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Joetisserie. Is it worth the money? Is the flavor noticeably different


MatthewG
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I got a Joetisserie when Kamado Joe had them on sale a couple of months back and plan to take it for its first spin with a Christmas goose.  Any and all tips from experiences any of you have had will be appreciated.  I plan to use Julia Child's "Steam Roasted Goose" recipe to steam it for 45 minutes to an hour to drain off some of the fat.

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Yes, buy the JT

 

I have the napoleon tumble basket which I've used for wings (great) and peppers for salsa/shi####os for straight eating (greater): you can also get this from atlanta grill co:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Napoleon-Rotisserie-Stainless-Basket-64000/dp/B078YCR3MH/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=napoleon+basket&qid=1608132888&sr=8-2

 

I have a flat basket for whole fish (visually stunning, and tasty), and I plan to do a mess of thighs/legs in there one day

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008P4B8M2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I also do my turkeys for the holidays this way, frees up the oven, visually impressive, DELICIOUS

 

I have done innumerable chickens/game hens, and the wife says "the chickens on the rotisserie are the best thing you make"

 

Some tips:

Get an extra set of forks, its good to have if you want to do multiple smaller birds, I can fit two "regular" store sized chickens on my classic 2, and doing two chickens with one set of forks can be problematic

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00X7OI878/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

when you put the forks in the meat, reallllllllly jam them home, like, really, the meat shrinks as it cooks, and if the forks come off the meat, tragedy!

i use a pair of plies to lock the forks down (you'll understand what i mean) instead of finger tight, again, things expand/move with heat, so the screws sometimes come loose, loose forks= potential tragedy

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5 hours ago, KJTerp said:

Yes, buy the JT

 

I have the napoleon tumble basket which I've used for wings (great) and peppers for salsa/shi####os for straight eating (greater): you can also get this from atlanta grill co:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Napoleon-Rotisserie-Stainless-Basket-64000/dp/B078YCR3MH/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=napoleon+basket&qid=1608132888&sr=8-2

 

I have a flat basket for whole fish (visually stunning, and tasty), and I plan to do a mess of thighs/legs in there one day

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008P4B8M2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I also do my turkeys for the holidays this way, frees up the oven, visually impressive, DELICIOUS

 

I have done innumerable chickens/game hens, and the wife says "the chickens on the rotisserie are the best thing you make"

 

Some tips:

Get an extra set of forks, its good to have if you want to do multiple smaller birds, I can fit two "regular" store sized chickens on my classic 2, and doing two chickens with one set of forks can be problematic

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00X7OI878/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

when you put the forks in the meat, reallllllllly jam them home, like, really, the meat shrinks as it cooks, and if the forks come off the meat, tragedy!

i use a pair of plies to lock the forks down (you'll understand what i mean) instead of finger tight, again, things expand/move with heat, so the screws sometimes come loose, loose forks= potential tragedy

+1 for everything that @KJTerp said, especially the tip on using pliers to lock the forks down.  When spinning a larger piece of meat I found the hardest part is getting it centered and balanced but it is certainly worth any fuss as the end result is typically really good.  Here is a recent post I did on my JT turkey for Thanksgiving.  Needless to say it was fantastic! https://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/46776-joetisserie-turkey/ 

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16 hours ago, KamadoBucky said:

+1 for everything that @KJTerp said, especially the tip on using pliers to lock the forks down.  When spinning a larger piece of meat I found the hardest part is getting it centered and balanced but it is certainly worth any fuss as the end result is typically really good.  Here is a recent post I did on my JT turkey for Thanksgiving.  Needless to say it was fantastic! https://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/46776-joetisserie-turkey/ 

I have seen rotisserie counter weights online to help with balance issues, which im considering looking into. chickens are pretty easy, but once you get bigger than that, its a bit of a challenge. my other tips:

 

set it up without a fire, and mark (i use a sharpie) the rod where the firebox borders are, that way you can center meat above the fire. its not the center of the rod, its offset to one side (again, you'll see what i mean when you set it all up)

 

when you're skewering, do all of that inside, get it balanced inside, all of that, do it inside. standing over a fire, with drippings hitting coals, smoke in your face, etc, is not where you want to discover you need to make an adjustment

 

now that we've sold this so hard,  I will say this. I am considering spatchcocking (or even parting out and cooking in 3 pieces) my turkey next year, now that I have a little one that needs constant attention, the set it and forget it of the spatchcock process is appealing to me a little more.

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