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afingerhut

Bootleg Joetisserie

21 posts in this topic

I found that my Joetisserie Jr. setup did not allow me to regulate temperature well enough on my Big Joe.

 

I got myself a 1 1/2"x 1/8"x 8' flat aluminum bar and made a ring to seal the gap. With a bit of nomex gasket I'm able to maintain temps much better. Still needs some more testing, but thought I'd share with y'all. It's a workable solution for those that don't want (or have) $250-300 to spend on the authentic experience. Also will work for those who don't have a Kamado that is 18" or 24".

 

70ebf19ae56fe75843e3419d27b1228d.jpg

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WOW!! That is straight up brilliant.  It looks at least possible to get that shape with out a machine to make circles out of flat stock.  Then using pins to index the angle is a nice solution. So are the pipe fittings for the  bushing.

 

Nice home made adaption of the wedge shaped solution for a rotisserie on a kamado.

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WOW!! That is straight up brilliant.  It looks at least possible to get that shape with out a machine to make circles out of flat stock.  Then using pins to index the angle is a nice solution. So are the pipe fittings for the  bushing.
 
Nice home made adaption of the wedge shaped solution for a rotisserie on a kamado.


Yes, the copper tees are to support the weight of the dome and give the spit a round surface to turn on. I'm looking for something a tad closer fitting to let the dome close just a little more. That will reduce the gap left to fill with gasket material.

Fairly simple to form the ring with basic tools. Saw, clamps, drill and tap. I tapped and screwed the ends of the band together and cut them flush.

The metal was about $20 from Home Depot and the rotisserie was about $40 on amazon. Looking forward to putting some more miles on it.
Marty likes this

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Is there a gap in the front when the lid is closed?   And if there is, would a wider (higher) piece of strap metal close that gap up?

dlboerger likes this

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Is there a gap in the front when the lid is closed?   And if there is, would a wider (higher) piece of strap metal close that gap up?


There are slight gaps. I'm working to lower the lid a little further to eliminate some of the slack. Nomex gasket should take care of the rest

A wider piece of aluminum might work, but I'm so close with where I'm at, I don't want to go buy another $26 of aluminum to find out. I also don't know if the wider piece would have more difficulty being set in at an angle. The back of the ring has to be right at the felt line to have enough room to close.
Marty and BURGER MEISTER like this

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Did some more testing tonight and was able to hold 250, 275 and 300. Once I add some more gasket material it should be even easier yet.

John421 likes this

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EXCELLENT!  

 

I have done similar myself in the past as an experiment and as a prototype on my Big Joe.  

 

Some ideas for you...

 

If you place the spit rod orientation "diagonally" with the motor at the left rear between the table and the hinge (aligned with the nuts that hold the table bracket) and the handle on the right front similarly over the bracket nuts you should be able to open and use the side tables - it all depended on the slant/tilt clearance you can get at the rear in conjunction with the internal ring and how much the lid is up in the front.  I had turned down my rod diameter in the rear on the small side.  That is what I did when I was prototyping. Something to look at anyway.

 

If you take the spit rod where it passes through the gaskets and using a file, round off the rod (remove the squareness) for a width equal to the thickness of the bowl side across the gasket area it will turn much easier.  Using a drill carefully supporting the other end of the rod (someone to help is handy) you can make quick work of turning down the spit rod to a nice round shape.  Just  don't get carried away on drill speed. Or turn it down past when it just gets round.  Some pre-work to initially file down the square corners is a good start before using the drill.  I mark off the area to turn with a wrap of blue painters tape on each side.  You could use rotisserie motor but it really turns too slow.

 

As for a sleeve bearing, the rod if 5/16 is probably after rounding between 3/16 and 1/4 inch - closer to just under 1/4 inch - so you take a thin but sturdy piece of metal (like from a piece of copper pipe as it is workable) and form/shape it loosely around the rounded part and that is your sleeve bearing.   I also found out you can use it just riding the round rod on the felts with no sleeve as a small groove worn in the gasket (always using the ring/spit in same orientation) is negligible. In that case the turned down rod portion should extend inside Joe just past the ring in a slit cut just big enough for the rod and just deep enough to align with the top of the Kamado wall.  This keeps the rod from walking.  But a bearing sleeve of some type is a good idea. It just adds to the thickness.  

 

NOTE: Because of the weakened rounded area compared to the square you need to properly support the rod (i.e. pick it up with two hand) from both ends (preferably to the inside of the rounded portions) when loaded with heavy food to prevent bending/breaking it.   

 

These ideas might or might not be applicable to your overall setup.  Give it a ponder while sitting next to Joe with a beer...

 

.

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Wow, what an excellent mod DIY project.  it's great looking.  how did you mount/secure the rotisserie motor?   More pictures?    This gives me a great idea to try on the Akorn I just acquired.

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Ok more questions... how did you get the ring so round?  can you provide pictures showing how you secured the ends?

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Wow, what an excellent mod DIY project.  it's great looking.  how did you mount/secure the rotisserie motor?   More pictures?    This gives me a great idea to try on the Akorn I just acquired.


I will be working on it again this afternoon and will try to take some pictures then. I just used a F clamp to attach the mounting bracket on top of the folded shelf.

Akorn would be much easier as it metal so you could just screw a mount to the body. However, my experience with Akorns is that they are very sensitive to airflow so temps might get away from you more easily.
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Ok more questions... how did you get the ring so round?  can you provide pictures showing how you secured the ends?


I first cut it to the approximate length with a little overlap. Then I bent it inside the base by hand using clamps to secure it as I went. Once I was happy with the fit I drilled and tapped 2 holes to secure the ends of the ring together. I screwed in the stainless 10-32 machine screws and cut the screws flush with the outside of the ring.

I'm planning to turn the holes into slots so the ring has a bit of play in it so I can 'spring fit' it inside the rim. That will give me some room for gasket material and allow easier installation and slack for expansion.
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EXCELLENT!  
 
I have done similar myself in the past as an experiment and as a prototype on my Big Joe.  
 
Some ideas for you...
 
If you place the spit rod orientation "diagonally" with the motor at the left rear between the table and the hinge (aligned with the nuts that hold the table bracket) and the handle on the right front similarly over the bracket nuts you should be able to open and use the side tables - it all depended on the slant/tilt clearance you can get at the rear in conjunction with the internal ring and how much the lid is up in the front.  I had turned down my rod diameter in the rear on the small side.  That is what I did when I was prototyping. Something to look at anyway.
 
If you take the spit rod where it passes through the gaskets and using a file, round off the rod (remove the squareness) for a width equal to the thickness of the bowl side across the gasket area it will turn much easier.  Using a drill carefully supporting the other end of the rod (someone to help is handy) you can make quick work of turning down the spit rod to a nice round shape.  Just  don't get carried away on drill speed. Or turn it down past when it just gets round.  Some pre-work to initially file down the square corners is a good start before using the drill.  I mark off the area to turn with a wrap of blue painters tape on each side.  You could use rotisserie motor but it really turns too slow.
 
As for a sleeve bearing, the rod if 5/16 is probably after rounding between 3/16 and 1/4 inch - closer to just under 1/4 inch - so you take a thin but sturdy piece of metal (like from a piece of copper pipe as it is workable) and form/shape it loosely around the rounded part and that is your sleeve bearing.   I also found out you can use it just riding the round rod on the felts with no sleeve as a small groove worn in the gasket (always using the ring/spit in same orientation) is negligible. In that case the turned down rod portion should extend inside Joe just past the ring in a slit cut just big enough for the rod and just deep enough to align with the top of the Kamado wall.  This keeps the rod from walking.  But a bearing sleeve of some type is a good idea. It just adds to the thickness.  
 
NOTE: Because of the weakened rounded area compared to the square you need to properly support the rod (i.e. pick it up with two hand) from both ends (preferably to the inside of the rounded portions) when loaded with heavy food to prevent bending/breaking it.   
 
These ideas might or might not be applicable to your overall setup.  Give it a ponder while sitting next to Joe with a beer...
 
.


Thanks for the suggestions. I'm trying to avoid modifying the spit rod as I also intended to use on my joe Jr.

With a little bit of gasket on I should be in really good shape. Looking forward to some test cooks.

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Did my first cook with the gasket material on. Held temp great, and even was able to reduce temp when I was done with my ribs.

Still not tight enough to shut it down with the rotisserie in place, but I've got a couple more gaps to seal.

a57433754dec459fab6451856e83dc48.jpg

TKOBBQ, rchang72 and Marty like this

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Did my first cook with the gasket material on. Held temp great, and even was able to reduce temp when I was done with my ribs.

Still not tight enough to shut it down with the rotisserie in place, but I've got a couple more gaps to seal.

a57433754dec459fab6451856e83dc48.jpg


Another cook on the Bootleg Joetisserie tonight. Was able to seal well enough to snuff out my charcoal and had excellent temp control across the range

b6adb845ac33b1473f088061948662bf.jpg
Marty likes this

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