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24lb Turkey on the Vision Classic B


Keith B
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We did a 24lb turkey on the Vision Classic B for a Thanksgiving gathering of 25 family members and it turned out great!  It cooked in a little over 4 hours which was a lot faster than I expected for a bird this size.  It got a nice long 3 hour rest once it was done but turned out amazing.  Even after the long rest, the meat was incredibly moist and the family raved about it.  I used a butter and herb mixture under the skin and put the remaining mixture on the outside. I had the lower grate sitting on the fire box with the Vision bracket and stone and drip pan under it.  The turkey filled up the grill!  

 

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Very cool, thanks for sharing.  I'm considering doing an 18lb bird in a few weeks.  Couple of questions:

1.  What temp did you settle for cooking?  As read from a probe thermometer or the in place dome thermometer?  What were your approx. lower and upper vent settings?

2.  I have the Visions branded lava stone heat deflector and bracket (sort of thin flimsy) and I only have 2" between the stone and the lower grate that sits on the fire bowl.  Is this what you used?  What type/size drip pan (where did you get it) were you using?

3.  What type of lump and wood (how much wood too) did you use?

4.  How often did you open/burp the kamado to check the bird and or baste it?

5.  If you had gravy, then what did you use?

I'm in the planning stages and what I would like to try and do is use the two tier grate system and put the bird on the top grate and a steel rectangle pan under the bird with the gibblets (minus liver) and neck along with other ingredients/spices and water.  This will further act as an indirect heat shield but also collect most of the drippings while it stoops and creates a perfect base to be separated as a roux to make gravy.  But I only have about 7.5" from the top grate to the top of the kamado dome.  I think most birds that are 7" tall start at about 15 lbs.

Thank you,

Roy

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I use the lava stone and bracket from Vision.  Works very well.  I do my birds about 350.  Turkey is always moist.  I don't think you will have much left to do gravy.  I usually use the neck and giblets with onion and carrots to make a broth on the stove.  Just chop the goblet meat and neck meat and make your gravey.  (Strain the carrots and onion and just use the broth.). I usually also add a couple of cups of the potato water.  Thicken with a flour roux and you are good to go.  I used pecan chunks to smoke but don't go overboard. Poultry really soaks up the smoke.  Hope this helps.  You can open the grill and baste but I usually wait an hour or so before I do that.  Maybe baste every 15 or 20 minutes.

Edited by BSA
Wrong word.
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Thank you BSA,

Interesting initials, I can think of one thing they stand for as a scoutmaster for our local troop.  Anyway, I've probably read too much on this topic and everything you said seems to be spot on, wte of some doing theirs at 250 but I tend to agree the 300-350 range is probably best to cook it right.  I have cowboy lump and pecan, oak, and cherry chunk wood and apple chips.  Would you use any of the cherry?  Maybe 80% pecan and 20% cherry?  I did read multiple times that you don't want to over smoke so thinking only about 4 chunks of wood (about 3" rough dimensions).

Been doing birds regular oven style for awhile, and this will be my first smoked on the Visions B Kamado.  I know it will turn out good.  This is an incredible write up on the subject and from it I want to try his gravy method (reason for the pan/dirppings/setup I was asking above):  http://amazingribs.com/recipes/chicken_turkey_duck/ultimate_smoked_turkey.html

-Roy

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Not in the Boy Scouts but I was a good Girl Scout.  Initials just something I came up with for no particular reason.

personally I wouldn't use cherry on poultry as it is too strong for me.  Now ribs are a different story.  Someone posted a couple of years back on the best woods for meats you are cooking.  You might try the search option.

 

good luck.  You will be fine.

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Hi Roy,

I cooked at 350 degrees as measured from the probe from my Maverick.  I had two probes, one on the grate and one clipped to the food probe in the breast.  The one at the grate level was consistently lower so I set it based on the upper probe. My vent settings were 1 on the top vent and 2.5 on the bottom vent.  I also lit three places in the lump.

I used the vision stone and the vision bracket because my CGS Woo Ring put the grate up to the felt line which put the 24lb bird against the top of the Vision.  I had a small drip pan on the stone and a 16" deep dish pizza pan on top of the smaller pan to elevate if off of the stone a little.  The grate sat on top of the pizza pan just above the firebox.  

The lump I use is Rockwood and I had two chunks of peach (very mild) and one chunk of cherry.  The wood pieces were about 2" - 3"" or so.  

I did not open the grill to baste.  I had coated the bird with a butter and herb mixture under the skin and all over the outside (I used the same article from Amazing Ribs that you referred to. Here is a link to the rub I used Simon and Garfunkel Rub).  I did brine overnight and I think that was the key to such a moist turkey.  

We also made our broth on the stove (like BSA said) with the giblets and added the drippings to the gravy once the turkey was done.  I was afraid of burning the gravy due to the drip pan sitting just above the stone.

This turkey was my first on the Vision and it was also the best that we have ever had.  I highly recommend it.  Mine was done in just over 4 hours at 350ish.

Hope this helps.

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1 hour ago, KBVC said:

I used the vision stone and the vision bracket because my CGS Woo Ring put the grate up to the felt line which put the 24lb bird against the top of the Vision.  I had a small drip pan on the stone and a 16" deep dish pizza pan on top of the smaller pan to elevate if off of the stone a little.  The grate sat on top of the pizza pan just above the firebox.  

KBVC,

Thank you for the details, very helpful.  So, the small drip pan on the stone...can you give rough dimensions and did you add water to it?  So that drip pan was nothing more than a footing/footer for the deep dish pizza pan correct?  Only the lower grate was used and it fully rested on the pizza pan, meaning the perimeter of the lower grate did not touch the firebox/bowl?  About high high off the firebox, 1"?  For the drippings, were they usable or pretty charred?  Did you have to lift the turkey a little before taking it off so you could remove the pizza pan to make the gravy or did you just wait to mix the drippings after taking the bird off?

I to plan to brine and use the S&G rub recipe as well.

-Roy

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This is the drip pan I had under the pizza pan 14" SS Drip Pan.  Yes, it was just a footer for the pizza pan in order to keep it off of the stone.  The drippings did char a little but we got a good couple of cups of drippings to use in the gravy.  I added about a quart of water to the pizza pan when I started to so the early drippings wouldn't instantly burn. I did not open to add any additional water.  The lower grate sat about an inch above the fire bowl.  If you can fit the two tier grate and the turkey, then putting your pan on the first grate would help with the charring.  

I expected the cook to take much longer but it was done about 3 hours early so I just took the turkey off and tented it with one end open to let out the steam and then pulled the drip pan for the gravy.  When I stuck my thermopen into the breast to double check the temperature, juice shot out on my counter.  It was extremely moist and still quite warm when carved three hours later.

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Very cool, thanks for sharing.  I'm considering doing an 18lb bird in a few weeks.  Couple of questions:
1.  What temp did you settle for cooking?  As read from a probe thermometer or the in place dome thermometer?  What were your approx. lower and upper vent settings?
2.  I have the Visions branded lava stone heat deflector and bracket (sort of thin flimsy) and I only have 2" between the stone and the lower grate that sits on the fire bowl.  Is this what you used?  What type/size drip pan (where did you get it) were you using?
3.  What type of lump and wood (how much wood too) did you use?
4.  How often did you open/burp the kamado to check the bird and or baste it?
5.  If you had gravy, then what did you use?
I'm in the planning stages and what I would like to try and do is use the two tier grate system and put the bird on the top grate and a steel rectangle pan under the bird with the gibblets (minus liver) and neck along with other ingredients/spices and water.  This will further act as an indirect heat shield but also collect most of the drippings while it stoops and creates a perfect base to be separated as a roux to make gravy.  But I only have about 7.5" from the top grate to the top of the kamado dome.  I think most birds that are 7" tall start at about 15 lbs.
Thank you,
Roy


I did a 12 pound turkey on the upper rack in my Classic B, with a foil cake pan under it with the Neck, water, etc to catch the drippings. Came out perfect. I didn't open the lid until it was done. The temp was around 275. Hope that helps. 03aa008740b139f96b4693957e074c88.jpged983a88fc4826e588ba14d8560c3a91.jpg



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