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    • By Daz
      Finally I got around to finish this idea I had for a long time, ever since I made the pizza ring. I picked up a set of Weber Rotisserie and lathed part of the shaft round to fit the Akorn. I cut two little "V" on the pizza ring and the drive motor sits perfectly on top fo the side table - lucked out on that one! The chickens were marinaded with Hawaiian Huli Huli Sauce for two days, with some Hawaiian Salt Seasoning, freshly ground pepper and they turned out amazing. I gotta thank my neighbor who worked at a construction site and got me a tuck load of dried out Kiawe wood. It burns really hot and long lasting. I'm starting to put a kit together and will report back on the progress.
       
       
    • By ndg_2000
      Hi
       
      I have just got my rotisserie attachment sorted out for the kamado
       
       As I have not cooked with a rotisserie before I was looking for tips/cooking temperature advice for a whole chicken as a starter so I can get a feel for it. 
       
      Also some other cooks that a rotisserie is well suited for.
       
      Thanks in advance 
      Nigel 
    • By wallawu
      I'm throwing my annual Daytona 500 party Sunday and I grabbed 5 racks of baby backs at $2.68/lb.  Boneless ribeye is on sale for $7.98/lb, so I'm planning on trying out the new rotisserie stand I got for Christmas over an easy cinder block pit I'm going to set up with a 7-8 lb rib roast.  Never rotisserie'd anything before, so this could be a disaster.  A few questions for each...
       
      There will be a lot happening at once, so I'd like to get more done during the prep than during and after the cooks.  I'm wondering if cutting the ribs into sections--or even individually as this article suggests https://www.smoking-meat.com/august-13-2015-pre-slicing-ribs-before-smoking-them--has been a success for anyone.  My thoughts are smoke them for about 2 hours, put them all in an aluminum pan or two with some juice/sauce and rub covered for another 2, then take the top off the pans to finish them off for a bit.  After that I can just set the pans out and let people have at it.  This works beautifully with beef ribs, but I've never tried it with pork.  It sure would save me time and aluminum foil during the cook.  It will also keep anyone from grabbing too many and throwing meat away.
       
      As far as the prime rib on the rotisserie,  I'm planning on lighting a good base of coals topped with hickory logs I have and letting that dwindle down to a hot heap of coals.  Should I offset the roast a little with a pan underneath with some water in it to use the juices?  If so, I may be able to use our fire pit.  I think this will be a 5+ hour process, so I'm sure I'll have to add coals.  Since it'll be boneless, do I need to tie it with string or wire, or will the forks suffice?  This is going to be an experiment for sure, so I'm glad I'll have the baby back-ups.  Any open flame rotisserie experts out there?  As always, thanks for the help!
    • By philpom
      Breakfast Sausage
       
      This spice blend would work equally well for pork or beef, I used beef of the 80/20 variety.  The more fat the better.
       
      1.5 pounds of ground meat
      3 ts dried sage
      1 3/4 ts salt
      3 ts dried basil
      1 ts ground black pepper
      2 ts onion powder
      1/2 ts dried marjoram
      1 ts crushed red pepper
      1 1/2 ts fennel seed
       
      Combine spices only in a small bowl and mix them.  This helps make sure you get even distribution in the meat.  Then put the meat in a bowl and spread 1/3 of the spices and mix with hands until incorporated, then another 3rd, mix and finally the rest of the spice blend.  Ball the meat, cover it tightly and place in the fridge for 24 hours to allow the flavors to develop.  Next day form the meat in to 2 oz balls and press to 3/8" thick.  Grill, pan fry or roast until done and enjoy!
    • By odamaK
      So, I got my Joetisserie and began to look for a replacement motor in case after a year my motor failed. The joetisserie motor is .model RM-A101, and conveniently enough Onlyfire has the exact same model number motor that looks identical. Here is the link on Amazon for Canada, same item would be for the USA. 
       
      https://www.amazon.ca/Universal-Replacement-Stainless-Rotisserie-Aftermarket/dp/B00X7RKFWG/ref=asc_df_B00X7RKFWG/?tag=googlemobshop-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=293002225578&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1174210165666426299&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9000793&hvtargid=pla-502873780552&psc=1&th=1
       
      I ordered by both, and the stainless is going back, it does not match for reasons below. 
       
      Now this says it's rated for 20lbs and is 4 watts just like the Kamado Joe one except the kamado Joe says 50 lbs. which I find odd. 
       
      Also the stainless steel one on Amazon is a RM-A201 and the bolt pattern does not .match the Kamado Joe plate if you have to swap plates. 
       
      The description says it has anti backlash gears.
       
      It's not stronger for those looking for more power but this will allow you to swap adaptor plates and have a backup motor in case your motor dies during a spin possibly and this will get you back up and ruunnig. It's cheap insurance.  
       
      Can't upload photos from where I am but will try later. 
       
      Oh the joetisserie cord is longer. 
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