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andyscalzo

8# Boneless Prime on the JoeTisserie......

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3 hours ago, Woodman said:

That looks amazing. I went to my butcher to get a prime roast last week until I found out it was $108 for a 6 lb piece of meat--too rich for my blood. 

By "prime" do you mean Prime Grade? My butcher charged me $10.99/lb. for choice. I just saw they have it advertised on sale for $8.99 for the next two weeks. IMO, with the high fat content of a prime rib, why waste money buying Prime Grade?!? You are already getting a well marbled hunk of beef with Select Grade prime rib.

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5 hours ago, irish02bk said:

can i get a writeup of what was done to prep the meat. this is my next new cook....

Its pretty simple. Just take your favorite beef herbs and garlic and coarsely chop them. I use a small food processor, but you can use a chopping knife. Add just enough EVVO to form a paste. Salt & Pepper the roast with a nicer coating of fresh ground Kosher salt & peppercorns, then smear on the herb paste. Spin it at 325*F until it reaches an IT of about 100*F, then open both vents and sear it until the IT reaches 125 > 130*F. I supplement  the lump oll my beef cooks with chunks of Bourbon Barrels for a great smoke. I use the same procedure for both boneless and standing rib roasts. You can't get a cook much easier than that.

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17 minutes ago, andyscalzo said:

Its pretty simple. Just take your favorite beef herbs and garlic and coarsely chop them. I use a small food processor, but you can use a chopping knife. Add just enough EVVO to form a paste. Salt & Pepper the roast with a nicer coating of fresh ground Kosher salt & peppercorns, then smear on the herb paste. Spin it at 325*F until it reaches an IT of about 300*F, then open both vents and sear it until the IT reaches 125 > 103*F. I supplement  the lump oll my beef cooks with chunks of Bourbon Barrels for a great smoke. I use the same procedure for both boneless and standing rib roasts. You can't get a cook much easier than that.

and what kind of meat was that exactly?  i'm confused between the prime grade, prime roast? is it just a ribeye roast? seems like all the butchers label them different. Also about how long was it on the coals?

 

Lastly you say spin until it reach an IT of about 300??? then open both vents and sear until it reaches an IT 125>103, 

 

did you really mean an IT of 100? and then sear until it reaches an IT of 103-125 depending on how well you like your meat done?

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7 hours ago, irish02bk said:

and what kind of meat was that exactly?  i'm confused between the prime grade, prime roast? is it just a ribeye roast? seems like all the butchers label them different. Also about how long was it on the coals?

 

Lastly you say spin until it reach an IT of about 100??? then open both vents and sear until it reaches an IT 125>103, 

 

did you really mean an IT of 100? and then sear until it reaches an IT of 103-125 depending on how well you like your meat done?

Forget about the Prime Grade, you don't need Prime Grade to get a good Prime Rib Roast, as Choice Prime Ribs are always well marbled. The chunk of meat in the photo is a Boneless Prime Rib, aka Boneless Prime Rib Roast. If I took that chunk of meat and started slicing it into 1" steaks, I would have a bunch of Rib Eye Steaks. Rib Eye Steaks are cut from the Prime Rib Roast. You can also buy that same cut of meat with the bones on, which would be called a Standing Rib Roast. You can also cut that roast into steaks and you would have a bunch of Bone-in Rib Eye Steaks. Hope that helps, that's the best I got.

As for the last part, sorry about the confusion. I did mean to say 100*F then sear it to 120 > 125*F. I hate posting from my phone. That roast took about an hour and a half or so. I don't pay a lot of attention to time, I am more about the Internal Temperature. You are correct, different areas have different names for the same cuts of meat. Just ask the butcher for a Boneless Prime Rib and they will know what you want. Boneless Prime Rib Roasts are much easier to deal with vs. the Bone-in for the first couple times. I figure 1# per person. You will get shrinkage due to the high fat content, plus leftovers make for kick-@ss Prime Rib Sandwiches served on Hoagies or French Bread and dipped in aus jus. Sometimes those are even better than the main entrée!

 

 

 

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