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Good Knives


cday23
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I am looking to either buy a set of knives if I find a good deal or build a set one by one if they are too expensive. There are too many brands out there to just look at reviews. I would like to know what the cooks on this site are using. There are two that I have found that look alright. I will list them below. Tale me if you have experience with these or about your experience with others.

http://www.madcowcutlery.com/store/pc/C ... 4p1573.htm

http://www.texasbbqrub.com/bbqknives.htm

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Don't bother with a set. A good paring knife and either a chef's knife or a santoku will handle 90% of your kitchen cutting duties, so why not spend 90% of your cutley budget on them?

A Victorinox chef's knife and paring knife will satisfy all but the most discerning, and only cost about $35 total. The Messermeisters and Mundials (both also available on Amazon, btw) that you linked are decent, but I'd still take Victorinox.

After you've got the basics, then you can decide if you need more. Personally, I have the two linked above plus a bread knife and cleaver, all Victorinox. My needs are met, and I'm not stuck with any 'filler' knives that manufacturers add to make the set bigger, but don't serve any need not met by what I've got.

If I ever decided to upgrade, I'd be looking mainly at Japanese knives. Tojiro DP, Sugimoto CM, Fugiwara FKM, and Richmond Artifex are all a pretty good value in that range. I'd take any of them over a Wusthof or Henckels Zwilling, higher-qulity steels and finer edges.

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I was in your same situation. I wasn't gonna buy a set. I decided to buy just the knives I wanted, and like Toe said, there are only 3 or 4 knives you need. So far, I have bought the 8" chef's knife and the 4" paring knife. I know I will be buying the bread knife and a boning knife to go with them. I may or may not buy a santoku as I don't believe they are essential. I'll also be buying the matched steel to go with these knives.

WHICH brand of knives you decide to buy should be a personal choice. You need to handle the knives before you choose the one that is right for you. I like a knife with some weight to it, so that sorta took me out of the 'Shun' loop as much as I liked the looks of those knives. They are great knives but they didn't feel that great in my hand.

I am buying knives out of THIS SET and I'm very happy with them. I can buy individual pieces through my local Bed Bath & Beyond and use the occasional 20% off coupons they send out...

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Cday23 - Toe is spot on ... Especially with the Victorinox knives. I bought a set years ago, got a GREAT deal and couldn't pass it up. I would also urge you to getting a boning knife (always useful in prepping ribs, bellies for bacon, etc.) and a cleaver. I also have a carving knife and fork that I use for briskets, hams, clods, etc. A good set of knives that fits YOUR needs is invaluable and so nice to work with! Enjoy! :D

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Chef's knives and santokus are both 'all-purpose' knives. They'll handle the vast majority of your cutting needs, meat and vegetable. I have a slight preference for chef's knives for using a rocking motion - santokus can rock, but not quite as much. On the other had, some like santokus more for straight up-and-down chopping - you've typically got more edge in contact with the surface of the cutting board. In a way, they're kinda like a little cleaver. (Chinese cleavers are another option, btw, they're almost a cross between a western cleaver and a santoku.) Chef's knives tend to be larger than santokus, though there's some overlap. Some like a big, heavy chef's knife. I know some women are intimidated by a huge stabby chef's knife, and prefer a santoku for that reason.

So bottom line, it just depends on how you like to cut. Ideally, you could find a friend that owns some you could try out, or a store with a friendly return policy.

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I second that. I have the one with both standard and asain angles. I love love love these sharpeners. Your knife is back to new in seconds or at most a minute and a half.

If you have had one of those for twenty years--how well does the diamond wheel and hone hold up in the Chef's Choice?

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What is the difference in the chefs knife and santoku? They look very similiar.

The santuko has a blade that sits flat on the cutting board--or at least the one I have seen. A chefs knife will curve away from the cutting board if you put it on the board.

If you watch the food network or any cooking show you will most likly see them using a chefs knife. The curve helps with the chopping and slicing combination motion. Some times when they are slicing something like carrots --I will see them use a santuko.

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Eli - America's test kitchen chose that specific sharpener as the best product of it's type on the market! There is a YouTube video on how and why they chose it. Unfortunately I can't find it right now. :(

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