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17010694856_6e720d0432_b.jpg

 

In my other post, I was  asked if I would post the recipe for this. It is not mine but is based on Rick Bayless's recipe. I tweaked the cooking method and adjusted for 8.5 lbs. of pork. The pictures below the recipe were from last years cook and are there to give you a better idea of how I cooked it. (I apologize in advance for the length of this post)

Here are the ingredients for the marinade and the pickled onion:
16408699754_075ff78784_z.jpg
Marinate:
4 tbsp. (about 2 ounces) achiote seeds / powder
1 tbsp. dried oregano, preferably Mexican
1 tbsp. black pepper (preferably fresh ground)
1 tsp. cumin (preferably fresh ground)
½ tsp. cloves (preferably fresh ground)
1 tbsp. cinnamon (preferably Mexican canela and fresh ground)
10 garlic cloves
¾ tbsp. Salt
1-1/4 cups fresh sour orange juice OR 1 cups fresh lime juice plus 1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 large (8.5 lb.) pork shoulder
1 lb. package of banana leaves

(Note: Some add peppers to the marinate but I don't as my wife and MIL don't like the heat. It tastes great without it and you can always add any kind of heat / salsa to it later as Rick mentions)

Directions: Measure the achiote seeds or powder and oregano into a spice grinder, adding the black pepper, cumin, cloves and cinnamon, and run the grinder until everything’s as powdery as you can get it (you may need to work in batches). In a blender, combine the ground mixture with the salt, the garlic and sour orange juice (or lime juice plus orange juice). Blend until smooth—there should be very little grittiness when a little is rubbed between your fingers. If you’re working ahead, pour the mixture into a non-aluminum container, cover, refrigerate 6 hours or longer. Before using, blend the mixture again to give it an even smoother texture. (The long steeping and second blending isn’t absolutely essential, though without it the marinade may be a little gritty.)

Here's a link to Rick Bayless's recipe: http://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/cochinita-pibil/

Pickled Red Onion: (From Rick Bayless’s recipe but I tweaked it and adjusted it for 2 onions)
2 large red onions, sliced 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick
1 ½ cups fresh sour orange juice OR 1 cup fresh lime juice plus ½ cup fresh orange juice
2 tbsp. white vinegar
1 tsp. salt
1 habanero cut in half (If desired)

Directions: While the meat is cooking, prepare the onions. Scoop the onions into a non-aluminum bowl. Pour boiling water over them, wait 30 to 45 seconds, then pour the onions into a strainer. Return the drained onions to the bowl, pour on the sour orange juice (or the lime-orange combo) and stir in 1 teaspoons salt. Add 1 habanero cut in half if you want a little heat. (Hint: it doesn't add that much) Cover and set aside until serving time.

Here is an 8.5 lb. pork shoulder
16408696284_b3da3fc82e_z.jpg
I trimmed most of the fat cap off and then scored it on both sides.
17030261391_4f44f9e8f5_z.jpg
I mixed up the ingredients for the marinate and poured it over the pork on one side and then the other.
16843592210_04dc0c3a0b_z.jpg
I covered it with foil and let it rest in the fridge overnight. In the morning I started prepping the banana leaves to get them more pliable by heating them up in the oven.

I place 2 sheets of wide aluminum foil in opposite directions.
16411727094_c2c07b5b0e_z.jpg
On top of this I place 2 sheets of parchment paper in the opposite directions of the foil.
16846355098_9f844b1db7_z.jpg
And now I place on some banana leaves. I overlap all the joints by a good 3 to 4 inches and alternate the direction of the leaves to try and minimize leakage.
17034146315_8389244616_z.jpg

16846610040_b7053366d6_z.jpg
Now I can wrap up the pork shoulder in the banana leaves and tie with butcher’s twine. (Note: This is much harder than you’d think. Try to have someone there to help tie the knots in the twine.)
17034142935_4f752fc04a_z.jpg

16846347568_42ebfc62de_z.jpg

17008143206_f7966ffb6a_z.jpg

16847914129_2d014aedfa_z.jpg
Then parchment paper and finally the aluminum foil. (Wow! I could work in the shipping department. icon_lol.gif)
16411713934_06b9dccc0e_z.jpg
OK I now light start up the kamado with a full load of lump and set it up for indirect cooking.
16411711504_e12a647121_z.jpg
Once it gets up to 325 I put on the Cochinita Pibil package. Let it get up to 350.
17034131825_ae244801c3_z.jpg
I going to check it in 4 1/2 hours to see how things are going.
While I’m waiting I made up some Pickled Red Onion and some fresh tortillas.
16850125779_71ec966aff_z.jpg

16413934284_5eca0beef9_z.jpg

16848569328_0629b997e0_z.jpg
Was able to relax a little and then checked the I.T. of the meat.
16850489889_f528039501_z.jpg
Yes! Now I carefully unwrap my package.
16829299347_a8b9656c0e_z.jpg
And transfer it to an aluminum pan.
16416545883_a43491d3ba_z.jpg
And continue unwrapping. OH IT’S JUST LIKE CHRISTMAS!
17010694856_6e720d0432_z.jpg
Fish out all the banana leaves
17036657435_3f0a1f4624_z.jpg
And the bone
16850433639_21aa64a5fe_z.jpg
And pull the meat. It was literally so tender that I could’ve just stirred it with a spoon and it would’ve fallen apart.
16414216944_b6674aaf8b_z.jpg

16416480773_fdcd247c00_z.jpg

16829145017_ee278e7eff_z.jpg
And now for the moment of truth! Here it is plated in some tacos with some Tostones appetizers, radishes and guacamole and chips.
16416435583_f9b842b62d_b.jpg
Off the charts goodness!

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  • 3 months later...

17010694856_6e720d0432_b.jpg

 

In my other post, I was  asked if I would post the recipe for this. It is not mine but is based on Rick Bayless's recipe. I tweaked the cooking method and adjusted for 8.5 lbs. of pork. The pictures below the recipe were from last years cook and are there to give you a better idea of how I cooked it. (I apologize in advance for the length of this post)

Here are the ingredients for the marinade and the pickled onion:

16408699754_075ff78784_z.jpg

Marinate:

4 tbsp. (about 2 ounces) achiote seeds / powder

1 tbsp. dried oregano, preferably Mexican

1 tbsp. black pepper (preferably fresh ground)

1 tsp. cumin (preferably fresh ground)

½ tsp. cloves (preferably fresh ground)

1 tbsp. cinnamon (preferably Mexican canela and fresh ground)

10 garlic cloves

¾ tbsp. Salt

1-1/4 cups fresh sour orange juice OR 1 cups fresh lime juice plus 1/2 cup fresh orange juice

1 large (8.5 lb.) pork shoulder

1 lb. package of banana leaves

(Note: Some add peppers to the marinate but I don't as my wife and MIL don't like the heat. It tastes great without it and you can always add any kind of heat / salsa to it later as Rick mentions)

Directions: Measure the achiote seeds or powder and oregano into a spice grinder, adding the black pepper, cumin, cloves and cinnamon, and run the grinder until everything’s as powdery as you can get it (you may need to work in batches). In a blender, combine the ground mixture with the salt, the garlic and sour orange juice (or lime juice plus orange juice). Blend until smooth—there should be very little grittiness when a little is rubbed between your fingers. If you’re working ahead, pour the mixture into a non-aluminum container, cover, refrigerate 6 hours or longer. Before using, blend the mixture again to give it an even smoother texture. (The long steeping and second blending isn’t absolutely essential, though without it the marinade may be a little gritty.)

Here's a link to Rick Bayless's recipe: http://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/cochinita-pibil/

Pickled Red Onion: (From Rick Bayless’s recipe but I tweaked it and adjusted it for 2 onions)

2 large red onions, sliced 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick

1 ½ cups fresh sour orange juice OR 1 cup fresh lime juice plus ½ cup fresh orange juice

2 tbsp. white vinegar

1 tsp. salt

1 habanero cut in half (If desired)

Directions: While the meat is cooking, prepare the onions. Scoop the onions into a non-aluminum bowl. Pour boiling water over them, wait 30 to 45 seconds, then pour the onions into a strainer. Return the drained onions to the bowl, pour on the sour orange juice (or the lime-orange combo) and stir in 1 teaspoons salt. Add 1 habanero cut in half if you want a little heat. (Hint: it doesn't add that much) Cover and set aside until serving time.

Here is an 8.5 lb. pork shoulder

16408696284_b3da3fc82e_z.jpg

I trimmed most of the fat cap off and then scored it on both sides.

17030261391_4f44f9e8f5_z.jpg

I mixed up the ingredients for the marinate and poured it over the pork on one side and then the other.

16843592210_04dc0c3a0b_z.jpg

I covered it with foil and let it rest in the fridge overnight. In the morning I started prepping the banana leaves to get them more pliable by heating them up in the oven.

I place 2 sheets of wide aluminum foil in opposite directions.

16411727094_c2c07b5b0e_z.jpg

On top of this I place 2 sheets of parchment paper in the opposite directions of the foil.

16846355098_9f844b1db7_z.jpg

And now I place on some banana leaves. I overlap all the joints by a good 3 to 4 inches and alternate the direction of the leaves to try and minimize leakage.

17034146315_8389244616_z.jpg

16846610040_b7053366d6_z.jpg

Now I can wrap up the pork shoulder in the banana leaves and tie with butcher’s twine. (Note: This is much harder than you’d think. Try to have someone there to help tie the knots in the twine.)

17034142935_4f752fc04a_z.jpg

16846347568_42ebfc62de_z.jpg

17008143206_f7966ffb6a_z.jpg

16847914129_2d014aedfa_z.jpg

Then parchment paper and finally the aluminum foil. (Wow! I could work in the shipping department. icon_lol.gif)

16411713934_06b9dccc0e_z.jpg

OK I now light start up the kamado with a full load of lump and set it up for indirect cooking.

16411711504_e12a647121_z.jpg

Once it gets up to 325 I put on the Cochinita Pibil package. Let it get up to 350.

17034131825_ae244801c3_z.jpg

I going to check it in 4 1/2 hours to see how things are going.

While I’m waiting I made up some Pickled Red Onion and some fresh tortillas.

16850125779_71ec966aff_z.jpg

16413934284_5eca0beef9_z.jpg

16848569328_0629b997e0_z.jpg

Was able to relax a little and then checked the I.T. of the meat.

16850489889_f528039501_z.jpg

Yes! Now I carefully unwrap my package.

16829299347_a8b9656c0e_z.jpg

And transfer it to an aluminum pan.

16416545883_a43491d3ba_z.jpg

And continue unwrapping. OH IT’S JUST LIKE CHRISTMAS!

17010694856_6e720d0432_z.jpg

Fish out all the banana leaves

17036657435_3f0a1f4624_z.jpg

And the bone

16850433639_21aa64a5fe_z.jpg

And pull the meat. It was literally so tender that I could’ve just stirred it with a spoon and it would’ve fallen apart.

16414216944_b6674aaf8b_z.jpg

16416480773_fdcd247c00_z.jpg

16829145017_ee278e7eff_z.jpg

And now for the moment of truth! Here it is plated in some tacos with some Tostones appetizers, radishes and guacamole and chips.

16416435583_f9b842b62d_b.jpg

Off the charts goodness!

I don't know how I cam across this post, but my God does that look good!

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  • 2 years later...
  • 3 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

You did the recipe proud, DerHusker.

 

Interestingly, cochinita pibil has become something of a 4th of July tradition for my family - I'm going to try some the techniques you've incorporated into my next cook, especially the tight packaging and the scoring.

 

I first had this dish in Playa del Carmen and became obsessed a) finding the best CP in the area and b) recreating it once I returned home. One addition I might offer up as an addition is a bright and spicy salsa we found served at several of the establishments in the Yucatan that served CP. It pairs really well with the richness of the pork:

 

Xnipec Salsa
1 lime, juiced, more if the lime is not juicy, or small
half a medium red onion, diced
1 habanero, diced fine, seeds removed it less heat is desired
2 pinches salt, more to taste
 
Combine ingredients in a bowl and let sit for an hour. The lime "ceviches" the onion and hab, making what would be an insanely hot sauce somewhat subdued and 10x tastier. It also serves as a great base for guacamole; just add some garlic salt and you're done. 
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  • 1 month later...

Looks amazing- i wonder if you cooked it uncovered like a regular butt until 155 temp- then wrap it in banana leaves for the rest of the cook, if that would add that good ole kj smoke. I see an experiment looming... had these on tacos for lunch and I can’t stop thinking about them lol!

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  • 8 months later...

This is one of my favorite dishes. I too discovered it in he Yucatán. I found a local restaurant that does it on Saturdays.  I have yet to try and make it, but you sure made it look good.  Thanks for the mouth watering post. 
 

Butch

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  • 3 weeks later...

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