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Can I stain a cutting board ?

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We have a large 2 1/2 " thick Boos cutting board that sets on a central kitchen island. It is really a great board with one  flat side and a deep grooved meat juice moat on the other. It is what they call edge grain, rock maple in natural wood color tone. The wife likes it, but would like to have it's color darker to blend with the kitchen cabinets. The cabinets have a medium cedar stain. Can i stain this thing without damaging it as far as food safe quality goes? If so what type of stain would I want to use?

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 todays modern stains are made with  three different bases... lacquer, oil ,water . three different stains   the problem would be that all three use universal tints same colorants system..  the older stains where linseed oil https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/search?term=food+safe+finish . a natural   safer approach   

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You might be able to but you need to use something called "salad Bowl Finish".  It's a food safe and meant for wood when in contact with food.  I wouldn't personally do it.  You might consider buying a darker board.  The only thing I would ever put on mine would be mineral oil.

Here is an example:

http://www.amazon.com/Behlen-Salad-Bowl-Finish-Quart/dp/B002K9TKV4/ref=pd_sim_79_2?ie=UTF8&dpID=51g8JZ4qdyL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR160%2C160_&refRID=0NT21X1XKHFNAAGCS28Y

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Personally, I would not do it.  That's an expensive board that will only grow more beautiful with use and proper care.  Maybe buy a less expensive, darker board to put on top or to keep out for "display", and use the Boos for the "real" prep?

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Thanks all, that's what i was thinking, but I thought I would check. Going to keep it natural, I use mineral oil and the Boos board cream as it is recommended to prevent bacteria build up. I am expecting it will pick up some color with time and use, 

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Using a double boiler type set up, melt about 5% - 7% of bees wax by volume into food grade mineral oil. It will cool down to a thick yellow paste. Use on cutting boards, wood knife handles and wood bowls.

I have found that this is cheap, easy to make and protects longer than just mineral oil.

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Using a double boiler type set up, melt about 5% - 7% of bees wax by volume into food grade mineral oil. It will cool down to a thick yellow paste. Use on cutting boards, wood knife handles and wood bowls.

I have found that this is cheap, easy to make and protects longer than just mineral oil.

Probably much cheaper to make your own, but that concoction is what Boos board cream is. That is what i currently use

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When I was a kid in NY I used to sometimes go to work for a family friend who owned a butcher shop .It was an old style establishment with saw dust on the floor and a heavy duty butcher block that was free standing on the floor behind the counter .At the end of the day what I remember was applying salt to it and scraping it down with a heavy duty stiff metal brush .Took lots of elbow grease but that was it for maintenance .

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That board should have a mineral oil based finish on it now. Even if it was a good idea, the wood would never take a stain with all the oil already soaked into the grain. If you want a darker color board I would just buy a new one, or if you have the equipment, make your own. My youngest daughter likes purple, so I made her one with maple and purple heart. 

 

 

cuttingboard_zps65ed4847.jpg

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Using a double boiler type set up, melt about 5% - 7% of bees wax by volume into food grade mineral oil. It will cool down to a thick yellow paste. Use on cutting boards, wood knife handles and wood bowls.

I have found that this is cheap, easy to make and protects longer than just mineral oil.

I use that for just about all kitchen wood products (boards, spoons, knife handles, etc), but with more beeswax.

 

I use one of those 1 oz blocks of beeswax, melt it a small sauce pan, then pour in 4 oz of mineral oil and heat/stir until blended. Then, pour and keep in a small wide mouth canning jar.

 

One idea to darken a cutting board, would be to slightly burn it with a torch. You can nicely darken the grain by doing that. Not sure how it would work with a previously waxed board though, and I sure wouldn't try it with an expensive Boos board.

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