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Blaze Kamado Salt Water Test Round 1

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That Blaze sank .... just like the Titanic.  I don't think anyone would say the Titanic was a success!  

 

Would someone like to explain to me the point of this "test"?  I've lived and kamado cooked in Florida, Houston, and New Orleans and never had a problem with the ocean environs.  I'm at a loss here ....

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27 minutes ago, CeramicChef said:

That Blaze sank .... just like the Titanic.  I don't think anyone would say the Titanic was a success!  

 

Would someone like to explain to me the point of this "test"?  I've lived and kamado cooked in Florida, Houston, and New Orleans and never had a problem with the ocean environs.  I'm at a loss here ....

Being that it's all metal people asked if a salt water environment would affect the metal, so I guess he was going to the extreme to see if a week in salt water would start to corrode it.

 

Garvin

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36 minutes ago, Paul Beer said:

At work we have tables that tell us how much material will corrode each year in certain conditions - seems an easier way of finding out!

This isn't the owner of blaze kamado so someone decided on their own to do this test and at 1799.00 it's an expensive test:-o

 

Garvin

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This isn't the owner of blaze kamado so someone decided on their own to do this test and at 1799.00 it's an expensive test:-o
 
Garvin


I was thinking that too. Perhaps he is a dealer or someone else involved in the company somehow. This is a common question that gets asked so it is a worthwhile test, if you have a particular vested interest in the results. I of course have interest, but not enough of one to throw mine in the ocean :)

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If there is no saltwater corrosion or dissimilar corrosion between the stainless and aluminum--- then It seems that should be the last real question remaining. It is so far looking like an awesome Kamado. One that one can really be loaded up and hauled around. Expensive relatively speaking but with real advantages to offset the cost.

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32 minutes ago, Marty said:

If there is no saltwater corrosion or dissimilar corrosion between the stainless and aluminum--- then It seems that should be the last real question remaining. It is so far looking like an awesome Kamado. One that one can really loaded up and hauled around. Expensive relatively speaking but with real advantages to offset the cost.

I would agree with you and with it having 304 stainless and heavy duty aluminum the corrosion should be minimal! Outside of his extreme test having a cover and closing the vents it should last a lifetime and it does have lifetime warranty on all parts!

 

Garvin

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There ain't going to be corrosion.  This guy knows this if he lives near saltwater.  #04 and aluminum aren't going to create any kind of galvanic couple.  This test is bull butter.  I"m throwing the flag.  Besides, being in salt water is a MUCH different environment than sitting on a deck.  Salt water has much less O2 than air.  

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CC he is probably a dealer because BBQguys isn't anywhere near this video and I bet his customer's were asking about corrosion and he tried to play genius and did this video. Nstigator can speak to what's in the description about corrosion and they wouldn't give a lifetime warranty on all parts if they felt corrosion was going to be a problem.

 

Garvin

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The manual says this about salt and other chemicals

"Protection from Weather: Keep the grill protected from adverse weather, including rain and high winds.
Place the grill in an outdoor area that is protected from the wind. The exposure of the grill body to salt in
the air (either along the coast or by salt water pools), pool chemicals, garden fertilizers, countertop
chemicals (stone sealer) can accelerate the corrosion of the grill components. More regular cleaning of
the grill and covering of the unit will be required in these settings. Never store any chemicals near your
grill. Moisture allowed to enter the grill can create mold and could eventually spill out of the front air inlet
taking spent ash residue with it."

Then it says this in the warranty section...

"Improper Maintenance, high cooking temperatures, excessive humidity, chlorine, fertilizers, lawn pesticides,
chemicals, and salt can affect the Stainless Steel components and for these reasons, the warranties DO NOT COVER
DISCOLORATION, SURFACE RUST, OR RUST, unless there is a loss of structural integrity / rust through of the
appliance components. This warranty covers defects in material and workmanship."

So I think the bottom line is that the warranty will cover any structural damage to the grill as long as it's not obvious that you have just left the grill out in the elements with no care to try to protect or clean it. And even then, it seems to indicate that this is really only a concern on the stainless steel parts.

Still, the point of these tests is to remove the, "why would I get this grill over ceramic when [insert random or extreme case here]" question. People automatically are skeptical when a new player enters the market with a different concept than they tried and true ceramic. We see it here on this forum so obviously dealers are going to see this too. So dumping it in the ocean to prove it can withstand salt corrosion is much like exposing it to crazy high temperatures. Extreme? Yes. Necessary? Probably not. People could search the Internet to see how the materials that the grill is made of will hold up to certain weather or heat conditions. But a picture or video is worth so much more.

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There ain't going to be corrosion.  This guy knows this if he lives near saltwater.  #04 and aluminum aren't going to create any kind of galvanic couple.  This test is bull butter.  I"m throwing the flag.  Besides, being in salt water is a MUCH different environment than sitting on a deck.  Salt water has much less O2 than air.  


+1 - without oxygen, corrosion is extremely limited. That's why metal ships that have been sunk in wars past are still found nearly intact. This "test" is total BS.

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16 hours ago, CeramicChef said:

There ain't going to be corrosion.  This guy knows this if he lives near saltwater.  #04 and aluminum aren't going to create any kind of galvanic couple.  This test is bull butter.  I"m throwing the flag.  Besides, being in salt water is a MUCH different environment than sitting on a deck.  Salt water has much less O2 than air.  

 

9 hours ago, rogerfromco said:

 


+1 - without oxygen, corrosion is extremely limited. That's why metal ships that have been sunk in wars past are still found nearly intact. This "test" is total BS.

 

 

Oxygen at or near the surface of the ocean is at or near the same levels of the oxygen we breath in our air.  Oxygen levels do become scarce in the deep ocean, but that does not apply here.  The guy dropped it in the water just a few feet.  There is plenty of oxygen at the level that this test is being run.

 

However, there may be better ways to test the long term susceptibility of this grill to salt corrosion.  I did a little research and it seems a salt spray test is a more common corrosion test.  Which make sense and would seem a bit more real world.  But immersion tests are also used, which does speak to the validity of this test to some extent.

 

The guy who made the video is representing a dealer in Orange Beach, AL (near the gulf coast).  I bet he gets questions about salt corrosion all the time.  People probably want to put this grill out in their beach homes and are wondering how well it will hold up on their decks.  This test, while extreme, should help ease their minds.

 

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The percentage of Oxygen in the atmosphere at sea level is about 21%.  

 

Here is a chart and tabular data that demonstrates that O2 sats in water are SIGNIFICANTLY less than O2 in air at sea level.  If O2 sats in seawater "...at or near the surface of the ocean is at or near the same levels of the oxygen we breath in our air ..." as you claim, then we could inhale sea water and not drown.  Such is decidedly NOT the case.  People drown all the time in the ocean, especially in the top 3 feet or so.  

 

The test you should run is just put an Aluminum ingot of the type being used in a salt water mist for days on end and leave it at that.  Don't try and be too cure by half.  Or, go dredge up an aluminum beer can off the bottom of that inlet and show that to people.  

 

I'm not trying to pick any sort of fight and I'm really not trying to denigrate anyone or anything, but please, don't insult my intelligence with this kind of bull butter.  This kamado isn't going to weather/oxidize in a salt water atmosphere for a very long time.  

 

Seems to me that Blaze is a solid kamado.  It doesn't need to pull the wool over folks eyes.

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