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John Setzler

My Verdict about Pizza Cooking Temps

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I have not tried to par baking the crust, which is probably why my dough never gets cooked fully when using a tomato sauce. My Italian in-laws suggested I pre-bake it as well so I am going to give it a try this weekend.  If anybody has advice on this technique, mostly how long to cook it, please post it.

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On 2/7/2017 at 0:33 PM, ATXguy said:


Man, that's a great looking pizza!   Do you have any sugar in your dough recipe?  do you find that helps with browning the crust as well, or is it mainly just the proximity to the dome that is giving you good color on the crust?

 

I do have about a Tablespoon of honey in the crust and a couple of olive oil.

I am sure that helps with the browning.

But you still have to have it close to the dome to get the good browning on everything, all the toppings, etc.

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On 9/23/2016 at 10:46 PM, rchang72 said:

Thanks for your leg work John.

I would like to know why so many people are trying to get that super high temp pizza? Just curious what changes in taste or texture for that.

 

A neopolitan style pizza is a different dough made using different flour and cooked at a very high temp.  The flavor and texture of the crust is very different than standard pizzeria pizza.  There is no way to get these results at 500-550.  You won't do it with all purpose flour, and a kamado is not the easiest tool to use to for these pies.  

 

Most Americans don't make neopolitan style pizza, and most prefer one of the many American styles.  You can't simply take all purpose flour and a NY style recipe and cook it at 850 degrees and expect it to work, or to like the result.  I think that is why so many people "fail" at the super hot pizza. 

 

If you are really interested in different styles, different dough, flour, fermenting time etc. and different cooking temps there are other forums with some incredible information, but it is a broad and deep topic with no simple answers.   

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13 hours ago, m-fine said:

 

A neopolitan style pizza is a different dough made using different flour and cooked at a very high temp.  The flavor and texture of the crust is very different than standard pizzeria pizza.  There is no way to get these results at 500-550.  You won't do it with all purpose flour, and a kamado is not the easiest tool to use to for these pies.  

 

Most Americans don't make neopolitan style pizza, and most prefer one of the many American styles.  You can't simply take all purpose flour and a NY style recipe and cook it at 850 degrees and expect it to work, or to like the result.  I think that is why so many people "fail" at the super hot pizza. 

 

If you are really interested in different styles, different dough, flour, fermenting time etc. and different cooking temps there are other forums with some incredible information, but it is a broad and deep topic with no simple answers.   

 

Good post. No such thing as an ideal pizza temp.  The ideal temp is dough specific. 

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I do go to much higher temp usually about 650-700 when I very rarely do a thin crust or Neopolitan style pizza.

Thin crust, very little toppings, no or very little sauce.

and I use the Antimo Caputo 00 flour, no honey.

 

I might do one of these maybe once a year. 

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I have not tried to par baking the crust, which is probably why my dough never gets cooked fully when using a tomato sauce. My Italian in-laws suggested I pre-bake it as well so I am going to give it a try this weekend.  If anybody has advice on this technique, mostly how long to cook it, please post it.

Get your temp settled where you want it put some baking paper on the stone and place your pizza base on for two minutes to take off add your toppings sauce and put back on .my dough is cooked at 5 to 550 for 8 min take 2 min off so check at 5 or 6 min .part baking let's you put wet ingredients on your pizza without it going soggy

Outback Kamado Bar and Grill

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On 3/12/2017 at 5:25 PM, Aussie Joe said:


Get your temp settled where you want it put some baking paper on the stone and place your pizza base on for two minutes to take off add your toppings sauce and put back on .my dough is cooked at 5 to 550 for 8 min take 2 min off so check at 5 or 6 min .part baking let's you put wet ingredients on your pizza without it going soggy

Outback Kamado Bar and Grill
 

Thanks for the response. I have since tried this method and it does come out much better. I also raised the pizza closer to the dome by putting some bricks between the grate and the pizza stone.  That seems to result in a better overall cook.

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I kinda got away from making pizza, but recently on a trip to Montana was treated to pizza that was the best I've ever tasted and came home with an I-have-to-figure-this-out determination.  It's been fun to read all of your pizza posts, and I think I'm close to what I am searching for.  I do enjoy pizza on my kamado, but want to develop something that I can have any day of the year, so the 550 temp. range in my large countertop oven is getting me there.  Also I bake it on a cast iron pan as they heat very quickly, and that really helps with the bottom browning, while I can set it a bit higher in the oven for top browning and char.  I like the toaster oven (large size) because heat elements on top and bottom, but fairly close together.  Now working on the right toppings and sauce, etc.  I'll take a picture of the next one I do.

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On 2/10/2017 at 8:21 AM, Jdub said:

I have not tried to par baking the crust, which is probably why my dough never gets cooked fully when using a tomato sauce. My Italian in-laws suggested I pre-bake it as well so I am going to give it a try this weekend.  If anybody has advice on this technique, mostly how long to cook it, please post it.

We pre bake for shrimp scampi pizza. If you do not then the dough is gooey. Even with docking we get an air bubble. Sorta like making pita bread. I let it go until the bottom is browning and the top is cooked. My one comment is it is best to let it cool down before baking it again. I find that if we do not then the bottom still being hot will burn before the topping is done. We certainly do not have pre-baking down and will watch for others suggestions.

 

We absolutely love the shrimp scampi pizza.

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This morning my breakfast was an experimental pizza in my quest.  And yes, this post is not cooking in the kamado, but it would work just as well.  I usually only make one personal sized pizza anyway, so my pizza today is very typical.  After reading some of the posts and a video on this forum, I put my cast iron pan in the oven to preheat with the oven, and prepared the crust and toppings ready to finish prep on the hot pan.  When the oven and pan were at temp (450) I removed the cast iron pan and assembled my pizza on it, which started the crust cooking as well.  Put back in oven to cook for 10 minutes, and I'm hooked on this process!  The crust was crisp and tender, and I had it piled a bit with mixed onions, olives, peppercini, mushrooms, and Italian sausage.  I'm happy, and I can stop obsessing with every day pizza...or not.  

WP_20170613_001.jpg

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Nothing but agreement from me.

 

500 degrees is an optimum tempt for me on the pies I've done over the years.

 

I typically use Publix dough because I suck on indoors stuff.

 

One day I'll learn......

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My wife and I are in the 600 - 700-degree club. Why? First, we were stationed in Italy for 3 years and fell in love with their style of pizza. It is a thin crust with simple toppings. Second, we live in Wisconsin and we smoke pizzas year round. As you can see in the one pic, we do it if it snows, or if the temp outside is below freezing! So a 3 - 5 minute cook is perfect for us. 

PizzaSnow.thumb.jpg.31afd643d61d8ec2d6c43d23c3904df7.jpg

First Smoked Pizza.jpg

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I really don't like this thread. There is no such thing as the optimum pizza temperature. It all depends on the dough formula your using. 

 

There is an optimum temperature for XYZ dough but not an optimum temperature in general. 

 

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9 hours ago, ckreef said:

I really don't like this thread. There is no such thing as the optimum pizza temperature. It all depends on the dough formula your using. 

 

There is an optimum temperature for XYZ dough but not an optimum temperature in general. 

 

Well that's just crazy talk.

 

Next you'll be advocating for women being allowed to vote, or some other subversive idea.

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