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Shortyque

First cheese smoking attempt

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I have been consumed lately with the desire to smoke some cheese on my classic.  It just seems that everywhere I have been reading the last little while, someone has been talking about grilling cheese.  I do not have a smoker tube or maze yet (that will probably be my next grilling purchase, but need to wait and see what Santa has in the presents first), but I got to wondering if it is possible to cold smoke without one.  So here is my setup:   just a small amount of charcoal, in a string, with a few apple chunks on top.  The plan was to light the one end, and the chunks would slowly burn around my half circle.  I had the vents almost closed, just a sliver open.  Didn't start out too bad, I was holding grate temp right at 90, but after about half hour the fire was almost dead.  I was forced to open the grates a little more, and the grate temp went to 120.  That was about as low as I could hold it, so I just put a big pan of ice under the cheese.  The smoke wasn't as clean as I would have liked, probably due to very little air circulation.  After about three hours I pulled the cheese off and left it sit, then wiped it gently and bagged it.  I just sliced a piece after a week and half of fridge time.  The swiss is really good, the cheddar is o.k., but I probably should have gotten sharp instead of mild.  Would I do this again?  Probably not, I think the smoke tube is worth waiting on, but this did turn out better than I expected.  PICT0658.JPG

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I like the temp to not get over 80F, preferably 70F

Those look like pretty large chunks of cheese.  I like to take a 2 lb. loaf, cut in half, then cut those into halves again, and sometimes in half again for approx. 1"x1" long pieces that are perfect for crackers. At any rate, the more surface you have for the smoke to get to = better smoked cheese.

I do cheese in the old Chargriller Wrangler, but can do in a Kamado -- typically you have to leave the vents at 1/2 open in a Kamado to keep the smoke tubes burning/smoking. 

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On 12/4/2016 at 9:01 PM, bcrgrill said:

I like the temp to not get over 80F, preferably 70F

Those look like pretty large chunks of cheese.  I like to take a 2 lb. loaf, cut in half, then cut those into halves again, and sometimes in half again for approx. 1"x1" long pieces that are perfect for crackers. At any rate, the more surface you have for the smoke to get to = better smoked cheese.

I do cheese in the old Chargriller Wrangler, but can do in a Kamado -- typically you have to leave the vents at 1/2 open in a Kamado to keep the smoke tubes burning/smoking. 

Thanks for that input.   I wasn't sure how to set the vents for a smoker tube.  I also like the idea of cutting the chunks smaller.  We are really enjoying this, especially the swiss.  We made hot ham and cheese sandwiches for some guests on Sunday nite, and used the smoked swiss.  They seemed to be a hit.  I think smoked cheese is going to be a regular at our house.  I cannot believe how this kamado has changed our eating in the last year.  Love it!!!

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2 minutes ago, Shortyque said:

Thanks for that input.   I wasn't sure how to set the vents for a smoker tube.  I also like the idea of cutting the chunks smaller.  We are really enjoying this, especially the swiss.  We made hot ham and cheese sandwiches for some guests on Sunday nite, and used the smoked swiss.  They seemed to be a hit.  I think smoked cheese is going to be a regular at our house.  I cannot believe how this kamado has changed our eating in the last year.  Love it!!!

Depending on the Kamado -- maybe vents have to be full open.  The Akorn works with vents @ 1/2.

We make up "gift packs" of 4 different cheese to = 1 lb. vacuum packed pkgs.  People love them. 

Make up a smoked cheese & cracker plate for pot-lucks, family gatherings, etc.  Always a big hit.

The softer the cheese, the more smoke it absorbs, consequently some of the best cheese to smoke are the softer varieties. 

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6 minutes ago, bcrgrill said:

Depending on the Kamado -- maybe vents have to be full open.  The Akorn works with vents @ 1/2.

We make up "gift packs" of 4 different cheese to = 1 lb. vacuum packed pkgs.  People love them. 

Make up a smoked cheese & cracker plate for pot-lucks, family gatherings, etc.  Always a big hit.

The softer the cheese, the more smoke it absorbs, consequently some of the best cheese to smoke are the softer varieties. 

O.k, I'll have to experiment with that.  We have an awsome BGE dealer real close, and I plan to get my smoker tube from him.  He can probably give some advice.  (I just wish so bad he sold KJ!!!)   

Also love the gift idea.  My wife and I talked about doing that.  I think that would be a real big hit for family.  I want to become a little more experienced with the whole process first, though.

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