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Anybody smoked a steak?


Dubliner
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There a restaraunt here in Austin that serves smoked sirloin, it's more like a cross between brisket and a very tender steak as you can have it rare. It's really good. I've got some nice thick sirloins I thought I might try but I'm wondering how I might do it, smoke for an hour and then sear it later? Tia Dubliner.

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Reverse sear. 225 deg slow smoke until steaks hit 110 then remove from grill and raise the temp 600. A quick toss back on the grill to finish it off to your desired temp and its the best steak out there. I got a couple nice strip thick strip loins ready for tonight. Mesquite in the one and only for me when it comes to beef.

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Yes, I have done it.  The steaks usually turn out RED.  You can cook them to well-done and they retain more juice and tend to be more tender.  The downside is they take longer to cook this way. 

This picture is of Chuck steaks which were cooked low and slow.

 

post-6716-0-66824200-1449936401_thumb.jp

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I think if you cook it like a tri-tip (which it basically is) you can achieve a good result. 275*-300* with favorite smoking wood,wait for thin blue smoke before you put meat on. Cook to a IT of 115*,pull and rest. Fire up grill to 500* ++. Sear quickly and enjoy!

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Yes, I have done it.  The steaks usually turn out RED.  You can cook them to well-done and they retain more juice and tend to be more tender.  The downside is they take longer to cook this way. 

This picture is of Chuck steaks which were cooked low and slow.

 

Addertooth, whats the best way to do this?

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Do it all the time.

Cold Smoke for 2-3 hrs. then cook like you normally would.

Better yet, put back in refer for day or two before cooking -- let's the smoke penetrate the steak even

more. We love cold-smoked steak. Works on hamburger too, but usually too much trouble for something

you douse with condiments.

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Yes, I have done it.  The steaks usually turn out RED.  You can cook them to well-done and they retain more juice and tend to be more tender.  The downside is they take longer to cook this way. 

This picture is of Chuck steaks which were cooked low and slow.

 

Addertooth, whats the best way to do this?

 

I won't make the claim of the "best way", but rather, how the steaks pictured were done. 

225 degrees, indirect heat, cherry and Jack Daniels oak barrel staves used as the smoking wood. 

It produced a nice smoke ring on the steaks, with nice smoky notes balancing out the beefiness of the chuck steaks.

Normally I won't cook a chuck steak hot and fast, I prefer to cook it in a way which produces a more tender result.

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  • 5 years later...

250F heat deflectors on, chunk mesquite, why not finish temp at 250?  Besides losing Malliard reaction or crust?

 

Smoked to 115F mesquite, at 600F searing time 1min per side, or more or less time?

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I have tried it a couple times, but it is not our preference - reason being is we just prefer our steak to taste like...well...steak.  I find adding the smoke just tends to be a bit overpowering for the cut.  For the price of beef now...I don't want it to taste like $1 worth of charcoal.

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