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John Setzler

Sous Vide / Reverse Sear Ribeye

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As always, excellent video, John.  Very informative and professional. One more for the library of great cooks.

I've been experimenting with sous vide for the past few years, principally with thick steaks, and agree with you that it has certain advantages and certain disadvantages.

Lately, I've been experimenting with using a stovetop smoker (outdoors) with some cherry wood chips, before sealing the steak in the vacuum bag.  I'll post results soon.

One thing I really like about this method is the freedom the cook gains in terms of timing of the final sear.  Recently, I held a 2" ribeye @ 130* about 8 hours until I got home from work and had time to hard sear. It was one of the best steaks I've eaten.

Congratulations on one more excellent project and another excellent video.

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That looks beautiful is there much of a taste difference compared to just bringing it up to temp on the joe

 

There is a bit of a taste difference.  You don't get as much of the charcoal / wood fire cook flavor as you normally would since the meat is not exposed to the fire nearly as long.  As jack mentioned in the previous post, you could do some slow smoking of the meat before you put it in the sous vide bath.  I intend to experiment with this when cooler weather arrives.  I'd like to cold smoke a steak for an hour or two and then season it and put it in the sous vide bath.

 

One other way to help that situation would be to use a couple drops of liquid smoke in the vacuum seal bag prior to the sous vide bath.

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Looking forward to seeing you cook that brisket. How large a cut are you planning? Or rather, how large a bath can the NOMIKU manage?

 

I dunno yet.. i'd like to do a 7-8 pound flat if I can find a suitable one.  I'd do a full packer if I could find one in that size range also.  The Nomiku can handle 5 gallons of water at least... maybe a little more in the right conditions...

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John - I have found that I do indeed like more of a seared flavor than just that which Sous Vide alone can provide. To solve that "problem" I sear my steaks before the sous vide immersion. That allows the seared flavors to permeate the steaks. When I have finished with the sous vide portion, I rest the steaks, and then I take them back out to my kamado and sear the steaks again. This method of sear-sous vide-sear really yields, at least to me, a better taste than sous vide alone.

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John - I have found that I do indeed like more of a seared flavor than just that which Sous Vide alone can provide. To solve that "problem" I sear my steaks before the sous vide immersion. That allows the seared flavors to permeate the steaks. When I have finished with the sous vide portion, I rest the steaks, and then I take them back out to my kamado and sear the steaks again. This method of sear-sous vide-sear really yields, at least to me, a better taste than sous vide alone.

 

I can't imagine even trying it without a sear.  

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Nice cook John

I've just done some chicken legs, wings and thighs in the SousVide Supreme and it worked wonderfully

Many try to argue for and against sous vide about it tasting better. For me, that's not the point least for meat anyway. It's about easing the timings and making less stressful. This is particularly good for big cooks.

I like the idea of a quick sear, sous vide and sear again. But laborious but I can see how it can work. You only need small amounts of flavour to make a big taste

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Very interesting and another well done video. I have been looking at getting into Sous VIde but I just don't want to give up grilling, I enjoy the whole grilling process and being retired, time is not a factor for me. I don't think the SV would beat a good reverse sear and I just don't think I would enjoy the SV enough to justify the cost. 

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Very interesting and another well done video. I have been looking at getting into Sous VIde but I just don't want to give up grilling, I enjoy the whole grilling process and being retired, time is not a factor for me. I don't think the SV would beat a good reverse sear and I just don't think I would enjoy the SV enough to justify the cost. 

 

As with anything, your mileage may vary with any technique.

 

The one thing I mention when I hear that, though, is that SV doesn't need to replace grilling. It's a technique. That technique can be applied to any number of different foods, depending what you want to accomplish. And the technique can accomplish certain textures and cooking results that are nearly impossible to replicate any other way.

 

If you take a look here, you'll see that sous vide goes WAY beyond just cooking steaks... http://recipes.anovaculinary.com/

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Very interesting and another well done video. I have been looking at getting into Sous VIde but I just don't want to give up grilling, I enjoy the whole grilling process and being retired, time is not a factor for me. I don't think the SV would beat a good reverse sear and I just don't think I would enjoy the SV enough to justify the cost.

As with anything, your mileage may vary with any technique.

The one thing I mention when I hear that, though, is that SV doesn't need to replace grilling. It's a technique. That technique can be applied to any number of different foods, depending what you want to accomplish. And the technique can accomplish certain textures and cooking results that are nearly impossible to replicate any other way.

If you take a look here, you'll see that sous vide goes WAY beyond just cooking steaks... http://recipes.anovaculinary.com/

+1

Sous is not replacing anything. Well maybe a pot of hot water.

As you say it's so much more than just getting tender steak. You can do quite complex stuff or basic vegetables which are amazing

Like I said earlier I love it because you get 100% consistency (which is why the restaurant trade love them) and the fact you have a ceiling time of hours before the food is ruined.

Like doing a big family meal. I normally do the veg in it cos I'm not having to watch the pots all the time and can get the most perfect veg without any stress or skill even. Hell you can cook it all beforehand stick the bags in iced water and you can reheat later in the sous vide when you need them in a much reduced cook time.

I love mine to bits and can only see it complementing BBQ'ing and even then only in certain but very useful situations

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