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Question about temp on the kamado while making pizza...


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So I'm planning on doing my first pizza cook this weekend and I was wondering what temps you guys have made pizzas at? My wife loves the crust on pizza you get from the super hot italian ovens so I was planning on temps in the range of 600 degrees. Too hot? Not hot enough? Any suggestions would be appreciated!

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I've done them at that temp even hotter. You have to keep you eye on it but it works wonderfully . If you're a topping kind of guy keep in mind at higher temps  with lots of toppings you will burn crust befor the top is cooked. If you like it simple your set! 

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I have to say, it really depends on the dough. Are you making your own dough? Following a recipe?

I strongly suggest following a set recipe until you have done enough reading to know what you are doing

If your dough as any sugars or fats stay below 500 F. If your dough is only flour water salt and yeast, go for the inferno

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If it's your first pizza I suggest starting with a dome temp of 500-550.  Make sure the kamado and pizza stone have plenty of time to preheat (15 minutes once you reach temp).

Use a deflector and pizza stone.  Keep the crust on the thinner side and go easy on the toppings.  It'll be great.

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So I'm planning on doing my first pizza cook this weekend and I was wondering what temps you guys have made pizzas at? My wife loves the crust on pizza you get from the super hot italian ovens so I was planning on temps in the range of 600 degrees. Too hot? Not hot enough? Any suggestions would be appreciated!

 

Moving to the Kamado Pizza and Baking forum since this is not a recipe...

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My go to temp is 650. However, let me give you some tips and advice. #1. and most important IMO is do not set your deflector in the lowest position during a high heat cook like pizza. The purpose of a deflector is to throw heat down and then  let it escape around the sides and not directly hit whatever you are cooking. If you set your deflector low during a high heat cook, you can easily  over heat your firebox and cause it to crack with too much heat being  thrown back down into your fire box.  I use a two  stone set up with a deflector just below the felt level (about main grate level) and my pizza stone above that as high as I can get it in the dome, to benefit from reflected heat.  You also want a good size gap around the edge of your deflector, if you use a really big deflector you will prevent enough heat from escaping between it's edge and the inside surface of your kettle. I like about an 1 1/2 to 2 "s.  Also if you are going to cook at higher temps, sugar in your dough will burn. I do not use any sugar in my dough recipe. Just flour, water, salt, yeast and oil.  Best of luck and happy cooking. IMO home made dough and pizza is just the best. 

 

post-3401-0-88989900-1468530457_thumb.jp

 

You can see the two  stones and the large air space between them

post-3401-0-92105400-1468530489_thumb.jp

 

The idea is to allow your toppings to get nice and browned & toasty while keeping your bottom crust from burning

post-3401-0-46574600-1468530522_thumb.jp

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First cook I would shoot more for about 500 degrees, on future cooks adjust cooking temp based on your results. As others have stated, when cooking higher temps you risk burning the crust before your toppings are done.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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So I'm planning on doing my first pizza cook this weekend and I was wondering what temps you guys have made pizzas at? My wife loves the crust on pizza you get from the super hot italian ovens so I was planning on temps in the range of 600 degrees. Too hot? Not hot enough? Any suggestions would be appreciated!

 

Great advice above as usual. Post us some pictures, if you already have.

 

 

If you haven't cooked it yet, then here are my notes from the past 2 yrs:

1. Fire Temp - 1000F+ is where you get the super hot Italian pizza effect (otherwise the crust becomes very hard, if cooked slow).

2. Stone Temp - 600F, cooks pizza base in 90-120 seconds. You get quick puffed up, crisp outside, soft inside.

3. Dome Temp - will vary based on kamado model, 550F to 700F i.e. depends on how far the sensor is from the stone / fire inside. Dome temp ensures that the toppings melt at the same rate as the pie cooking.

 

I started using an Infrared Thermo meter to calibrate. However, now have resorted to mostly the corn meal smoking trick.

1. Too Hot - If browns on contact or within 10 seconds, then way too hot (wipe the stone with dripping wet rag to bring the temperature down. I generally see water evaporating from stone on contact).

2. Too Cold - if it doesn't turn slight golden within 15 seconds, then not ready yet.

 

Bon Appetite !!

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