen to the 320. It eventually went as high as 329. I was able to get it back down to 300 and went to bed. It hit internal temp an hour later.

One thing I noticed was it seemed to be a bad smoke/bitter smoke while cooking. I believe I had some issues with smoldering, creating an unclean cook. When I took the two Boston butts off, the bottom was pretty chared. I wrapped these in aluminum and just finished pulling apart. The outside was not edible, too much of a burnt taste for me. The inside is delicious and has a nice smoke ring.

I normally use water pans in my other cookers, with this set up, I had a lava stone as a heat deflector and no room for drip pan. I'm thinking part of the issue was grease running down sides of lava stone and flare ups? one of the BB's was more chared than the other.

I knew this was going to be a learning experience......it is......but I still love it :-)

I have a question, do most of you use a wood mixed with lump? That may be my issue with the smoldering and bitter smoke.....aka....unclean? I had sprinkled hickory chips over top of the lump?

Thank you for advice!post-9480-0-32591800-1436628353_thumb.jppost-9480-0-39521900-1436628302_thumb.jppost-9480-0-25453300-1436628372_thumb.jppost-9480-0-31871200-1436628391_thumb.jppost-9480-0-75493300-1436628410_thumb.jp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

luvysbbq - first off, that looks like a very nice first cook! Congrats and kudos!

You don't need a water pan when you cook in a kamado. Water pans are primarily used by cooks who employ kettles, stick burners, gassers, etc. because those cookers move so much air through the cooking chamber that the cook dries out. This is decidedly not the case with ceramic kamados like your Vision!

I also always use a drip pan under every cook to keep my kamado clean. A clean kamado is a safe kamado. A grease filled kamado is the primary cause of flashbacks, a dangerous situation that develops in a greasy kamado. That's why it is recommended that you always crack your kamado's lid open about an inch, count to 5, and then open the lid fully. Better safe than sorry!

When I'm not using my smoke pot to generate smoke, I will put smoke wood directly on the fire and then I'll place it in concentric circles around the fire. I always use chunks, never chips. Chips are useless in my opinion. And forget about soaking anything in water. That doesn't help the smoking process one little bit. All you do is generate steam, not smoke!

All in all, I'd say this was a successful first cook! Every cook will get better, what's that old joke about how do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice, practice! The very same can be said about kamado cooking .... cook, cook, cook! Enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am glad you were able to salvage some of it,what you were able to save looks great.  Since  we both have the classic ,this is how I set mine up. I don't have a lava stone , and really have no plan on getting one. I simply set a pizza stone on the lower grate ,then on top of that I place a water pan, why use water? you have to think about this as being an oven ,if you set that pork butt on your center shelf in your oven and placed a pan under it to catch the drippings eventually it will fill your house up with stinky smoke, the same thing will happen outside ,but will go unnoticed ,so for this reason I use the water pan. I use the upper rack to cook on ,same as in your house cooking in the center of the oven. Here is what I do that is different , after half way threw the cook ,I bring it in the house ,then put spray butter on it then very light coating of brown sugar then transfer to a pan with a lid, with a small amount of apple juice (2 table spoons) in the bottom ,then turn it up to 300 to finish off the cook, This idea speeds it up a lot ,and you don't have a stall spot ,also the bone pulls away just like it does with the ribs. I will post a picture of mine when finished .       

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did your rub have sugar in it? Sugar burns at about 300°, so if your temp went up that high, it's probably likely that the burning was from burned sugar as opposed to flares. My low and slows are usually in the 250°F range, I don't use a drip pan, and have not had the problems you described in your post.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok I have a few pictures here, I set my grill up as follows ,I filled the fire box up to about 2 inches above the air holes, then lit with my electric igniter for about 8 min ,then pulled it out and stirred it slightly ,then added my wood chunks ,then my pizza stone ,then water pan, then set the meat open on the top shelf. closed the lid and set like landscapers right away ,and let it gradually come up, With the screen mine ends up at around 225- 240 , so then I leave it there for half of the cook, 3-4 hours ,then I transfer to the wok ,I used to use a pan with foil ,but this works great.  Before I put it in the pan I spray it with butter then a very light coat of brown sugar and a very small amount of apple juice in the bottom of the pan (2 Tables spoons) Then I return to the grill at 300 for the rest of the cook. This was a little over 8lb  which was an 8 hour cook . Using  this method I ended up with a lot of juice and the fat started falling off which was a nice time saver. The juice tasted unbelievable, I can't wait to see what my guest think of that. Now here is a good opportunity to do something fun, The smoke wood has long been burned out ,and you have also burned out any grease from past cooks , so good time for a cake. In the last picture from all the cooking is what was left of un-burned charcoal . The one picture is a cereal bowl full of juice. It started raining on me so plastic bag on handle and tuna can on thermometer .    

post-2008-0-84870400-1436652765_thumb.jp

post-2008-0-15253500-1436652793_thumb.jp

post-2008-0-99842600-1436652817_thumb.jp

post-2008-0-79611000-1436652832_thumb.jp

post-2008-0-51964400-1436652845_thumb.jp

post-2008-0-78551700-1436652865_thumb.jp

post-2008-0-82005700-1436652882_thumb.jp

post-2008-0-10882600-1436652901_thumb.jp

post-2008-0-70280600-1436653067_thumb.jp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a lava stone as a heat deflector and no room for drip pan. I'm thinking part of the issue was grease running down sides of lava stone and flare ups? one of the BB's was more chared than the other.

 

 

When cooking on a Vision there's not a lot of room between the heat deflector and the bottom rack. One way around this is to use scissors to trim down the sides of a foil pan, that's what i do with mine. I also suggest wrapping the deflector in aluminum foil. Try using 2-3 wood junks instead of chips, and target 250 cooking temp. Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a lava stone as a heat deflector and no room for drip pan. I'm thinking part of the issue was grease running down sides of lava stone and flare ups? one of the BB's was more chared than the other.

 

When cooking on a Vision there's not a lot of room between the heat deflector and the bottom rack. One way around this is to use scissors to trim down the sides of a foil pan, that's what i do with mine. I also suggest wrapping the deflector in aluminum foil. Try using 2-3 wood junks instead of chips, and target 250 cooking temp. Good luck!

Are you trimming a full or half steam pan? Also, are you putting it on the bottom grate?

The accessory kit came with a bracket to hold the stones, but will not hold full pan, may hold half pan? That would still allow a lot of grease to drip down. In my UDS, I'm able to fit a full size steam pan above the coals, this allows me to add beer, water, and apple juice. It eventually catches all the drippings as well.

I need to figure out a way to incorporate a drip pan?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...