Jump to content

Pork Butt: Boneless vs. Bone-in


UTVol
 Share

Recommended Posts

Wanted to get some thoughts on bone in vs. boneless for a pork butt.  In NC I picked up my meat from Costco and the butts were all boneless which was fine, I didn't think anything of it.  I went to a local meat market and found a great deal on a pork shoulder and then when it was time to rub realized it was bone- in which threw me off.

 

Fast forward: I'm now in Texas and there are some price differences (large ones) with great selection for bone in vs. boneless.  Wanted to get some thoughts on bang for buck and a qualitative difference between the two.  Obviously, you're paying for the bone and that's dead weight but the price per pound is cheaper.  I didn't notice a big difference on finished product taste between the two but wanted some input from you guys and gals.

 

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They isn't any difference in the meat so its all about preference.  I personally like the bone in as they are a little cheaper and you don't have to tie the shoulder together so it cooks evenly.  The Costco here has both bone in and boneless so I get to make my choice.  Its also nice to see that bone come out with little effort after that long cook.  Just makes you smile knowing that the shoulder is cooked perfectly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found that when injecting,

if boneless when you inject the sauce shoots right out where the bone used to be and makes a big mess of the kitchen

With the bone in, that is not a problem and the sauce stays where it is supposed to be

So knowing ahead of time whether your going to inject or not would be only thing that would make a difference to me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Wardy
      So started my first overnight cook (two 5 1/2 pound pork shoulders) on my Weber summit kamado very early this morning. Planned for 10-12 hours at 225-250 so it could get rested and pulled for an early dinner at 4pm. We're hosting a baby shower for my sister in law so want plenty of food without me standing over the BBQ too much whilst people are here. I've been finding sourcing large pork cuts tricky here in the UK but spotted 2.5 kg pork shoulders in costco so picked a couple up.
       
      Did a basic rub of salt, sugar, paprika, garlic powder, chilli and sage. Left the cuts to sweat for a couple of hours and got the grill set up. 
       
      I had some problems getting the temperature stable in the first place, I was aiming to start the grill about 11 and get the meat on for midnight. I overshot the temp, I think because I added too much lit coal, so spent untill 1am getting the temp back down and stable. I put the meat on at about 12.30am. Not planning to look at the grill again until the morning.
       
      Got woken up by the kids so checked the temperatures at about 3 am and all was good. This morning I woke up at 8 to find the fire had gone out. Looks like either the ash from my briquettes had blocked the lower air intake or I'd set the vents too low in the first place. Think I'll try lumpwood next time and see if that's better.
       
      I've got the grill back up to temperature now (about 9.30am) and fingers crossed 4/5 more hours will do it. Internal temp has just hit 152 so I'm pretty sure it should still be fine. The dome is currently at 260 which is slightly higher than I want but probably not a bad thing all things considered.
       
      I wasn't planning to wrap the meat when it hit the stall but now am thinking it might be a good idea. I think I'll see where it's at at 11am. 
       
      Atmospheric picture of the grill being lit and the pork shoulders going on from last night:


       
      Will update with how they turn out later 
    • By pittmab
      1kg back ribs from my local butcher, cooked using a modified 3-2-1 method over charcoal and cherry wood. And finished with a Bulleit bourbon glaze.
       
      Really pleased with how these came out, not fall of the bone but tender and juicy just how I like them!
       
       





    • By daninpd
      I was doing some research for this months challenge... okay, okay, I was just watching TV- but it was a cooking show, and the chef on the show was making Pozole Rojo, a red pork stew.  As I watched the show I realized the stew gets a lot of garnishes and condiments, but basically only has 5 ingredients: Pork, Dried Chiles, Hominy, Onion and Garlic.  Talk about a "Well, Duh!" moment.  So I made it.  I used garlic powder from the spice rack to be able to add one garnish  (red cabbage) and let the white onion do double duty, both in the stew and chopped fine for a garnish.  I used a package of pork necks and roasted them at 400 for an hour in the Joe to get a little color, then put them in a Dutch oven with water to cover and let that go overnight at 250 covered in the Joe to make a rich pork stock.  The next day I strained and refrigerated the stock so I could skim off the hardened fat. The rest of the recipe:
      1-1/2 to 2 lbs pork shoulder cut into chunks for stew
      4 oz dried Pasilla Peppers
      1 tsp cumin
      1 tsp garlic powder
      1 tsp Oregano
      1 30 oz can White Hominy drained and rinsed
      1 large white onion diced medium
       
      Destem and deseed the chiles (I included a picture of the seeds from one Pasilla- you don't want the seeds in your sauce) and put them in a bowl and pour in 4 cups of boiling water and let that sit for 30 minutes or so.  Put the chiles and some of the water in a blender and blend, adding water as needed to get a pourable sauce.  Combine all ingredients in the Dutch oven with the defatted pork stock.  Bring to a simmer then cover and cook 4 hours at 250. I left it uncovered a lot of the time to get it to thicken more.  After 4 hours this is a tasty stew.  Typical garnishes are cabbage, avocado, thinly sliced radishes, crema, minced onions, cilantro and fried corn tortillas.






    • By LJS
      Hi Kamado People,
      I have been smoking for about 2 years now and I have never tried a pork roast style cook and beside whenever I have done pork roasts I have not got the crackling right and this is critical.
      So I decided to research a little and found heaps of methods out there, anyway I was stuck on three types 1. Continuous apply of vinegar, 2. Apply lots of salt to fat/skin, boiling water. All of these have the requirement of putting the pork into the kamado at a very hot temperature for around 30-40 mintues before dropping temperature to normal roasting temp of around 180/200°C.
      All of the above are required to have a dry roast, not fresh out of the plastic pack , best left overnight. At the last minute I decided to go with boiling water pouring over the fat and then right away into the hot kamado mine was at about 250/270°C range with one chunk of cheery, had no apple in the shed.
      Any how after 30min I closed the vents and the temp started to drop. Once at 180°C I left her there until internal reached 75°C and wow wow what a beauty. Moist and perfect crackling. Salt was needed to be added though.  


    • By philpom
      they've been on for a bit, cruising at 215°f.  Going to finish each one differently but still debating the details.
       

       
       
×
×
  • Create New...