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Cooking a rack of ribs for dinner tonight and decided to mix up the rubs to see how they compare.

 

Two rubs: Sauer's Pork Rub vs. John Setzler's recipe rub. John's is my standby rub, which I use on ribs, picnic shoulders, turkey drumsticks, etc. I've never tried the Sauer's rub before (Sauer's is the same company that manufactures Duke's mayonnaise, the mayonnaise of the South).

 

The rubs:

 

post-7203-0-97724100-1457381469.jpg

 

And the ribs:

 

post-7203-0-48460300-1457381511.jpg

 

Sauer's rub on the left, John's recipe on the right.

 

post-7203-0-42088600-1457381529.jpg

 

And then onto the Vision:

 

post-7203-0-67639300-1457381574.jpg

 

Back later with updates as the cook progresses.

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Ribs off the grill:

 

post-7203-0-52295300-1457399097.jpg

 

And plated up:

 

post-7203-0-08534800-1457399143.jpg

 

These turned out to be some of the most tender, juicy ribs I've cooked. I think the apple juice helped keep them from drying out too much. Both ribs were good, but the half rack done with John's rub recipe were much tastier than the half rack done with Sauer's rub. All in all a tasty meal!

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those look really good.  I have yet to try John's rub but its very close to my rub recipe which I enjoy.  I have been on the store rub train lately as I like the variety.

 

As for spritzing....

 

I have been doing ribs over the past few years and believe that a 70:30 mix of apple juice to cider vinegar spritz on the hour is a game changer for my rib cooks.  I find that a rib that is spritzed on the hour just tastes juicier and better overall.  I don't mind a bark on some meats, but don't really like the dry texture of a non spritzed rib. 

 

I usually get 4 spritzes in during a rib cook

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