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Wildwr

First Pizza on the Pit Boss

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Last night was my first attempt at pizza on my new Pit Boss.

All I can really say is: It was amazing!!!!

 

So here we go:

Set-up:

  • Pit Boss factory deflector legs down
  • Both racks installed
  • Pampered chef pizza stone on top rack
  • 550 F
  • lower vent: one mark from wide open (3/4 open)
  • Top vent: wide open

So I picked up fresh dough from grocery store and spent a fortune at the anti-pasta bar on sun-dried tomatoes, artichoke, olives. etc...

Prepped my first pizza with keeping dough really thin on my wooden pizza peel.

 

With my Kamado cruising at 550F I sprinkled some corn meal on pizza stone and threw the pizza on.

Since this was my first pizza, I decided to use a timer to get a feel for things.

At the 5 minute mark I took a peak and it was almost there.

Closed the lid and decided in an attempt to raise the deck temperature to finish off the top of pizza, 
I closed the top vent to just slighter below 1 for an additional minute or 2 and the pizza top finished off perfectly.

 

It was such a success in my house I ended up making 2 more pizzas.

 

For those wondering about the corn meal, well I've been doing this for years.

It serves a couple purposes;  it creates a small layer between stone. So if you have any hot-spots the Pizza is easy to spin around.  It also reduces the chance of burning the bottom of pizza in the event your too hot or leave it too long.  Try it out!

 

Hope you enjoy the pictures.

 

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post-10986-0-66232500-1463655081_thumb.j

post-10986-0-27633800-1463655095_thumb.j

post-10986-0-30402100-1463655107_thumb.j

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Great looking pizza.

 

I use just bread flower on the peel and it slides off no problems and the base is great. I tried cornmeal but felt it has a taste that isnt that of a traditional pizza

 

That might just be me..

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Great looking pizza.

 

I use just bread flower on the peel and it slides off no problems and the base is great. I tried cornmeal but felt it has a taste that isnt that of a traditional pizza

 

That might just be me..

 

I also use flour on the peel which makes for easy transfer to stone.

 

One thing I forgot to mention,  is the use of a metal perforated pizza pan after the pizza is finished cooking.

Due to the intense heat very little moisture can escape.

So placing a hot pizza on a solid surface after the cook usually results in soggy crust just after a couple minutes of resting.

Using a perforated surface allows moisture to escape resulting in a crispy crust even after the pizza as cooled off.

 

 

post-10986-0-40378000-1463660650_thumb.j

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Great looking pizza.

 

I use just bread flower on the peel and it slides off no problems and the base is great. I tried cornmeal but felt it has a taste that isnt that of a traditional pizza

 

That might just be me..

I also use flour on the peel which makes for easy transfer to stone.  Only use cornmeal on the stone.

 

what is benefot of cornmeal on stone mine hasnt stcu once to th stone...

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Great looking pizza.

 

I use just bread flower on the peel and it slides off no problems and the base is great. I tried cornmeal but felt it has a taste that isnt that of a traditional pizza

 

That might just be me..

I also use flour on the peel which makes for easy transfer to stone.  Only use cornmeal on the stone.

 

what is benefot of cornmeal on stone mine hasnt stcu once to th stone...

 

Cornmeal is just a preference based on my experience with BBQ'd pizza.

What I discovered is your less likely to accidentally burn base of pizza as its a this barrier from direct stone heat.

 

Also worth mentioning,  I visited an Italian Pizzeria once that used to throw cornmeal on the cooking surface of their wood fired pizza oven and I really liked the added texture it added. 

Remember its just a light sprinkle not a solid layer of cornmeal.

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I really want to do this soon but I don't have a deflector plate.  Do you think that it is really necessary? Do you think I could getaway with just using just a pizzastone?

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I really want to do this soon but I don't have a deflector plate. Do you think that it is really necessary? Do you think I could getaway with just using just a pizzastone?

That is going to depend on your stone. I have a really thick pizza stone so I don't use a deflector. Most normal store bought stones will benefit from a deflect since they are generally thin stones.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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I really want to do this soon but I don't have a deflector plate. Do you think that it is really necessary? Do you think I could getaway with just using just a pizzastone?

That is going to depend on your stone. I have a really thick pizza stone so I don't use a deflector. Most normal store bought stones will benefit from a deflect since they are generally thin stones.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

 

I agree with ckreef,

I believe the stone thickness is the determination on whether to use a deflector or not.

Keeping in mind not all stones are designed for the direct high heat a Kamado produces, so a safe bet would be to use a deflector,

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Great looking pizza.

 

I use just bread flower on the peel and it slides off no problems and the base is great. I tried cornmeal but felt it has a taste that isnt that of a traditional pizza

 

That might just be me..

 

I also use flour on the peel which makes for easy transfer to stone.

 

One thing I forgot to mention,  is the use of a metal perforated pizza pan after the pizza is finished cooking.

Due to the intense heat very little moisture can escape.

So placing a hot pizza on a solid surface after the cook usually results in soggy crust just after a couple minutes of resting.

Using a perforated surface allows moisture to escape resulting in a crispy crust even after the pizza as cooled off.

 

 

 

Great tip. I've been making pizza for years and didn't know that one. Thx.

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