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Sous Vide Cooking Forum


John Setzler
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What's the point of doing a boil in a bag cook on a girl?

Here's a few of them...

Uniformily cooked proteins - especially thick cuts

Flexible timing

Ability to cook to a very precise temperature

Infusing food with fresh herb flavor by incorporating them into the vacuum bag

You're able to take very tough cuts of meat, cook them for many hours (24+) and make them tender

It's fun and has a certain "wow" factor!

A SV cooker is definitely not a necessity...but if mine broke today, I would have a new one tomorrow!

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What's the point of doing a boil in a bag cook on a girl?

Here's a few of them...

Uniformily cooked proteins - especially thick cuts

Flexible timing

Ability to cook to a very precise temperature

Infusing food with fresh herb flavor by incorporating them into the vacuum bag

You're able to take very tough cuts of meat, cook them for many hours (24+) and make them tender

It's fun and has a certain "wow" factor!

A SV cooker is definitely not a necessity...but if mine broke today, I would have a new one tomorrow!

I think one think that might be confusing here. You cook the food in a sealed plastic bag in a precisely controlled waterbath. Then you sear on a hot grill!

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  • 7 months later...
On 1/29/2016 at 10:36 PM, cschaaf said:

I had a helluva time keeping my bagged creme brûlée mix from floating. I tried half the silverware drawer, an upside down bowl, a saucer, spatulas, etc.

I need to find a cooler and a rack that fits inside.

Get small canning mason jars, 4 or 8 oz wide mouth.  I cook my creme brulee sous vide in these, finger tight the lids and also no need to warm the cream and temper the eggs.  Literally, mix cream, yolks, sugar and vanilla.  Pour into cups and sous vide away.  

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  • 11 months later...
On 2/15/2017 at 8:25 PM, Benm3 said:

Get small canning mason jars, 4 or 8 oz wide mouth.  I cook my creme brulee sous vide in these, finger tight the lids and also no need to warm the cream and temper the eggs.  Literally, mix cream, yolks, sugar and vanilla.  Pour into cups and sous vide away.  

I too use the 4oz mason jar method, 181 for an hour.

I've made some with Amaretto (2oz) but I think the next time i would use the entire little airline bottle for more flavor, and I did an egg nog topped with nutmeg, both were awesome.  Next batch Coconut with toasted coconut on top.....

 

Dying to do Cinnamon, but not sure how that would taste

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  • 1 year later...

I've been playing with eggs lately.   The goal is to get the perfect boiled egg with a firm white and a soft custard yoke.  The challenge is that the white cooks at a higher temp than the yoke so to get the desired result you have to precook the white at high heat, then shock chill and sous vide around 145-147........ I haven't quite nailed it yet.    The problem here is the elevation.... like trying to cook a medium rare steak on a grill that isn't hot enough.    I think I now have the answer in an air fryer a neighbor gave me because they just don't use it....... All the rage, appliance of the year, everybody has to have one, and they end up in Salvation  Army stores because people just don't use them, or they don't live up to the hype.   I set out to see what the damn thing was actually good for, and if it was worth the space.     It does a superb job of "boiling" eggs....... or more accurately baking them in the shell.   I do not have to worry about correcting for elevation, as water is not involved.   The challenge is to find the perfect temp and time for a runny soft boiled egg, then to find the ideal sous vide temp and time.... yes time DOES make a difference with eggs.   I've played with 270, for about 10 min....  Less doesn't set the white, but 10 min takes the yoke further than what I want.....   The other problem is the radiant heat.... I need to devise a way to block direct radiant heat so it's just heated air so I won't have to roll them  to avoid browning the white..... steaming at a specific temp would be best for this....

     An interesting challenge for cold winter evenings.............

 

                                                          H.W.

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I've "hard boiled" eggs with my Anova sous vide, @Owly, with good results. I'm roughly at sea level, so I don't have the elevation challenges that you seem to have. Now, I find it convenient to just steam them to perfection. 12 mins or so for perfectly set "hard boiled" large eggs, 15 mins for extra large eggs. I think serious eats has a good article about sous vide eggs (and also steaming eggs) (and also other good articles on sous vide techniques)

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