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My 2 cents (which is worth less)

I think subcategories are great for things that have a unique quality that sets themselves apart from "normal cooking" we have a few now, dry aging, Pizza, charcuterie etc and "spinning" would fall into the "unique category"

People who are looking to research these techniques will find it easier going to that category (Dry Aging was great for me)

I am on another BBQ site that has so many subcategories that it's just stupid, such as beef, chicken, lamb and so on.

I think a rotisserie section would be good. I just hope we don't go down the road of having 40 subcategories.

Again, just my input. I have no intention of arguing any points on this. I know this has been a big topic in the past.

First off, let me say I don't mind a separate section.

To play devils advocate here, What value does it add? I am sure it is more work to setup and maintain.

I think the "value" would be having those consolidated and a little easier to find. It's really a different technique and style, with some intricacies and methods that we could all benefit from the shared experience. If I remember seeing something someone cooked, but don't remember the specifics, it would be cool to be able to go to one centralized spot. I use my JoeTisserie on my Vision Classic. I could post that in the Vsion section, the Kamdo Joe section, the Accessories section or the General Kamado cooking section. When Andy or I throw out a Carson Rodizo cook, that is usually going in the "non-Kamado cooking" section for mine, Using my PK grill. Andy's are more on his KJ Classic, but he does some on his Cajun Grill and PK Grill too. CC has posted some crazy cooks on the KK's. I'm sure our new guy with the Caliber will be spinning on his, since he mentioned wanting it with one of his specific wishes being their blaze-basket and rotisserie options.

To me, it's much more about the process than the product you're using to achieve the desired result. I want to see all of these creative cooks in one place to get ideas from to try to copy myself. There's a lot of different ways to do ribs on a rotisserie. People acted like I was crazy for cutting them and tumbling in my hamster wheel. I've done two-bone sections like that on the Carson Rodizio and had great results. I like to think some people will try something similar. I want to try meatballs in the round tumble basket as well, but was hoping someone would blaze that trail ahead of me. I can't remember an accessory being as talked about and anticipated as the JoeTisserie in my few years of cooking like this. People were clamoring for it, and now people are excited about using it. We can all learn from each other, and lean on the people with the most experience to see the light.

I totally agree with the above 2 posts. Rotisserie cooking is a method much different then using a kamado straight up. I'm all for having a rotisserie sub forum.
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I am not a fan of too many sub forums. I do not see the value in a roti sub forum. To be honest what will we post here?? A couple hundred check out my chicken cook photos??

How many trouble shooting posts or how to questions can there be with respect to putting meat on a rod and spinning it??

I personally think it is a waste and not required. It is a cooking technique and has a limited audience

My .2

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I appreciate the suggestion here and it has been considered.  I have had some discussion with the moderators and come to the conclusion that adding a sub section for rotisserie cooking is not something we want to do at this point.  We feel like it would be active initially but that it would slow down significantly after the novelty of the product wears off.  It would also become quite redundant over time.  We believe that the regular kamado cooking forum would be the best place for this type of discussion for now.  If things should change for some reason we would obviously revisit this idea in the future.

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I am not a fan of too many sub forums. I do not see the value in a roti sub forum. To be honest what will we post here?? A couple hundred check out my chicken cook photos??

How many trouble shooting posts or how to questions can there be with respect to putting meat on a rod and spinning it??

I personally think it is a waste and not required. It is a cooking technique and has a limited audience

My .2

With all due respect, I have already seen several different things cooked and done three myself. I don't have any prior experience with a rotisserie, let alone using one in a kamado.

I have have seen several different techniques and cooks using it in videos I've seen so far.

- prime rib roast

- ribs

- chicken - done myself

- pork shoulder - done myself

- pork loin - done myself

It just sparked several questions for me. I figured I could learn from the more experienced users, like yourself.

Some questions I had were:

- What is the benefit or need to push the coals to the back?

...when I did the shoulder I left a small layer of charcoal in the bottom that caught drippings from going all the way through the grate.

- Since it is directly over the fire, what would be the highest temp you should cook at with rubs that have a good amount of sugar in them?

- I followed the recipe (Smoky Ribs) to make sliced pork shoulder to make sandwiches. In the video he cooked to 190. I was wondering if there was a reason it shouldn't be cooked to a pulled pork IT.

- To me, there are a lot more variables and choices to make when cooking something directly over fire that is rotating vs. just throwing some rub on something and smoking it indirect for 12 hours.

- All this to say, every cook I have done and recipe I have followed has been outstanding. Being a newbie at it, I was just wondering what some of the reasons were for things I had seen.

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But those are questions you can ask in the regular sub forums. It wasn't a hit at you in anyway. I am not a fan of too many sub forums. It gets messy and congested.

Rotisserie is a technique and adding that as an entire sub forum makes no sense to me personally.

If we had a sub forum for every cooking technique there would be hundreds of sub forums.

Spinning meat is a trend right now. Much like pizza use to be, turkey during the holidays, baking, dry age, charcuterie, the baked chicken in corn starch etc etc.

The roti cooks will slow down as it becomes common place on the forum like everything else.

I think having a few like Kamado cooks and non Kamado cooking is perfect. But again that is just me.

I like simple

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Bosco, you are a firefighter and I have the upmost respect for people that put their lives in danger for others

Please don't take my remark as a personal attack. I just read the last sentance and then chuckled when I looked at your signature it was a statement that should have not been said

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Not offended at all about the comment.  I am more upset that you called me a firefighter!!! (Police).  

 

That reminds me that it is time to update my signature.... thanks for the reminder

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I am not a fan of too many sub forums. I do not see the value in a roti sub forum. To be honest what will we post here?? A couple hundred check out my chicken cook photos??

How many trouble shooting posts or how to questions can there be with respect to putting meat on a rod and spinning it??

I personally think it is a waste and not required. It is a cooking technique and has a limited audience

My .2

With all due respect, I have already seen several different things cooked and done three myself. I don't have any prior experience with a rotisserie, let alone using one in a kamado.

I have have seen several different techniques and cooks using it in videos I've seen so far.

- prime rib roast

- ribs

- chicken - done myself

- pork shoulder - done myself

- pork loin - done myself

It just sparked several questions for me. I figured I could learn from the more experienced users, like yourself.

Some questions I had were:

- What is the benefit or need to push the coals to the back?

...when I did the shoulder I left a small layer of charcoal in the bottom that caught drippings from going all the way through the grate.

- Since it is directly over the fire, what would be the highest temp you should cook at with rubs that have a good amount of sugar in them?

- I followed the recipe (Smoky Ribs) to make sliced pork shoulder to make sandwiches. In the video he cooked to 190. I was wondering if there was a reason it shouldn't be cooked to a pulled pork IT.

- To me, there are a lot more variables and choices to make when cooking something directly over fire that is rotating vs. just throwing some rub on something and smoking it indirect for 12 hours.

- All this to say, every cook I have done and recipe I have followed has been outstanding. Being a newbie at it, I was just wondering what some of the reasons were for things I had seen.

Regarding the sliced pork shoulder question, I imagine if you cooked it to the same temp as pulled pork, it would not come out in nice slices, it would start to shred or fall apart as you sliced it. 190 is probably hot enough that the meat would be fairly tender.
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But those are questions you can ask in the regular sub forums. It wasn't a hit at you in anyway. I am not a fan of too many sub forums. It gets messy and congested.

Rotisserie is a technique and adding that as an entire sub forum makes no sense to me personally.

If we had a sub forum for every cooking technique there would be hundreds of sub forums.

Spinning meat is a trend right now. Much like pizza use to be, turkey during the holidays, baking, dry age, charcuterie, the baked chicken in corn starch etc etc.

The roti cooks will slow down as it becomes common place on the forum like everything else.

I think having a few like Kamado cooks and non Kamado cooking is perfect. But again that is just me.

I like simple

gotcha ;-)
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I am not a fan of too many sub forums. I do not see the value in a roti sub forum. To be honest what will we post here?? A couple hundred check out my chicken cook photos??

How many trouble shooting posts or how to questions can there be with respect to putting meat on a rod and spinning it??

I personally think it is a waste and not required. It is a cooking technique and has a limited audience

My .2

With all due respect, I have already seen several different things cooked and done three myself. I don't have any prior experience with a rotisserie, let alone using one in a kamado.

I have have seen several different techniques and cooks using it in videos I've seen so far.

- prime rib roast

- ribs

- chicken - done myself

- pork shoulder - done myself

- pork loin - done myself

It just sparked several questions for me. I figured I could learn from the more experienced users, like yourself.

Some questions I had were:

- What is the benefit or need to push the coals to the back?

...when I did the shoulder I left a small layer of charcoal in the bottom that caught drippings from going all the way through the grate.

- Since it is directly over the fire, what would be the highest temp you should cook at with rubs that have a good amount of sugar in them?

- I followed the recipe (Smoky Ribs) to make sliced pork shoulder to make sandwiches. In the video he cooked to 190. I was wondering if there was a reason it shouldn't be cooked to a pulled pork IT.

- To me, there are a lot more variables and choices to make when cooking something directly over fire that is rotating vs. just throwing some rub on something and smoking it indirect for 12 hours.

- All this to say, every cook I have done and recipe I have followed has been outstanding. Being a newbie at it, I was just wondering what some of the reasons were for things I had seen.

Regarding the sliced pork shoulder question, I imagine if you cooked it to the same temp as pulled pork, it would not come out in nice slices, it would start to shred or fall apart as you sliced it. 190 is probably hot enough that the meat would be fairly tender.
I cooked to 190, and it was perfect for making sliced pork for sandwiches. My question was more along the lines of, has anyone ever cooked to an IT for typical pulled pork on a rotisserie? And what were the results. The results from the sliced at 190 only made me wonder because it was so good. I was just thinking let it go longer and pull it.
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