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Ken Forkish 48-72 Hour Biga Pizza Dough


John Setzler
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 I don't use a preferment. I did the sour dough starter thing but broke the container I bought from KA. Slipped out of my hand and smashed. Oh well.  I was a pain in the butt anyway.  I make my dough 3 days before I use it and let it sit in the fridge. You can tell a difference in flavor. I don't go beyond 3 days as the dough will blow up on you from over fermenting. 

 

The right flour is key in my opinion. I tried the 00 flour and it doesn't get the crust I'm looking for. I prefer the NY style chew I grew up on. 

 

All Trumps is the best for that. In my humble opinion. 

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John, Thanks for this great write up! I too am reading the Elements of Pizza however I dived right into the recipes and have yet to try this one. Your posting now has me psyched up for working with this one for the upcoming weekend. I will provide pics if the results are worthy.... 

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28 minutes ago, Stinga said:

 Your posting now has me psyched up for working with this one for the upcoming weekend. I will provide pics if the results are worthy.... 

 

We want to see pictures and a write up weather worthy or not. You'll learn more from your failures than you will from your successes. And we want to learn right along with you. 

 

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36 minutes ago, ckreef said:

 

We want to see pictures and a write up weather worthy or not. You'll learn more from your failures than you will from your successes. And we want to learn right along with you. 

 

 

1 hour ago, Stinga said:

John, Thanks for this great write up! I too am reading the Elements of Pizza however I dived right into the recipes and have yet to try this one. Your posting now has me psyched up for working with this one for the upcoming weekend. I will provide pics if the results are worthy.... 

I agree with Ck

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I will try this recipe this weekend starting Saturday and cooking on Sunday.

Sourdough Pizza Crust:

 

400 Grams KA all purpose flour

50 Grams Sourdough Starter- Whole Wheat

7 Grams of Salt

280 Grams of Warm Water

Hoping for a 70% Hydration with this formula, mix everything together until well incorporated cover and let sit for 18hrs. Make dough balls after the 18hr fermentation cycle and either let rise a second time and use or place in fidge for additional 48hrs. Any suggestion's is welcome.

 

Garvin

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On 4/26/2017 at 5:11 PM, Garvinque said:

I will try this recipe this weekend starting Saturday and cooking on Sunday.

Sourdough Pizza Crust:

 

400 Grams KA all purpose flour

50 Grams Sourdough Starter- Whole Wheat

7 Grams of Salt

280 Grams of Warm Water

Hoping for a 70% Hydration with this formula, mix everything together until well incorporated cover and let sit for 18hrs. Make dough balls after the 18hr fermentation cycle and either let rise a second time and use or place in fidge for additional 48hrs. Any suggestion's is welcome.

 

Garvin

 

You would need 315 grams of water for a 70% hydration assuming that your sourdough starter is 50/50 flour and water by weight.

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  • 2 months later...
On 4/12/2017 at 6:16 PM, John Setzler said:

I added the photos of the Biga process to the original post.  I am curious about one thing though... Since I am modifying a 70% hydration recipe to a 60% hydration recipe, I wonder if the biga process will be affected by that in any way.  As I dissected the recipe in the book, one interesting thing I noticed was that the Biga was 66% hydration and the final dough ingredients were 74% which would balance out at 70%.  My biga hydration is 56% and the final mix add in will be 64% to balance out at 60%.  

 

In theory, I could make the biga whatever hydration I want as long as my final dough ends up where I want it to be.  I don't know if it would benefit from more or less hydration... or suffer by the same token.

 

@Mewantkj @ckreef - thoughts?

Try this... use 1/2 of the flour in your recipe then mix in an equal weight of water. Put in  a tablespoon of your sourdough starter. Mix everything together, cover your mixing bowl and let it ferment overnight or about 16 hours. 

 

The next day mix in the other 1/2 of your flour and the weight of water that will give you the 60% hydration you want. Stir it together, cover it, and then let it autolypse for 30 minutes. 30 minutes later add your salt, sugar or oil... whatever your recipe calls for. Mix it all together to a shaggy mass and let it autolypse for 30 minutes. 

 

Because your hydration rate is so low you probably want to use slap and folds to develop the gluten and then shift to stretch and folds. Forkish likes to fold his dough but he usually makes much higher hydration bread dough. 

 

Finish your mixing process and either bake it after the final rise or put it in the fridge overnight to retard the fermentation. I go overnight if I planned ahead. 

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

The best pizza dough I have ever eaten. In Brazil, we are not have the habit of eating pepperoni like the US and Canada, the pepperoni flavor here is not as heavy as in North America. I particularly prefer the Brazilian pepperoni. But we can use imagination and use a multitude of toppings. Thank you for sharing your incredible recipe.

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  • 1 month later...
On April 12, 2017 at 6:16 PM, John Setzler said:

I added the photos of the Biga process to the original post.  I am curious about one thing though... Since I am modifying a 70% hydration recipe to a 60% hydration recipe, I wonder if the biga process will be affected by that in any way.  As I dissected the recipe in the book, one interesting thing I noticed was that the Biga was 66% hydration and the final dough ingredients were 74% which would balance out at 70%.  My biga hydration is 56% and the final mix add in will be 64% to balance out at 60%.  

 

In theory, I could make the biga whatever hydration I want as long as my final dough ends up where I want it to be.  I don't know if it would benefit from more or less hydration... or suffer by the same token.

 

@Mewantkj @ckreef - thoughts?

 

John, it's been 2+ years since that post - have you continued to use this 60% Biga recipe and have you ever experimented with the Biga hydration to answer your own question.

 

My first pizza cook was with a 60% hydration version of Forkish's 24-48 Hour Pizza Dough but I'm planing to try a 60% hydration version of his Biga recipe similar to yours this weekend.

 

Forkish's 70% Biga recipe was (66%+74%)/2 = 70%

Your 60% Biga variant was (56%+64%)/2 = 60%

 

The 60% Biga option I was considering before running into this thread was:

 

(60% Biga + 60% Dough) / 2 = 60%

 

Have you continued to use this recipe?  

 

Do you still consider it worth the extra effort?  

 

Have you stuck with 56%/64% or settled on something different?

 

Any advice as to whether I should stick to the 56%/64% you describe here, try 60%/60%, or go with something different appreciated.

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1 hour ago, John Setzler said:

@fafrd

 

the hydration doesn't affect the process.  I don't use this recipe any more.  I never do anything that runs longer than 24 hours now and I mostly do doughs that are aready in 2 to 3 hours start to finish.

 

Thanks for the response and good to know if I try a Biga, I don't need to worry about Biga hydration levels between 56% and 66%.

 

We were very happy with the results using Forksh's 24-48 Hour Pizza Dough for which he states:

 

'This is one of the best doughs in this book.  The long fermetation helps give the pizza crust a very tender lightness, and the airiness of the cornione is just... wow.'

 

Compared to what he states for his 48-to-72-hour Biga Pizza Dough:

 

'It creates one of my favorite pizza crusts in this book in terms of flavor and texture...  The pizza crust from this dough bakes with an earthy flavor and a delcate texture.  The rims hold with some nice poofiness, open holes, and a perfect crispness.  The flavors include layers of retrogusto, a deep wheaty aftertaste that mates well with pizzas baked with a bit of char on the crust."

 

I have to admit it was that las statement in bold which is the only reason I was attracted to trying this Biga recipe (at 60%).

 

Did your experience with this Biga recipe result in any noticable difference in taste associated with this 'retrogusto' and the 'deep wheaty aftertaste' that Forkish refers to?

 

Have you ended up sticking to simpler/quicker dough recipes because:

 

-there really didn't prove to be any noticable difference when cooked at 900F?

-there was a difference but not one you really liked?

-you liked the difference but not enough to justify the extra hassle/effort?

 

I'm planning a second 900F pizza cook this weekend and can either make 6 balls of the 60% 24-hour we liked so much last time or 3 balls of 60% 24-hour and 3 balls of 48-72-hour Biga.

 

Your advice would be appreciated - is the contrast between these two doughs worth exploring/experiencing or am I better off just stickng to the 24-hour we've already tried (and liked) and just focus on getting my levels of charring down to typical levels? (had a bit too much charring in our first attempt last weekend, thogh the pizza was still good).

 

Here is a pic of top side and bottom side charring with 24-hour 60% Forkish dough cooked at 900F (probably actually higher because I only measured in the center of the pizza stone which extended 3/8" beyond the heat deflector, so the stone was probably hotter as it got closer to the edge.

E2CBBB61-B747-471D-A633-409A1E4E99AA.jpeg

2E85C731-8490-4433-932D-42BCD848DA25.jpeg

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