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Likes Big Butts

Umai or not to Umai

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Completely new to the game here and have not made any purchases as yet, aside from my handy dandy vacuum sealer.  In reading this article, the author states basically that nothing is gained out of buying Umai bags other than spending $30.  I tend to agree with this, especially since I have a dedicated refrigerator available.  The only other advantage I can gather is that it keeps things tidy, again not worth $30 if I have a dedicated fridge. 

 

Next, can you just buy any old slab o meat to dry age?  And by that I mean like a whole strip loin, choice or better?

 

What is the preferred temperature of refrigeration?

 

Any pointers, things to look for, or special accessories recommended?

 

Thanks guys, I know I could search and read 6 different threads to get all this but hey, I'm as lazy as the rest of you.  :)

Edited by Likes Big Butts

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My first attempt at dry aging and I'm using the Umai bags. I think for the novice the bags are the way to go. After spending $130 for My Ribeye I didn't want to mess it up.
The bags allow the moisture to pass, protects the meat and no smell.
Instructions say do not use a dedicated fridge, use one that gets opened a lot to let moisture out. I think the recommended temp is 34 to 36 deg F.
d96e92da6536c6eee3f1185815d27239.jpg
From RD, 17.9 pounds.
14.2 pounds in the Umai bag to start.
I had to cut 3 pounds off the big end to get it to fit in the bag.
04a2a1a43deba769952bcd304d0df972.jpg
At one week after flipping the fat side is now down.
08152a36062ed048ccb4b2a7cf80c7c0.jpg
ca239841b1d9b9b32694be86518b8d32.jpg
Today three weeks in, letting it go one more week.
Weight is 12.1 pounds, no mold, no smells, no weird colors, feels very firm.
For first timer doing this I would recommend using a bag.
DryAgePro also sells these bags.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Quicky scanned the article. It seems the whiz can not operate his sealer and then declares the bags don't work. I have aged 6 rib eye primals with zero issues and they look exactly the way my local butchers commercial dry aging system puts out. Just saying...

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3 hours ago, BhamBruni said:

Quicky scanned the article. It seems the whiz can not operate his sealer and then declares the bags don't work. I have aged 6 rib eye primals with zero issues and they look exactly the way my local butchers commercial dry aging system puts out. Just saying...

 

I was more interested in the fact they were able to do it with minimal effort without bags and repeatedly.

 

3 hours ago, coldfusion said:

Instructions say do not use a dedicated fridge, use one that gets opened a lot to let moisture out. I think the recommended temp is 34 to 36 deg F.

 

Makes sense, it's going to be a mostly dedicated fridge no matter what just because of space so I'll have to make sure this happens.

 

Another question, can you unfreeze a cut and use it?  I would assume you can as long as it was frozen fresh enough.

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So here's what I got so far, 2 weeks as of yesterday.  Very firm, dry crust formed with no smells really of any kind.  I assume that's a good thing.  Used a fan in the fridge, should I stop that?  Any other suggestions?
Bones.thumb.jpg.26991a5f071ec9a7027e48d3139d7878.jpg
Crust.thumb.jpg.d5b9e97f216a27443adf3e798bd760cf.jpg


I have seen some folks fill the tray with salt to draw in moisture and keep the humidity down. What do y'all with some experience think about that?

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I think that's why the instructions or the website say to use a refrigerator that is opened several times a day rather than one in the garage or a dedicated one when using these bags.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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I love Umai. I really admire the way they approach their business, simple and great customer service. I started with their charcuterie package then dry age steak. all worked like a champ.

Here is a ribeye I did w/ umai, 30 days. It was very easy. I had to vac it twice because of running liquid prevented a good seal the first time. I had to tap it dry and did it again.

DSCF1555.jpg

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On 3/31/2017 at 9:31 AM, coldfusion said:

My first attempt at dry aging and I'm using the Umai bags. I think for the novice the bags are the way to go. After spending $130 for My Ribeye I didn't want to mess it up.
The bags allow the moisture to pass, protects the meat and no smell.
Instructions say do not use a dedicated fridge, use one that gets opened a lot to let moisture out. I think the recommended temp is 34 to 36 deg F.
d96e92da6536c6eee3f1185815d27239.jpg
From RD, 17.9 pounds.
14.2 pounds in the Umai bag to start.
I had to cut 3 pounds off the big end to get it to fit in the bag.
04a2a1a43deba769952bcd304d0df972.jpg
At one week after flipping the fat side is now down.
08152a36062ed048ccb4b2a7cf80c7c0.jpg
ca239841b1d9b9b32694be86518b8d32.jpg
Today three weeks in, letting it go one more week.
Weight is 12.1 pounds, no mold, no smells, no weird colors, feels very firm.
For first timer doing this I would recommend using a bag.
DryAgePro also sells these bags.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Looks Awesome!!!

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I never got back on my results here, just had life stuff happen.  I did end up having them aged at 42 days without Umai bags and the results were... interesting?  First, the short loin is a bad cut to dry age, too much waste.  I ended up with basically a bunch of very small strip steaks.  Second, the taste is... different.  Not bad, but not really what I was hoping for.  I still have a few in the freezer and they may stay there a while.  My daughter, who is a steak fan, didn't care for them and I was less than impressed on the taste.

 

I think in the future I will indeed use Umai and probably a bone in rib roast.  The taste may or may not have been because of the refrigerator I used and I think the bags will help with that.  And a bone in rib roast looks to be the most common cut to dry age due to outer fat and the bones to reduce waste.

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I’m starting my first Umai tomorrow in a new fridge that’s going in my garage. I’m wondering how much of your results are due to not using a bag versus going for 42 days instead of say 28 to 35.  Since I’m leaving for three weeks next week I’m hoping that set it up and forget will work okay. I will have 4 days before I leave so I can open the door and let the major moisture out. 

 

I hope your next try goes better.   

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15 hours ago, AZMDTed said:

I’m starting my first Umai tomorrow in a new fridge that’s going in my garage. I’m wondering how much of your results are due to not using a bag versus going for 42 days instead of say 28 to 35.  Since I’m leaving for three weeks next week I’m hoping that set it up and forget will work okay. I will have 4 days before I leave so I can open the door and let the major moisture out. 

 

I hope your next try goes better.   

I don't know the answer to that since this was my first foray into dry aging. My science background tells me to only change one thing but I think I will do a lot of things differently next time. I aged it 42 days because I read that had the best taste to the most people. I will probably only do 30 days next time. 

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