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Surface for Pizza Making


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Hi Guys,

I've been using a large marble pasty board for making my pizzas so far. It works decently but the marble has some challenges when lifting the pizza off with a peel. I'm considering making a pizza making surface out of Canadian Maple.

I was wondering what kinds of surfaces everyone else is using for pizza making masterpieces?

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I use regular aluminum pizza pans to form my pizzas. I put the whole thing in the kamado for a few minutes before pulling out the pan from under the pizza.

The advantages are:

1) no mess or problems transferring the uncooked pizza to the grill.

2) you can have prepare several pizzas in advance on multiple pans to cycle them through in short order.

3) having a pan under the cooking pizza at first gives you better control over how well the crust is done versus the toppings just by changing the time you wait before pulling the pan. No blackened bottoms for example while the top isn't yet done.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I worked for godfather's pizza as a teen. Learned to flip dough. Have done it many times in the kitchen, but without a peel.

 

I haven't used the Vsion for pizza just yet, but will very soon.

 

I don't see why I couldn't just flip it to size and place directly on the floured or corn mealed peel to build. 

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These things are the bee's knees for Pizza Pie. You roll the dough on the mat, then flip it upside down and the dough falls onto your peel. It's 'da Bomb!.....

 

http://www.amazon.com/Silpat-AE420295-07-Premium-Non-Stick-Silicone/dp/B00008T960?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00 

 

post-3565-0-87667000-1460652015_thumb.jp

 

 

....btw, they roll up for easy storage!!! You can also use them for prepping all Breads and Pastrys.

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Yeah, I am with Andy, I use an extra large silicone mat from Crate and Barrel for working the dough. I put bench flour on top of the mat and dough and work it to make a ball. When I actually make the pies I make them directly on top of floured 13" parchment rounds that is place on top of the mat. If I am making multiple pizzas for a gathering or just a couple, I transfer the parchment pies (when they are  fully built) to and aluminum pizza pan, one for each pie as i have several. I do not cook the pies on the aluminum pans but use them to transfer the pies into a cleared out fridge and then to the pizza stone. When i do a pizza party I like to have all my pies pre made and sitting in the fridge before I start my fire. Then I can devote myself to tending the fire and my wife brings out the pies on or two at a time when I am up to temp and heat soaked. When they are cooked she takes them on the peel and cuts them. I alway cut the first pie into much smaller appetizer pieces and distribute them to the folks standing around the kamado. Seems like when you make pizza everyone enjoys standing around the kamado sipping a wine or beer, munching on pizza, watching the cook. 

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These things are the bee's knees for Pizza Pie. You roll the dough on the mat, then flip it upside down and the dough falls onto your peel. It's 'da Bomb!.....

http://www.amazon.com/Silpat-AE420295-07-Premium-Non-Stick-Silicone/dp/B00008T960?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

attachicon.gif81GjYqUgW0L__SL1494_.jpg

....btw, they roll up for easy storage!!! You can also use them for prepping all Breads and Pastrys.

I'm leaning towards making my own maple board as a work surface. I will look at the silicone mats too. How you guys scrape the pie off of the silicone mat? I would think you would have to make the pizza on the peel if your using a silicone mat.

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Roll out on my granite table, roll it up onto the pin (a 2" diameter 20" long dowel rod) and transfer it to parchment paper for dressing. The paper makes it super easy to move around on the peel or any other flat pan/cutting board if needed.

 

It bakes half way (~ 3-4 minutes) on the paper, then I rotate 180 degrees and pull the paper to finish baking directly on the stone.

 

I've tried corn meal and flour, both work OK but create messes.

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I'm leaning towards making my own maple board as a work surface. I will look at the silicone mats too. How you guys scrape the pie off of the silicone mat? I would think you would have to make the pizza on the peel if your using a silicone mat.

 

 

Just flip the mat upside down over the pizza peel, and the rolled out pizza dough will slide of the mat.

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I'm leaning towards making my own maple board as a work surface. I will look at the silicone mats too. How you guys scrape the pie off of the silicone mat? I would think you would have to make the pizza on the peel if your using a silicone mat.

 

Just flip the mat upside down over the pizza peel, and the rolled out pizza dough will slide of the mat.

I figured there had to be a trick. I couldn't image scraping the pizza off with a pizza peel.

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