Jump to content

Fire bowl cracked


Dny310
 Share

Recommended Posts

just following up. Crack still there and has not expanded. I did contact Pit-Boss and got the typical answer about being normal blah blah blah. 

 

The fire bowl still solid and even with the crack is does not affect functionality. I have moved the fire bowl a bit to adjust it it and it remains in one piece. I still love this grill and still use it 2-3 times per week. Just smoked some brisket and ribs for mother's day. It was very easy to keep and maintain the temperature at 225 for 8.5 hours. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just following up. Crack still there and has not expanded. I did contact Pit-Boss and got the typical answer about being normal blah blah blah.

The fire bowl still solid and even with the crack is does not affect functionality. I have moved the fire bowl a bit to adjust it it and it remains in one piece. I still love this grill and still use it 2-3 times per week. Just smoked some brisket and ribs for mother's day. It was very easy to keep and maintain the temperature at 225 for 8.5 hours.

Hi Dny. Just as an aside, how did you light the fire, what fuel, and how mich did you use to get the temp stable to 225. I'm still new to the Pit Boss and experimenting, but finding it tough to get the temp that low, despite looking at tons of videos!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just following up. Crack still there and has not expanded. I did contact Pit-Boss and got the typical answer about being normal blah blah blah.

The fire bowl still solid and even with the crack is does not affect functionality. I have moved the fire bowl a bit to adjust it it and it remains in one piece. I still love this grill and still use it 2-3 times per week. Just smoked some brisket and ribs for mother's day. It was very easy to keep and maintain the temperature at 225 for 8.5 hours.

Hi Dny. Just as an aside, how did you light the fire, what fuel, and how mich did you use to get the temp stable to 225. I'm still new to the Pit Boss and experimenting, but finding it tough to get the temp that low, despite looking at tons of videos!

Have you added any gasket to seal up the dampers? If not, see the review thread.

It is a lot easier to keep the temp low than it is to cool it off once it gets too hot. Use whatever method you want to light a small amount of the charcoal, and be ready to start shutting the vents down but time the temp hits 175 or so. To run at 225, my top vent is a bit under 1, and the bottom vent is barely open. Maybe 1/8" to 1/4".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just following up. Crack still there and has not expanded. I did contact Pit-Boss and got the typical answer about being normal blah blah blah.

The fire bowl still solid and even with the crack is does not affect functionality. I have moved the fire bowl a bit to adjust it it and it remains in one piece. I still love this grill and still use it 2-3 times per week. Just smoked some brisket and ribs for mother's day. It was very easy to keep and maintain the temperature at 225 for 8.5 hours.

Hi Dny. Just as an aside, how did you light the fire, what fuel, and how mich did you use to get the temp stable to 225. I'm still new to the Pit Boss and experimenting, but finding it tough to get the temp that low, despite looking at tons of videos!
Have you added any gasket to seal up the dampers? If not, see the review thread.

It is a lot easier to keep the temp low than it is to cool it off once it gets too hot. Use whatever method you want to light a small amount of the charcoal, and be ready to start shutting the vents down but time the temp hits 175 or so. To run at 225, my top vent is a bit under 1, and the bottom vent is barely open. Maybe 1/8" to 1/4".

Great, thanks for that. Yes, I made the vent mod with gasket tape. I think I have been lighting too quickly, and I'll try to get larger lumpwood chunks too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

just following up. Crack still there and has not expanded. I did contact Pit-Boss and got the typical answer about being normal blah blah blah.

The fire bowl still solid and even with the crack is does not affect functionality. I have moved the fire bowl a bit to adjust it it and it remains in one piece. I still love this grill and still use it 2-3 times per week. Just smoked some brisket and ribs for mother's day. It was very easy to keep and maintain the temperature at 225 for 8.5 hours.

Hi Dny. Just as an aside, how did you light the fire, what fuel, and how mich did you use to get the temp stable to 225. I'm still new to the Pit Boss and experimenting, but finding it tough to get the temp that low, despite looking at tons of videos!

Have you added any gasket to seal up the dampers? If not, see the review thread.

It is a lot easier to keep the temp low than it is to cool it off once it gets too hot. Use whatever method you want to light a small amount of the charcoal, and be ready to start shutting the vents down but time the temp hits 175 or so. To run at 225, my top vent is a bit under 1, and the bottom vent is barely open. Maybe 1/8" to 1/4".

 

 

I use these fire starters http://www.amazon.com/Rutland-Safe-Starter-Squares-144-Square/dp/B00138MO16/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1462809536&sr=8-1&keywords=safelite+fire+starter+squares

 

I use two of them one near each end of the firebowl, and then put some lumps on top of them. For this smoke I light them up, and just open the top and lower vents all the way for about 20-30 minutes at which points the temp was at around 180. I then put some wood chips and a few wood chucks so by opening the lid the fire started going a bit stronger. After closing it I also closed both vents to the number 1 and let the temp settle for a few minutes before putting on my meats. At around 200-220 I place the mean and close the vents leaving only a very small opening both at the top and bottom. The temperature settle nicely at around 220-230 on reaching 250 a few times while I had to mess with the meat for a long period of time. 

 

I dont have the lower vend mod, but I have noticed that the wind direction plays a huge role on controlling temperatures. On a windy day I opened the lower vent all the way up and allowing the wind to heat up my the grill to about 500-550 for some pizza. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just following up. Crack still there and has not expanded. I did contact Pit-Boss and got the typical answer about being normal blah blah blah. 

 

The fire bowl still solid and even with the crack is does not affect functionality. I have moved the fire bowl a bit to adjust it it and it remains in one piece. I still love this grill and still use it 2-3 times per week. Just smoked some brisket and ribs for mother's day. It was very easy to keep and maintain the temperature at 225 for 8.5 hours. 

 

I just discovered a hairline crack in the same location.

Given the number of identical reports of this, I would have to conclude that it is, in fact, an important "thermal stress-relieving design feature".  ;-)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

just following up. Crack still there and has not expanded. I did contact Pit-Boss and got the typical answer about being normal blah blah blah.

The fire bowl still solid and even with the crack is does not affect functionality. I have moved the fire bowl a bit to adjust it it and it remains in one piece. I still love this grill and still use it 2-3 times per week. Just smoked some brisket and ribs for mother's day. It was very easy to keep and maintain the temperature at 225 for 8.5 hours.

Hi Dny. Just as an aside, how did you light the fire, what fuel, and how mich did you use to get the temp stable to 225. I'm still new to the Pit Boss and experimenting, but finding it tough to get the temp that low, despite looking at tons of videos!
Have you added any gasket to seal up the dampers? If not, see the review thread.

It is a lot easier to keep the temp low than it is to cool it off once it gets too hot. Use whatever method you want to light a small amount of the charcoal, and be ready to start shutting the vents down but time the temp hits 175 or so. To run at 225, my top vent is a bit under 1, and the bottom vent is barely open. Maybe 1/8" to 1/4".

Great, thanks for that. Yes, I made the vent mod with gasket tape. I think I have been lighting too quickly, and I'll try to get larger lumpwood chunks too.

 

 

Do NOT use whatever method of lighting the charcoal, as in never use lighter fluid EVER in a Kamado.

I would highly suggest that you buy a Weed Torch and a small 20lb propane tank and use that to light the charcoal.

You can get your coals going with zero fumes nothing to burn off and takes all of 30 seconds.

 

A full tank should last all year and cost about $8 to refill.

You can get a Weed Torch from Harbor Freight for $20 and a propane tank for about $25.

 

http://www.harborfreight.com/propane-torch-91033.html

 

 

You can just leave the bottom vent wide open at all times unless you are trying to slow (cold smoke) chipotle peppers for like 16 hours at 150 degrees or less you might have to close the bottom vent a bit to keep it that low. For the most part, the top vent is the only one that really adjust the heat at all.

 

But for 225 degrees light the charcoal in 2-3 spots, add your wood chunks, open the bottom vent wide open close lid and just crack it about an 1/8" or so, on the Vision that is about 75-80% of the number 1 on the top damper dial but either way, just crack it about 1/8" to maybe 3/16th" it should get to about 175-190 in a minute or so since the coals are already nice and hot from the weed torch.

The last 25-30 degrees should be about 5-10 minutes and it should settle right in at 225.

You may have to play with it a bit to get it exactly right for you particular grill, best to start at just a crack let the temp rise to where it stabilizes, so lets say on your grill that is 210, then just barely tap it open from the 1/8th to 3/16ths and let it sit.

Once you get the exact location and as long as you are using the same type of charcoal then just put a tiny mark on your damper for 225.

Then you can start the charcoal, open bottom vent, close lid, set it to that mark and basically walk away, usually within 15-20 minutes tops you got nice blue smoke flying out the top vent and you are ready to smoke.

When I do a pork butt I usually wake up at 6:30am and I am back in bed with the pork butt on and smoking by 7am.

 

Also adjusting the heat with top vent only allows a bit more moisture to remain under the dome.

 

 

post-8283-0-36248800-1462982457_thumb.jp

 

post-8283-0-01736600-1462982480_thumb.jp

post-8283-0-42948700-1462983200_thumb.jp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A cracked firebox isn't the end of the world. Lots of Gurus cook with cracked fireboxes. A crack is nothing more than a sign that some thermal stress was relieved and once the stress is gone, no big deal. As long as the firebox maintains its integrity, you can continue to use them. However, some fireboxes will continue to crack and eventually become unusable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just found it irritating that it cracked after so little use. These things have been around forever and I think the bugs should have been worked out by now. A cast iron firebox sounds interesting to me. I wonder if anyone has made their own? Or used steel?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just found it irritating that it cracked after so little use. These things have been around forever and I think the bugs should have been worked out by now. A cast iron firebox sounds interesting to me. I wonder if anyone has made their own? Or used steel?

Be careful of what you wish for! Think what happens when you drop that heavy cast iron firebox onto the bottom of your ceramic cooker! That'll be the last time that cooker is used by you.

Cracked fireboxes are no big deal and fireboxes have been cracking for a very long time. You can't get around the laws of physics; they are immutable. Now if you really want to make some serious money, create a firebox that doesn't crack, that's useable, priced right, patentable, and license that puppy to manufacturers. Make certain you also have the deep pockets and long arms to enforce your patent rights. Intellectual property rights attorneys aren't cheap!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...