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Anyone use a pressure cooker?

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I have a 10qt Fagor ive had for over 5 years. Used it a few times for its pressure cooking abilities. Will cook tough cuts of meat quickly but after doing a 14 hr brisket even 4 hours seems like a breeze.

I use it mostly as a big 10 qt pot and don't even seal the lid.


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I just bought a pressure canner/cooker (Presto)so I thought I'd give this thread a bump.  In Newfoundland bottled moose in something done in many households.  It's a great way to make use of the tougher cuts of meat among other things.  A lot of Newfoundlandr's have remote cabins so convenient meals are often needed.  Bottled moose fits the bill.

 

There are a good many posts on NL bottled moose all of which oppose the the most basic food guidelines on meat preservation.   In any event I've been bottling beef chuck, a really tough strip loin, soup and beans.  The beef is so tender and tasty I can't believe how good it is.  I have a cabin neighbour whole bottles seal, fish, vegetables and of course moose.  His carrots are some of the best I've ever had.  Looking forward to trying some chicken and pork.  Anyone out there with any good recipes?  I have several in my Presto manual and have been surfing the net as well.

 

 

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Yes. I use  the InstaPot.  Tried some pressure cooker recipe books, and most may not have been kitchen tested or the had some obscure ingredient or both.... I use the books for recipe ideas and my personal cooking experience to fill the gaps.

 

My best recipes originate come right off the InstaPot website, which is pretty good.

 

Potatoes and brown/white rice come out really well.

 

M.

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On 7/13/2016 at 10:10 AM, Marty said:

 

When under pressure the new ones lock and can not be opened.

Yup.  My wife goes on about split green pea soup, from her grandmothers stove top pressure cooker, on the ceiling from 30 years ago. The new equipment is so safe and fool proof.

 

 

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I've heard those same stories about people having bad experiences.  So far I've followed the directions in the manual and the canner has preformed exactly as described.  

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I've got the Fago Duo 8 quart referred to in the video above and while we don't use it very oftem, when we do, we find ourselves saying we need to use this thing more often. Our use for it is soups, like split pea and New England boiled dinner (ham, potatoes and cabbage). We grew up with the old fashioned pressure cooker with the "jiggle me nop" doohickey on top whick could prove dangerous. The newer ones like the Fagor I have completely eliminates that feature and is fairly silent in operation.

 

Would I buy one all over again? Probably not, but I am glad I have it in my arsenal. It proves itself over and over again when we need something cooked quickly and thoroughly. Gonna use it today for some pea soup.

 

There's one test I often think about but have never done and that is to make 2 batches of split pea soup; one in the pressure cooker and the other in the slow cooker. Timing issues aside I wonder if the end product produces identical results.

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14 hours ago, mike echo said:

Yup.  My wife goes on about split green pea soup, from her grandmothers stove top pressure cooker, on the ceiling from 30 years ago. The new equipment is so safe and fool proof.

 

 

The thought of opening one of those under pressure scares the heck out of me. That could be really dangerous. That is why if using an old one i would remove the weight and depressurize immediately when done. I have never been scared of them. All of the ones that I have seen have a emergency release so that they can not explode. BUT removing the lid under pressure-----

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On 10/18/2016 at 0:38 PM, smoker08 said:

I did a lot or research before I bought mine and came up with SEVERAL FACTS THAT CAN'T BE DENIED OR CHANGED

1. If you think you will be canning you need to get the best stove top one you can afford. All American (Amazon)

This is the defacto standard for pressure cookers. Get the extra pressure knobs for the different pressures you need.

2. Electrics may say they can can but the pressures they attain probably won't be high enough for meat canning.

3. If you get a stove top pressure cooker you have to stay close to be able to react at a moments notice to cool it down. If you day dream or like to listen to music or TV loud then this type might not be for you. The electrics are more a set and forget (within reason).

4. If you are an OCD type, pressure cookers will be more up your alley. If you don't like to follow directions and like to wing it on your own, then I would stay clear of  stove top pressure cookers and canning in my opinion.

5. I picked up an electric el cheapo last year after Christmas and it cooks stews in short order. The potatoes are done FAST in the stew. It does chili fast but I like the taste better on the kamado of course.

6. When it comes to canning, a saying my mom used to say is actually true both as is and if reversed. She used to say that cleanliness is next to Godliness. If you don't follow proper cleaning ahead of time you might be seeing GOD sooner than you intended..Again, when it comes to pressure cooking and canning OCD is a definate plus!

 

I actully have one of these. New and never used. I go it at a thrift store for $30. I guess i should find something to can.

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1 hour ago, Marty said:

The thought of opening one of those under pressure scares the heck out of me. That could be really dangerous. That is why if using an old one i would remove the weight and depressurize immediately when done. I have never been scared of them. All of the ones that I have seen have a emergency release so that they can not explode. BUT removing the lid under pressure-----

I imagine you have your reasons/situation for opening a pressure cooker lid under pressure. I can't recall a recipe that asks for that step. I cannot get the lid off, nor desire to,  if there is even a hint of pressure. I can verify this by a mechanical pop up indicator and the lid will turn to the open position, after the pressure is released. 

 

I'm not that smart but I stick with the manufacture's directions.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, mike echo said:

I imagine you have your reasons/situation for opening a pressure cooker lid under pressure. I can't recall a recipe that asks for that step. I cannot get the lid off, nor desire to,  if there is even a hint of pressure. I can verify this by a mechanical pop up indicator and the lid will turn to the open position, after the pressure is released. 

 

I'm not that smart but I stick with the manufacture's directions.

 

 

Clearly you mis understood my intentions/thinking.  here. 

The stories of people opening a pressurized cooker are legendary. All one has to do is bring the subject up in a group of people and someone knows a person from back then who did it.

I am not saying that anyone here has or will do that.

I can think of no good reason to EVER open under pressure but apparently the old ones did not have a safety lock to prevent it.

One that could be opened would need to be used very carefully. I have used the old jiggle ones but NEVER even tested if the lid could turn under pressure.

I now put a pot holder on the handle of any thing that I take out of the oven. After too many times i just know that i will not remember and grab the handle.

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I doubt I'll use mine in meal preparation just because of the way they operate but for preserving food and making stock I think it will be an excellent cooking tool.  By saying that it takes 30-45 minutes to build up the pressure needed for pasteurizing and another 30 minutes or so once the cooking time has ended.  I can see cooking right through some foods which is not appealing.

When the ferrys stop running here due to bad weather it still amazes me how quickly the grocery store isles become empty.  

 

@Marty I considered the All American and I agree it is top notch but up here it was $400.00 plus shipping.  I just could not justify that price for the amount of use it will get.  The Presto will do all I need it to.  Now on the other hand if you're interested in shipping your $30.00 All American  to Canada.......?:roll:

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7 hours ago, K'man said:

I doubt I'll use mine in meal preparation just because of the way they operate but for preserving food and making stock I think it will be an excellent cooking tool.  By saying that it takes 30-45 minutes to build up the pressure needed for pasteurizing and another 30 minutes or so once the cooking time has ended.  I can see cooking right through some foods which is not appealing.

When the ferrys stop running here due to bad weather it still amazes me how quickly the grocery store isles become empty.  

 

@Marty I considered the All American and I agree it is top notch but up here it was $400.00 plus shipping.  I just could not justify that price for the amount of use it will get.  The Presto will do all I need it to.  Now on the other hand if you're interested in shipping your $30.00 All American  to Canada.......?:roll:

Well I guess i just lucked out on something that i am not using  now. As far as cooking with a pressure cooker. If you do not cook too long and add some of the flavors at the end--you can have an awesome meal. At least I have--that is over cooked  at times and got some thing awesome at other times. I an certain excellence each time can be achieved. I do have to admit that I do not use mine much ( cooking pressure cooker Kuhn Rikon) unless I am in a time pinch. But when I do use it the results given the time are amazing. When it is spot on other than the smoke flavoring it is as good as the Kamado IMO.

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