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Planning a Christmas Rib Roast


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The family chose a rib roast as the Christmas meal - now I have to pull that off. We've done a few, but always in the oven. Haven't had a chance to make one since I got a kamado

I'll check Costco tomorrow, but I'm planning on getting one with the bones, then cutting them off to make stock/gravy. I'll probably do that a day ahead so I can roast the bones on the grill a bit before using them for stock. I'd also like to trim and render some of the fat to use for Yorkshire puddings.

I think I'll follow Meathead's recipe. The only thing I was thinking about changing was putting it on the rotisserie instead of the indirect cooking. 

Any hints, tips, thoughts?

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24 minutes ago, Mr Cue said:

I'd do a reverse sear as @Baby Back Maniac did in one of his recent Weber Summit videos. Also, I'd cut the bones off and tie them back on for the cook. Let them cook with the roast then take them off to make the gravy as the roast rests prior to carving. 

My technique as well. Cut off the bones with a nice close cut and then tie them back onto the roast. Slather the roast with mustard and sprinkle on the rub of your choice. I like kosher salt cracked pepper, minced garlic, juniper berry, rosemary, and thyme.  I cook mine indirect at between 325 and 350 to an IT of 120 and pull it. The trick is to cook it at moderate heat to create a rosy pink medium rare from the center all the way to the edge. The higher the temp you use the thicker medium brown ring around the outer edge of the roast.  Snip the strings and remove the bones, wrap the roast in foil and put it in a cooler for 30 minutes to rest. Best of both worlds cook as a bone in, slice when boneless. The only problem in doing one for Christmas dinner is the family will love it and request / demand one every year. ( I have cooked one almost every Christmas for the last 34 ). Have fun, it is an easy cook and smells amazing.  Merry Christmas.

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I have to cook two different Christmas dinners, one for my side of the family, one for the wifey's.  Ham for the first, and thinking of Prime Rib for the 2nd.  Local meat market has a special on Prime Rib, 5.77/#.  I would have to pick up the roast on Saturday, and refrigerate for 4 days.

I just cooked a PR a few weeks ago, and used the following rub, and loved it: (from allrecipes.com: Garlic prime rib)

10 cloves garlic, minced

2 TBSP EVOO

2 TSP salt

2 TSP ground black pepp

2 TSP dried thyme

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I have to cook two different Christmas dinners, one for my side of the family, one for the wifey's.  Ham for the first, and thinking of Prime Rib for the 2nd.  Local meat market has a special on Prime Rib, 5.77/#.  I would have to pick up the roast on Saturday, and refrigerate for 4 days.
I just cooked a PR a few weeks ago, and used the following rub, and loved it: (from allrecipes.com: Garlic prime rib)
10 cloves garlic, minced
2 TBSP EVOO
2 TSP salt
2 TSP ground black pepp
2 TSP dried thyme


$5.77 for prime? Who's got that deal? I've seen choice for that price on sale, but never prime.

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Interesting - almost every recipe I've seen, aside from Meathead, says to either leave the bones on or cut them off and tie back on. Meathead's theory is that the bones don't add anything to the cook and, if anything, they cause uneven cooking. He removed the bones and that gives more surface area for rub and bark.

I'll definitely try to take the bones off, now I just have to decide if I will leave them off or tie them back on. Anyone tried both and preferred them tied back on? 

 

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1 hour ago, cschaaf said:

Interesting - almost every recipe I've seen, aside from Meathead, says to either leave the bones on or cut them off and tie back on. Meathead's theory is that the bones don't add anything to the cook and, if anything, they cause uneven cooking. He removed the bones and that gives more surface area for rub and bark.

I'll definitely try to take the bones off, now I just have to decide if I will leave them off or tie them back on. Anyone tried both and preferred them tied back on? 

 

 

I like meatheads theory. Once I get my chunk cut off the primal I'll probably cut the bones off and leave them off. Then I'll do a running stitch to get it into a nice uniform shape. That should be the most even cook with the most herb/rub exposure. 

 

That's my plan for now anyway. 

 

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For me having leftover Prime Rib is as important as leftover Turkey at Christmas.  Nothing better than taking a nice slab of Prime Rib, hitting it with some Cajun seasons and tossing it on a hot cast iron skillet to make blackened Prime Rib!  Even though it only takes a couple of minutes to cook, it is worth doing on your Kamado Joe 1/2 moon cast iron if you have one as the smoke created during the blackening can really take your breath away.

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I have done the perfect brown exterior and medium rare inside. I have also had it  many times at a local restaurant that specialized in it and sold it at $9 with a open salad bar and two sides.

Before it is carved the presentation is awesome.

 

Any more I buy those rib roasts on sale and cut them into steaks which I brown on both sides and serve medium rare. Sometimes I  cut them up and freeze them for later. I just do not really enjoy a chunk of prime rib unless it has a chunk of caramelized exterior attached.

 

For me there is just not all that much flavor to plain rare or medium rare red meat with out the brown caramelized surface. I want max brown surface.

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I got a few steps done today.

 

Bought a 4-rib choice rib roast at Costco. It was just over 9.5 lbs. I trimmed off the bones (much easier than I anticipated), trimmed the hard fat, silver skin, and some of the softer fat. Then I tied it up to make it round-ish, salted it, and have it in the second fridge to air dry. Kenji's recipe recommended at least 4 days of salted air drying. 

 

Tomorrow, I'll throw the bones on the grill and render off some drippings from the fat trimmings. The bones will then take a long, hot bath with some veggies to make the stock, and the fat renderings will saved for the Yorkshire Puddings.

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