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Sous Vide Cooking Forum


John Setzler
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Greetings Gurus!

 

Sous Vide cooking can go hand in hand with Kamado grilling!  There have been lots of great instances of cooking sous vide and finishing the meal on the grill posted here in this forum over the last few months.  Please feel free to use this section of the forum to talk about and highlight your sous vide cooking experiments and questions about the subject.

 

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Nice, thank you, John.

 

I haven't had a lot of opportunity to play around with my SV, but I've enjoyed everything I have done so far.

 

I'll probably make up a double batch of yogurt again this weekend. I've been using a big stock pot as my container, but I might look around for a cheap cooler this weekend to make something a little better.

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Another great sub forum. Even though I don't own a SV yet, I'll get one eventually. Will be watching this with great interest.

I really like how you divided things out lately.

SV cooking.

Pizza and baking.

Dry ageing.

Couldn't have said it better.

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love my sous vide, I own a poly science. I love cooking the meat to temp and than just a cast iron sear and vegetables are the next level 

@PascL - what veggies do you SV? What are your methods?

 

I haven't tried any veggies yet.

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love my sous vide, I own a poly science. I love cooking the meat to temp and than just a cast iron sear and vegetables are the next level

@PascL - what veggies do you SV? What are your methods?

I haven't tried any veggies yet.

I've done corn on the cob and asparagus. I've heard carrots are amazing.

My method for corn and asparagus is ~183 degrees for an hour. Usually with butter and seasoning in the bag.

The hardest thing technique-wise is that at these temps, the typical FoodSaver vacuum isn't strong enough to pull ALL the air out, and at 183 degrees it will expand and make it hard to keep the bags submerged. So you generally need some sort of rack or weighted object to hold them under.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have an Anova and often use clothes line pegs to keep food attached to the side of the saucepan and submerged. Admittedly this is for solid meat type food.

For the Creme brûlée, what about putting some rocks in a sealed separate bag and attaching that to the bottom of the creme brûlée bag?

Must admit I haven't tried sous vide creme brûlée but it sounds fantastic!

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  • 2 months later...

I purchased an adjustable rack from Amazon. It works to hold bags in place that would otherwise tend to float up. You simply adjust the spacing of the racks to securely hold whatever it is you want to cook.

 

Different sizes are available depending on your cooking enclosure.

 

This is what I have:

 http://www.amazon.com/LIPAVI-Sous-Vide-Rack-polycarbonate/dp/B00PKGBMBA?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00

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sorry super late reply. Any root vegetables are fantastic. I usually do with fat of some sort, than finish in a screaming hot pan or on the grill. 

Time depends all on the size you cut them. Usually set pretty high like 80 degrees!

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  • 2 months later...

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