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I have had my Akorn for almost a year and absolutely love it.I have talked with several that owns Komado Joes and BGE and they tell me that the Akorns in their opinions are cheap made and will only last 3-5 years before I have to replace it ? I am curious if anyone has had their for very long and any problems if any you may have encountered.

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I have owned an Akorn.  Key elements to expanding the useful lifespan are:

 

1. Remove ashes after every use, ashes become caustic from atmospheric moisture and corrode the lower fire-grate and frame.

2. Keep moisture out of the inside of the Akorn, even though the metal is coated it can rust from the inside out.

3. Keep some kind of food oil on the cast iron food grate, otherwise it will rust.

4. Sometimes it will split along a folded metal seam, little the end user can do to prevent this, it is more of a production issue.

 

Key advantages on the Akorn:

1. Included 2 level cooking system.

2. Lighter weight for transportation.

3. Very high insulating factor, less charcoal used.

4. Very easy to lift lid.

 

In the final analysis, how long does the seller warranty the product.  If the manufacturer cannot offer a lifetime warranty, they probably have their reasons (and they designed it).

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I keep my Akron on my porch with the Akron cover (which is extremely high quality I might add) and I leave the bottom vent slightly cracked during storage. I empty the ash pan every 3rd cook and use a drip pan for long slow and lows like briskest, butts, ribs.

Like most users I was worried about rust and wanted to go to extremes to protect it and make it last. As the last two years have gone by its very easy to see that the threat of it rusting out was highly over exaggerated.

If you generally take care of your stuff and can store it out of the elements you won't have any issues.

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I've owned my Akorn for 3 full years now and it's holding up very very well. I'm used it hundreds of times and it hasnt failed me yet. I never did any mods to it and it still holds temps well and no rust. Ive never covered it but it lives permanently at the edge of a patio cover.The warming rack got stuck and I wrecked it by forcing it out. I only empty the ashes every 5-6 cooks. I burn mostly Trader Joes natural briqs plus sometimes lump. Ill bet it will last me another 3 years  and I'll probly buy another. It's that good. :!:

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I just decided to replace my Akorn after about 3 years. I used it a lot, 4 times a week usually. I had already replaced the lower ash pan piece and warming rack, but now rust was developing around the base lip of the top dome and I could see the inner metal liner was going to come apart from the dome.  I decided to get a new one now when I saw a good deal, and keep the old one as a back up.  I always kept it covered (at least after it had cooled down), but I live in a very humid environment where things rust easily.  I will try the suggestions of cracking the vent and emptying out the ash pan more often.

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Amazing how the KJ and BGE owners seem to think they know how long an Akorn will last.

lol. I don't know how long my Akorn will last but I know I've had cheaper flimsier grills last at least 10 years. Which it actually still works. It's just in my neighbor's backyard now. lol. 

 

I can't imagine why an Akorn would only last 3 years. It's just a metal bowl that you light a fire in. There's not many parts to break.

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I have had my Akorn for a little over 2 years. I have the cover, but I don't use it since my Akorn is in a carport. I also worry that the cover will trap moisture. (I don't know if that is even possible) I empty my ash pan out when it gets  full. No signs of rust or wear and tear at all. Of course, I only use mine 1-2 times a week, so not as high usage as some other people. So, your mileage may vary, but I would expect my Akorn to at least make it another 2-3 years. By then I'm hoping to be able to get a Big Joe.

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I've had my red one for three years, and I leave it outside all year uncovered.  I just dump the ash when I think about it and keep the grates sprayed with canola oil.  The paint is a little oxidized, so it looks a little pink, though.  It has fallen on its face, breaking the handle, and pushing the handle posts back into the dome.  I just hammered it out, and that sucker keeps on cookin'.

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I kinda wonder about this too. However, I have had grills that were much more flimsy and cheap last me for way longer than 3 to 5 years with no extra care. People say you have better control with ceramic, but I don't know. I have had very good success with my TTT and that's only a 30 dollar upgrade. Additionally I was talking to someone I know with a BGE and he was saying he had difficulty keeping it stable at 250. That's not really durability but I also wonder about quality of the food that is produced.

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In 25 years of owning Webers, Brinkmans, and several Chargrillers including the Akorn, I've never had a charcoal grill last more than 4 years.  Usually I am lucky to get 2-3 years out of them.  I guess I am hard on grills.  But as I said, I use them A LOT; and the South Louisiana environment is hard on them I guess. They always rust out.  With the last Akorn, it rusted around the lip of the hood, at the base when the legs connect, and at the metal binders connecting the ash pan to the base.  I don't blame the Akorn though.

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I have had mine for about 4 years now and it's still doing fine. I keep it outside but with a cover and I keep the vents open under the cover. I do see some rust forming on the bottom, where the ash pan attaches but it's nothing bad yet. I haven't decided if I will replace it with another Akorn, or another Kamado Joe, when it finally gets bad. I also use mine for a lot of high temp sears and Pizza cooks, so I am surprised it has held up so well.

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I had my Akorn for 3 years & loved every minute of cooking on it. It lived about 100' from salt water. I couple things I did from the start was to replace the factory bolts & nuts w/ 304 stainless & coated the threads w/ high temp RTV. The base where the legs connected I put synthetic grease on the couplings. I kept it covered when not in use.

Always cleaned out the ash basket after each use & sprayed Pam on the ash basket. 

I sold 3 years later for $250 when I bought a Vision grill at the end of the year close out for $299. The buyer did not believe me that the grill 200+ cooks. I think I could have gotten another 3-5 years out of the Akorn. The Akorn had much more cooking area than the Vision has. 

Because I got use to a larger grill cooking area I went out & bought a Kamado Joe - Big Joe at one at a Costco event last fall.

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