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The gasser would be my primary use, but I will use my Kamado for some high temperature grilling on occasion. My thought was to get it sized and trimmed for the Kamado, but have it live in the gasser.

 

How is the clean-up? Do you wash it or burn it off?

Edited by BBQ Boy
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Thanks for the timely feedback! I just ordered a three piece (shaped) set that will work on my Weber gas grill and my Akorn kamado. Looking forward to a test firing.

I would appreciate a pic of the GGs on your Akorn

 

thanks

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Will do. I will probably be about a week.

 

 

Thanks for the timely feedback! I just ordered a three piece (shaped) set that will work on my Weber gas grill and my Akorn kamado. Looking forward to a test firing.

I would appreciate a pic of the GGs on your Akorn

 

thanks

 

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This is an opinion I found on another forum:

 

"i'm really not a fan of grillgrates

they're really only good for getting crisp clean marks
but even then, they mark too dark. the maillard reaction is where the marks come from. Sugars in food essentially caramelize into that nice golden brown mahogany.
With grill grates, this happens very fast because all of the heat is conducted directly to the surface of the grates. 
Everything marked with grill grates will get a dark black mark, which is actually TOO dark. It's just like making caramel. You want your marks to be a rich brown/mahogany color. Black marks are burnt and bitter.

Plus they prevent fats and juices from dripping into the coals - which is where some of the best flavors come from!"

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This is an opinion I found on another forum:

 

"i'm really not a fan of grillgrates

they're really only good for getting crisp clean marks

but even then, they mark too dark. the maillard reaction is where the marks come from. Sugars in food essentially caramelize into that nice golden brown mahogany.

With grill grates, this happens very fast because all of the heat is conducted directly to the surface of the grates. 

Everything marked with grill grates will get a dark black mark, which is actually TOO dark. It's just like making caramel. You want your marks to be a rich brown/mahogany color. Black marks are burnt and bitter.

Plus they prevent fats and juices from dripping into the coals - which is where some of the best flavors come from!"

 

I understand where this guy is coming from... While I like the GrillGrates, I have had some mixed experiences when trying to sear with them.

 

GrillGrates work REALLY well for grills that don't get excessively hot. They focus that heat and transmit it well to the surface of the meat, so grills which have trouble searing normally will really benefit from GrillGrates.

 

That said, if you can get your grill up to 600+ dome temp--and have a cooking rack in a low position for searing, where the grate temp is probably 800+--GrillGrates will over-sear your food. 

 

I've burnt the crap out of the crust on a steak trying to blacken it with the GrillGrates upside down, and I've had grill marks come in almost too dark as the quoted text above when using them facing up. Both times it's been from running the grill at nuclear temps and then still using the GrillGrates for searing.

 

That said, I can see two major uses where they'll make sense:

 

  1. When you're doing multiple things on your grill. Let's say you're cooking up vegetables at the same time you want to sear your steak. You don't want the grill at 600 degrees for the veggies, but if you don't ramp up the temp, you won't get a good sear. GrillGrates is a great compromise here, because you can sear very well without nuclear temps.
  2. When you're doing something that just needs a pure sear. I.e. if you want to do sous vide or reverse sear a steak, instead of pulling the steak off at an IT of 115 and then expecting to carry it the rest of the way on the grates, pull it at 130, go nuclear, and then sear it for a VERY short time on the GrillGrates, i.e. <= 15-30 seconds a side. Don't give it enough time to severely burn the surface, and don't expect the IT to raise at all from this process.

But in general, nuclear+GrillGrates = burnt to a crisp.

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This is an opinion I found on another forum:

 

"i'm really not a fan of grillgrates

they're really only good for getting crisp clean marks

but even then, they mark too dark. the maillard reaction is where the marks come from. Sugars in food essentially caramelize into that nice golden brown mahogany.

With grill grates, this happens very fast because all of the heat is conducted directly to the surface of the grates. 

Everything marked with grill grates will get a dark black mark, which is actually TOO dark. It's just like making caramel. You want your marks to be a rich brown/mahogany color. Black marks are burnt and bitter.

Plus they prevent fats and juices from dripping into the coals - which is where some of the best flavors come from!"

 

I understand where this guy is coming from... While I like the GrillGrates, I have had some mixed experiences when trying to sear with them.

 

GrillGrates work REALLY well for grills that don't get excessively hot. They focus that heat and transmit it well to the surface of the meat, so grills which have trouble searing normally will really benefit from GrillGrates.

 

That said, if you can get your grill up to 600+ dome temp--and have a cooking rack in a low position for searing, where the grate temp is probably 800+--GrillGrates will over-sear your food. 

 

I've burnt the crap out of the crust on a steak trying to blacken it with the GrillGrates upside down, and I've had grill marks come in almost too dark as the quoted text above when using them facing up. Both times it's been from running the grill at nuclear temps and then still using the GrillGrates for searing.

 

That said, I can see two major uses where they'll make sense:

 

  1. When you're doing multiple things on your grill. Let's say you're cooking up vegetables at the same time you want to sear your steak. You don't want the grill at 600 degrees for the veggies, but if you don't ramp up the temp, you won't get a good sear. GrillGrates is a great compromise here, because you can sear very well without nuclear temps.
  2. When you're doing something that just needs a pure sear. I.e. if you want to do sous vide or reverse sear a steak, instead of pulling the steak off at an IT of 115 and then expecting to carry it the rest of the way on the grates, pull it at 130, go nuclear, and then sear it for a VERY short time on the GrillGrates, i.e. <= 15-30 seconds a side. Don't give it enough time to severely burn the surface, and don't expect the IT to raise at all from this process.

But in general, nuclear+GrillGrates = burnt to a crisp.

 

Perfectly said

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I haven't used them, but I seared a steak on my Akorn last weekend and had a ton of flare ups that I think blackened the outside a bit too much.  I've been considering getting some GrillGrates to see if that solves the problem.

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I love mine. Absolute best thing for a gasser, bar-none. I ordered set to cover the whole surface of my four-burner Beefeater gas grill. Really can't stand yo use propane any more, but the GG's make it a heckuvalot better. Beyond that, I think I have three or "round" sets for Webers, Vision Classic, Akorn, etc... Haven't played around with the Big Joe much yet, but I'll prolly get at least a half-circle set for Big Joe. Probably have > $500 invested in the GG market, but have no regrets at all. Use them for any burgers, chops, steaks, chicken, sausage, or basically anything I "grill". Don't use them when smoking, but don't see why you couldn't. Cleanup is a breeze. All of my friends and family that I've suggested them to love them as well. I spose Theyre not for everybody, and some people don't see the need or appeal, but I love mine.

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