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Dough weight for 10 and 12 inch pizzas


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I think that is going to be a hard question to answer. 4 oz of dough A might not stretch out the same as 4 oz of dough B. Way to many variables to account for. 

This is probably a trial and error situation for your exact dough recipe. Take the dough recipe you use and divide into 2 balls and see what you get. You should be able to use that as a baseline. 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Using the recipe I like for NY style pizza, my weight in grams for the dough as stretched out for a NY style pizza per square inch comes to about 2.25g/sq. in., so assuming your idea of a NY style Pizza dough thickness is about the same as mine, this is the chart I came up with so that I can approximate the weight of dough I need to make the size pizza I want:
 

AREA                  DIAMETER    DOUGH WEIGHT   DENSITY

78  sq in area     10" pizza        176g dough            @ 2.25g/sq. in.
95  sq in area     11" pizza        213g dough            @ 2.25g/sq. in.
113 sq in area    12" pizza       254g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
132 sq in area    13" pizza       298g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
153 sq in area    14" pizza       344g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
176 sq in area    15" pizza       396g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
201 sq in area    16" pizza       452g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
222 sq in area    17" pizza       500g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
254 sq in area    18" pizza       571g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
283 sq in area    19" pizza       637g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
314 sq in area    20" pizza       706g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.

 

My NY style dough:

153 grams 00 flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon)
153 grams all-purpose flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon and 2 teaspoons)
8 grams fine sea salt (1 teaspoon)
2 grams active dry yeast (3/4 teaspoon)
4 grams extra-virgin olive oil (1 teaspoon)

 

Baker's percents:
65.3 % Hydration
.65 % Yeast
2.6 % Salt
1.3 % Oil
 
This is a picture of the last pizza I made with this recipe at about 14" size before cooking on the Big Joe2jRPuHp.jpg
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3 hours ago, ATXguy said:

Using the recipe I like for NY style pizza, my weight in grams for the dough as stretched out for a NY style pizza per square inch comes to about 2.25g/sq. in., so assuming your idea of a NY style Pizza dough thickness is about the same as mine, this is the chart I came up with so that I can approximate the weight of dough I need to make the size pizza I want:
 

AREA                  DIAMETER    DOUGH WEIGHT   DENSITY

78  sq in area     10" pizza        176g dough            @ 2.25g/sq. in.
95  sq in area     11" pizza        213g dough            @ 2.25g/sq. in.
113 sq in area    12" pizza       254g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
132 sq in area    13" pizza       298g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
153 sq in area    14" pizza       344g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
176 sq in area    15" pizza       396g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
201 sq in area    16" pizza       452g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
222 sq in area    17" pizza       500g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
254 sq in area    18" pizza       571g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
283 sq in area    19" pizza       637g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
314 sq in area    20" pizza       706g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.

 

My NY style dough:

153 grams 00 flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon)
153 grams all-purpose flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon and 2 teaspoons)
8 grams fine sea salt (1 teaspoon)
2 grams active dry yeast (3/4 teaspoon)
4 grams extra-virgin olive oil (1 teaspoon)

 

Baker's percents:
65.3 % Hydration
.65 % Yeast
2.6 % Salt
1.3 % Oil
 
This is a picture of the last pizza I made with this recipe at about 14" size before cooking on the Big Joe2jRPuHp.jpg

Thank you very much for all the info!

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 1/25/2017 at 11:47 AM, ATXguy said:

Using the recipe I like for NY style pizza, my weight in grams for the dough as stretched out for a NY style pizza per square inch comes to about 2.25g/sq. in., so assuming your idea of a NY style Pizza dough thickness is about the same as mine, this is the chart I came up with so that I can approximate the weight of dough I need to make the size pizza I want:
 

AREA                  DIAMETER    DOUGH WEIGHT   DENSITY

78  sq in area     10" pizza        176g dough            @ 2.25g/sq. in.
95  sq in area     11" pizza        213g dough            @ 2.25g/sq. in.
113 sq in area    12" pizza       254g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
132 sq in area    13" pizza       298g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
153 sq in area    14" pizza       344g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
176 sq in area    15" pizza       396g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
201 sq in area    16" pizza       452g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
222 sq in area    17" pizza       500g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
254 sq in area    18" pizza       571g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
283 sq in area    19" pizza       637g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.
314 sq in area    20" pizza       706g dough             @ 2.25g/sq. in.

 

My NY style dough:

153 grams 00 flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon)
153 grams all-purpose flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon and 2 teaspoons)
8 grams fine sea salt (1 teaspoon)
2 grams active dry yeast (3/4 teaspoon)
4 grams extra-virgin olive oil (1 teaspoon)

 

Baker's percents:
65.3 % Hydration
.65 % Yeast
2.6 % Salt
1.3 % Oil
 
 

 

Hrm. I use this recipe: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/07/basic-new-york-style-pizza-dough.html 

 

When split in 3 it gives approximately a 380 gram dough ball (3x).  I find I can't stretch it past 12 to maybe MAYBE 13" if I'm extremely patient and careful or it'll tear.  By your account I should be able to get a 15" pie out of that, but I just can't do it.

 

*Edit: Even Kenji himself says that should go 12-14"... so I guess I'm not too far off target:  http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2010/10/the-pizza-lab-how-to-make-great-new-york-style-pizza.html

 

 

Hello from North of Austin. :)

 

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12 hours ago, Mindflux said:

 I find I can't stretch it past 12 to maybe MAYBE 13" if I'm extremely patient and careful or it'll tear

 

I struggled and fought with my dough for a long time until I got serious and tried to learn everything I could. I could never figure out how people made it look so easy. Its all in what you know about dough. 

 

You haven't built up enough gluten structure if this is your problem. Also a good dough will be very easy to stretch. It will almost stretch itself. I had the same problems when starting out. The biggest thing to learn is what the dough should look like and feel like. What temp to start stretching and how long to let it rest before stretching etc. 

 

Once I learned that, stretching dough is a piece of cake. It literally stretches itself. I shoot for 350g for dough weight on a 14 pie. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, landscaper said:

 

I struggled and fought with my dough for a long time until I got serious and tried to learn everything I could. I could never figure out how people made it look so easy. Its all in what you know about dough. 

 

You haven't built up enough gluten structure if this is your problem. Also a good dough will be very easy to stretch. It will almost stretch itself. I had the same problems when starting out. The biggest thing to learn is what the dough should look like and feel like. What temp to start stretching and how long to let it rest before stretching etc. 

 

Once I learned that, stretching dough is a piece of cake. It literally stretches itself. I shoot for 350g for dough weight on a 14 pie. 

 

 

 

The dough gets plenty of kneading, if not by mixer then by food processor.  It always passes the window pane test....  I think I'm just pounding it too thin in spots as I stretch.

 

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You shouldn't have to pound it. If everything is made right and at proper temp, than just the act of pressing on it very gently will make it take its shape. When you pick it up it, it will want to stretch out almost under its own weight. It will have almost no pull back when working it. If you have to work it to hard than its not ready or too cold. 

 

I used to fight like heck trying to get it shaped, now its easy peasy. 

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12 minutes ago, landscaper said:

You shouldn't have to pound it. If everything is made right and at proper temp, than just the act of pressing on it very gently will make it take its shape. When you pick it up it, it will want to stretch out almost under its own weight. It will have almost no pull back when working it. If you have to work it to hard than its not ready or too cold. 

 

I used to fight like heck trying to get it shaped, now its easy peasy. 

 

The act of pressing it out is called 'pounding/punching down the dough' .. it's not a literal pounding.  It stretches easy (and doesn't retract) but if I try to push it too far I usually get tears near the crust rim where I (probably) spend the most time pressing down to get that nice rim.

 

 

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