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funkahdafi

Getting to the good smoke

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Hi guys,

 

I am still new to smoking. I am trying to get to the thin blue smoke but it always takes me forever. I have a lot of thick white smoke all the time. Any hints on how to get there faster?

 

I am using wood chunks btw, not chips. And I don't soak them in water.

 

However, my chunks are rather large. Could that be the reason (taking them forever to glow through)?

 

Thanks

 

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Are there other ways too? I am not sure I am ready to "waste" a dutch oven for this. I don't mind having a little bit of white smoke in the beginning, if there is a method to turn it into thin blue smoke very quickly. 

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I have the same issue. The way I figure is I try to limit the amount of wood which is in the fire while bringing up to temp. If. You are still raining the temps, you are feeding more air and the wood will burn dirtier, when you are at temp then the wood smoulders more with the good smoke. So I try to put the wood a bit further away from where I light it so that it starts smouldering a bit later. This is what I'm trying to do, but I can't say I've been completely successful yet. :)

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IMO, "thin blue smoke" is an over rated concept. Get your pit to your target temp, and as long as a a lot grey or white smoke isn't blowing out of your top vent, toss in the food. I've done thousands of kamado cooks and can honestly say I have never looked for, or waited for, thin blue smoke. 

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The other technique would be to lay a one layer of large lump at the bottom. Place your wood chunks is a circle around toward the center of fire box. Add two or more layers of lump. Leave a couple of pieces out of the center of create a ditch for lighting. Blast the center of your lump with a Mapp torch or Looftlighter.

Burying the wood chucks under the lump will create a cleaner burning smoke. Sometimes the magic smoke burns clear. Don't let the blue smoke thing fool you. Some denser smoking woods and fruit woods burn clear rather than blue. Blue smoke is usually On my oak, pecan, hickory burn with blue smoke.

I find to harder to get the Fruitwoods to burn with blue smoke. I find Fruitwoods will burn clear thin light white smoke vs blue.

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IMO, "thin blue smoke" is an over rated concept. Get your pit to your target temp, and as long as a a lot grey or white smoke isn't blowing out of your top vent, toss in the food. I've done thousands of kamado cooks and can honestly say I have never looked for, or waited for, thin blue smoke.

Same here, yesterday's ribs went on while the smoke was gray and peeps devoured them at the cookout. Smoke did turn this and blue after an hour or so.

post-2109-0-12031400-1440349072.jpg

post-2109-0-46617400-1440349098.jpg

That is a couple chunks of peach and a whole bag of cherry chips that someone gave me. I soaked the cherry chips overnight (no real reason other than I saw someone do it on the internet once).

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IMO, "thin blue smoke" is an over rated concept. Get your pit to your target temp, and as long as a a lot grey or white smoke isn't blowing out of your top vent, toss in the food. I've done thousands of kamado cooks and can honestly say I have never looked for, or waited for, thin blue smoke. 

 

I am not actually aiming for having the smoke thin and blue, I just used that term for lack of a better word. What I am actually looking for is less smoke. I posted a thread about having trouble with my neighborst a few days ago and it's the thick white smoke that's bothering them. After a while it disappears and instead I have almost invisible smoke (not sure if it's blue, I wouldn't say so). That's what I want and I am wondering how to get there quicker.

 

My point is how do I prevent heavy smolder thick smoke.

 

Is it possible it is related to the size of the chunks? I read somewhere on Facebook that the larger the chunks, the more time it takes for them to get to a state where they smolder less.

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I aim for the thin blue smoke. Maybe it's personal vanity, maybe it's the sweet smell of blue smoke coming from your chimney, maybe it's the flavor profile, or maybe, just maybe it's all about the that perfect brisket with a perfect crust.

Some may call the pursuit of blue smoke folly and an obsession, I call it the never ending mission to obtain perfection we all strive for.

I aim for the thin blue smoke. Maybe it's personal vanity, maybe it's the sweet smell of blue smoke coming from your chimney, maybe it's the flavor profile, or maybe, just maybe it's all about the that perfect brisket with a perfect crust.

Some may call the pursuit of blue smoke folly and an obsession, I call it the never ending mission to obtain the perfection we all strive for.

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Ok, whether it's blue or not, any hints on how I get there quickly?

Sorry funk, I misunderstood your original question.

When I don't have any smoking wood in there, the smoke seems to thin out quicker for me when adding oxygen. I typically cook with the bottom vent wide open at all times and adjust temps with daisy wheel. Don't know if this helps, give it a shot. You're really in a tough spot with the neighbors complaining, I feel for you on this one.

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Sorry, language barrier (I am not a native speaker). I actually want to add wood, but then want to get to a state where it thins out as quickly as possible. It usually takes me forever to get there. Hope this makes sense.

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My understanding (and I could very well be wrong) is that the white smoke is water and other volatiles burning off.

 

I have read numerous times of people with stick burners laying wood on top of the firebox to "preheat" it. It probably drives some of the moisture and other chemicals out, reducing the plume of white smoke when adding wood to their fire.

 

You could try something similar by warming the wood chunks on a cooking grate before adding it to the fire below. It means a lot of messing around to finish getting deflectors in place since you need to leave a path to the fire...

 

I've never tried it, so don't know if it will make any difference, but it might be worth a shot.

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