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Jack.

USDA Prime NY Strip @ 1100*

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Steak looks terrific! I have been interested in the air cooker for fries. What are your opinions? Are the fries better than baking in the oven? I really do like to deep fry them and we only have them once in a blue moon because of that.

Thanks again, Betty.  In answer to your question regarding the air fryer, I like it very much, and much prefer French fries on the air fryer to those from the oven.  Being careful not to overload the basket and spraying with a light coat of oil produces a pretty good fry.  Not the same as deep fried, of course, but pretty good nonetheless.

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That looks amazing--- another awesome cook. So which way do you prefer?  Sous Vide and The Cook Air or directly to the Cook Air.

 

Because of you I bought one for Christmas and have not tried it yet.

Thank you, Marty.  For cuts more than 2" I like to sous vide and then hard sear.  I've learned since my earlier post that seasoning the meat before it goes in the vacuum bag helps a lot to add flavor during the water bath.

For cuts under 2" I like the super hot Cook Air flip/flip, then, at the very end turn the fan to #1, put on the lid and add just a bit of smoke from the cooking wood.

Go ahead and break yours out of the box.  I'd love to see your results.

 

 

Jack sorry no pictures. I did 5 steaks yesterday.  Salt, pepper, burger seasoning, garlic powder and let sit in the refrigerator for most of the day

 

All I can say is WOW. I got such an even nice brown by flipping at the one minute mark and finishing at 200 in the BJ. No black spots and almost perfectly even dark brown --just like your steaks.

 

My wife said you kids have to be sure and learn how your dad does it.

 

My only complaint is that I had to fill it three times and because I let it go too far on the first batch---relight a second time.

 

The only other thing that works the well for me  is a screaming hot CI skillet or a grate directly on the hot coals. With the grate on the coals you are reaching down into a blast furnace  with a Kamado and it can go from needing a bit more and being almost burned in 10 to 20 seconds.

 

I LOVE this and hope it holds up.

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The Cook Air grill loaded to capacity with cherry wood lumps and brought to a screaming 1100* with the fan on high for the entire cook.

 

Nice sear job jj. Hot & Fast is how I like my steaks. The Cook Air doesn't appear to have a dome thermometer which is kind of a shame. They are a lot more easy to transport than a small ceramic. I have a covered back porch just off my kitchen. I wouldn't ever consider using any kind of a ceramic kamado back there due to the fact that it is attached to my house. I have strong feelings about charcoal cooking on decks that are attached to homes. It just isn't smart, however I would probably feel OK about using one of those back there, as the base stays cool, and they appear to cool down quickly. It would beat runnng out to my pitt in real cold or inclement weather. 

Two questions: (1) Can you burn lump charcoal in the Cook Air? 

                         (2) Am I correct there is no dome thermometer, and if not, do you feel that is an issue?

Thanks in advaance jj!!!

 

 

Andy

 

This is recommended primarily for cooking with the dome off.

 

They do not recommend any thing above the first fan setting with the lid on. Even when you go to the number 1 fan setting they recommend keeping the lid tipped open. Which at 1 you do get a lot of smoke to finish a steak.

 

. What they are afraid of is the heat getting down into the fan and destroying it.

 

Also you do not get a very long  cooking time. You are putting the wood in a fist sized chamber and hitting  with fan fed air.

 

For five steaks --I had to fill it three times. They do not recommend more that two pieces of 2 inch by 2 inch chunks at a time--- so you do not get  long to cook,  Reloading is easy though as long as you still have coals. After filling it three times---- all that was left on the bottom was a thin layer of ash. You really get it all out of the wood load.

 

BUT WOW you do get a fierce and even sear on a steak on the high setting. After the first use I am in love.

 

You get a very hot and even searing heat from the same wood chunks that you throw in the Kamado but it is ---IMO from the first cook---- meant for a fast sear and not a real cook.

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The Cook Air grill loaded to capacity with cherry wood lumps and brought to a screaming 1100* with the fan on high for the entire cook.

 

Nice sear job jj. Hot & Fast is how I like my steaks. The Cook Air doesn't appear to have a dome thermometer which is kind of a shame. They are a lot more easy to transport than a small ceramic. I have a covered back porch just off my kitchen. I wouldn't ever consider using any kind of a ceramic kamado back there due to the fact that it is attached to my house. I have strong feelings about charcoal cooking on decks that are attached to homes. It just isn't smart, however I would probably feel OK about using one of those back there, as the base stays cool, and they appear to cool down quickly. It would beat runnng out to my pitt in real cold or inclement weather. 

Two questions: (1) Can you burn lump charcoal in the Cook Air? 

                         (2) Am I correct there is no dome thermometer, and if not, do you feel that is an issue?

Thanks in advaance jj!!!

 

 

Andy

 

This is recommended primarily for cooking with the dome off.

 

They do not recommend any thing above the first fan setting with the lid on. Even when you go to the number 1 fan setting they recommend keeping the lid tipped open. Which at 1 you do get a lot of smoke to finish a steak.

 

. What they are afraid of is the heat getting down into the fan and destroying it.

 

Also you do not get a very long  cooking time. You are putting the wood in a fist sizes chamber and hitting  with fan fed air.

 

For five steaks --I had to fill it three times. They do not recommend more that two pieces of 2 inch by 2 inch chunks at a time--- so you do not get  long to cook,  Reloading is easy though as long as you still have coals. After filling it three times---- all that was left on the bottom was a thin layer of ash. You really get it all out of the wood load.

 

BUT WOW you do get a fierce and even sear on a steak on the high setting. After the first use I am in love.

 

You get a very hot and even searing heat from the same wood chunks that you throw in the Kamado but it is ---IMO from the first cook---- meant for a fast sear and not a real cook.

 

 

Mine arrives Monday Marty. I am only going to use it for quick sears on Steaks, and for Brats, Chops, Salmon fillets and Chicken Breasts when I am short on time. I just ordered a new catamaran, so we will probably bring the Cook Air along when sailing other lakes.  The 12v DC adapter will come in handy. 

 

.....I will be searing a lot of Steaks with chunks of Bourbon Barrels. I foresee burning s lot of Peach, Pecan and Alderwood also.

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The Cook Air grill loaded to capacity with cherry wood lumps and brought to a screaming 1100* with the fan on high for the entire cook.

 

Nice sear job jj. Hot & Fast is how I like my steaks. The Cook Air doesn't appear to have a dome thermometer which is kind of a shame. They are a lot more easy to transport than a small ceramic. I have a covered back porch just off my kitchen. I wouldn't ever consider using any kind of a ceramic kamado back there due to the fact that it is attached to my house. I have strong feelings about charcoal cooking on decks that are attached to homes. It just isn't smart, however I would probably feel OK about using one of those back there, as the base stays cool, and they appear to cool down quickly. It would beat runnng out to my pitt in real cold or inclement weather. 

Two questions: (1) Can you burn lump charcoal in the Cook Air? 

                         (2) Am I correct there is no dome thermometer, and if not, do you feel that is an issue?

Thanks in advaance jj!!!

 

 

Andy

 

This is recommended primarily for cooking with the dome off.

 

They do not recommend any thing above the first fan setting with the lid on. Even when you go to the number 1 fan setting they recommend keeping the lid tipped open. Which at 1 you do get a lot of smoke to finish a steak.

 

. What they are afraid of is the heat getting down into the fan and destroying it.

 

Also you do not get a very long  cooking time. You are putting the wood in a fist sizes chamber and hitting  with fan fed air.

 

For five steaks --I had to fill it three times. They do not recommend more that two pieces of 2 inch by 2 inch chunks at a time--- so you do not get  long to cook,  Reloading is easy though as long as you still have coals. After filling it three times---- all that was left on the bottom was a thin layer of ash. You really get it all out of the wood load.

 

BUT WOW you do get a fierce and even sear on a steak on the high setting. After the first use I am in love.

 

You get a very hot and even searing heat from the same wood chunks that you throw in the Kamado but it is ---IMO from the first cook---- meant for a fast sear and not a real cook.

 

 

Mine arrives Monday Marty. I am only going to use it for quick sears on Steaks, and for Brats, Chops, Salmon fillets and Chicken Breasts when I am short on time. I just ordered a new catamaran, so we will probably bring the Cook Air along when sailing other lakes.  The 12v DC adapter will come in handy. 

 

.....I will be searing a lot of Steaks with chunks of Bourbon Barrels. I foresee burning s lot of Peach, Pecan and Alderwood also.

 

 

Andy for that it should be awesome.

 

I saw something similar sold on Real Goods years ago and really wanted it but they wanted a lot more for it and as far as I know is now out of business,

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Thank you, Chuok0531.  As reported earlier, I'm having a ball with this little grill.  Once I got to learn it a little bit, it has become my go to for hot and fast steaks, chicken, pork chops, fish and for the final sear after a sous vide prep.  $150 well spent, IMO.

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