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Smoke - What You Need to Know


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8 hours ago, JABF99 said:

 

Would this also work if smoking at a low temp smoke (like for smoking fish/salmon) where the dome temp is kept at or under 170-degrees?  Would you still get a good smoke?  This smoking with a Kamado Joe is all new to me.  But I do like your idea of using the small dutch oven for the wood chunks.  Most of my smoking though, will be for fish and vegetables.  Not all, but most.

 

 

It's not my idea but thank you :) To answer your question, I guess it really depends on how you build your fire. If there is enough fire to heat the wood inside then it would work. If you are building a small fire and the wood inside the dutch oven doesn't get hot enough then it will not give off smoke.

 

Have you looked into pellet trays such as the "A-MAZE-N Pellet Smoker?" It is a good way to get great smoke at low temperatures.

 

I hope that helps and maybe someone else will have a better answer.

 

Happy Cooking

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On 5/16/2019 at 5:47 PM, T Yelta said:

 

 

It's not my idea but thank you :) To answer your question, I guess it really depends on how you build your fire. If there is enough fire to heat the wood inside then it would work. If you are building a small fire and the wood inside the dutch oven doesn't get hot enough then it will not give off smoke.

 

Have you looked into pellet trays such as the "A-MAZE-N Pellet Smoker?" It is a good way to get great smoke at low temperatures.

 

I hope that helps and maybe someone else will have a better answer.

 

Happy Cooking

 

Thanks for your help, and others here who have helped me with the questions that I have had about various things these past couple months as a newbie to kamado cooking.  After experimenting with the smoke question I had, I realized I was "over thinking" this and I don't need to have a container for my hardwood.  It seems to be working fine just placing the wood on the coals... at least it is working fine for me.

 

I did read a lot before my kamado arrived and it was a great help preparing me for learning to cook this way.  But in hindsight I realize there is no substitute from just jumping in and actually cooking on the grill.  I've had failure and successes, but throughout it all I have learned a lot by doing.  I now feel comfortable with the smoke part of it all.  And I'm having a lot of fun with the overall cooking on the new grill (it's a Big Joe III).  It's a fun journey as I am cooking a lot now on the grill... I'm newly retired and so I have the time to relax and cook often outside on it.  

 

Thanks (to everyone here) who have helped me get started.  I had no clue when I began with the new grill and now I feel more comfortable with the basics anyway.  I just had to jump in and start grilling :-)

Edited by JABF99
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  • 7 months later...

Smoke cooking for flavor is something I like to do...... Just a light smoking that provides more of a "hint" than a  heavy flavor.  The technique I've used a couple of times now is to sous vide to MR, the freeze solid.  The frozen meat goes into the kamado with smoke.  As it is already cooked, cooking is not part of the equation.   I like to do this at 250-350.   I operate on the TLAR system (that looks about right), and when I'm satisfied, I pull it out cover, and let rest.  A meat thermometer would be more scientific, but cannot be inserted into frozen  meat, so would have to be inserted late in the process.  

     The results have been excellent without exception so far, as moisture loss is kept to a minimum...........

 

                                                    H.W.

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  • 2 weeks later...

    I don't see anybody using my favorite source of smoke.    I love the flavor imparted by fresh green creek bottom willow twigs with the bark on.   These are NOT willow trees such as golden or weeping, etc, they are the brush that grows in damp and wet areas, such as #### willows.  I use these for a light smokey flavor when cooking, rather than serious smoking. Most recently I did a rack of prime ribs this way, and a lamb roast.  both were pre-cooked to medium rare, and put on the kamado frozen, and the ribs  were cooked until up to eating temp.    The idea is to create a surface smoke as a seasoning.    The lamb roast was refrozen for later use, so I didn't worry about core temp.   This was done at a low indicated temp.....  around 200.    The lamb was used on New Year's Day dinner, along with the pecan cheesecake pie I described in the dessert section.   We sliced and very briefly steamed the thawed lamb on a wire rack in a skillet to bring it up to temp without cooking it further or drying it out.  It was very delicious, and popular.   Nobody there had ever had lamb smoke cooked.

 

                                                                                  H.W.

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  • 3 weeks later...
10 minutes ago, Z mann R2 said:

I have a question about throwing aluminum foil wrapped chunks into the fire. Wouldn’t this give off metal fumes into your meat? Especially when doing those high heat steak fires you mentioned??

 

I dunno.  If that idea doesn't work there are cast iron smoker boxes you can buy.

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On 1/9/2020 at 5:51 PM, ckreef said:

What about fresh herbs in a foil pouch for smoke. I really should do this more often as I have a large (3' x 4') rosemary bush that could use a little trimming these days.

 

I've done this with allspice berries as a cheaper substitute for outrageously expensive allspice wood, and in the past with some pulled pork experiments. IMO it works but not as well as just adding the ingredient to the product in most cases, though it does seem to work better the more minty/menthol-y the herb. Rosemary cutting smoke on chicken sounds great.

 

Edit: IIRC I soaked allspice berries and bay leaves in foil packets to make smoke for jerk chicken. Smelled great, but not much impact to the final product flavor.

Edited by Ogopogo
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  • 3 weeks later...

Just my $0.02 worth the level of smoke can also be changed by the charcoal you use . I find that Royal Oak puts more of a smoke flavor to chicken than Rockwood does ( wife doesn't care for smoked chicken ) I think then smoke flavor is stronger for the Royal Oak because it isn't cooked as much as the rockwood and has more volatiles left in it . That's also why Rockwood is a lot lighter and has a more musical sound when dumping out of the bag.But rockwood wont get as hot as Royal Oak for steaks or Johns pizza recipes.Had my kamado joe for a little over a year and it has been a interesting learning curve with smoke. I've had offset and gas smokers  before.. But never a gas grill, only charcoal grills.The curve is easier if you keep a log book of what works and doesn't work.

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  • 11 months later...

Thanks for the informative video, John. Sometimes, I will use more than one type of wood on a cook. For instance, I might smoke a brisket with a chunk of hickory to start off, but then transition to something like a couple chunks of apple as the cook goes along.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Why is there such a thing as too much wood when smoking on a kamado? When using an off-set smoker you would never say a person used too much wood for their cook as wood might be the only fuel used for the whole cook. If the wood burns clean then I would think there is no such thing as too much wood. 

 

Pertinent to the question above, what is the difference between combustion in an off-set smoker compared to a kamado? In an off-set my understanding is that you want lots of oxygen in the cook chamber to get complete combustion of the wood in order to get clean smoke. In this thread it appears that getting wood to smolder instead of catch fire is the goal and that too much oxygen might be a bad thing. Is that why you can add too much wood to a kamado? Even though we think we have clean smoke is it not clean enough?

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 2/9/2021 at 7:56 PM, Damien said:

Why is there such a thing as too much wood when smoking on a kamado? When using an off-set smoker you would never say a person used too much wood for their cook as wood might be the only fuel used for the whole cook. If the wood burns clean then I would think there is no such thing as too much wood. 

 

Pertinent to the question above, what is the difference between combustion in an off-set smoker compared to a kamado? In an off-set my understanding is that you want lots of oxygen in the cook chamber to get complete combustion of the wood in order to get clean smoke. In this thread it appears that getting wood to smolder instead of catch fire is the goal and that too much oxygen might be a bad thing. Is that why you can add too much wood to a kamado? Even though we think we have clean smoke is it not clean enough?

 

An offset smoker is nothing like a kamado.  Wood isn't smoldering in an offset smoker.  Its ignited and burning with a visible flame.  It's a small hot fire.  In a kamado it's smoldering.  Smoldering wood produce a very acrid smoke that will ruin your food if used too heavily.  This is why a cook on a kamado will only need a few ounces of wood while a cook on an offset requires adding full splits to the fire every 30 to 45 minutes.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/2/2021 at 9:01 AM, John Setzler said:

 

An offset smoker is nothing like a kamado.  Wood isn't smoldering in an offset smoker.  Its ignited and burning with a visible flame.  It's a small hot fire.  In a kamado it's smoldering.  Smoldering wood produce a very acrid smoke that will ruin your food if used too heavily.  This is why a cook on a kamado will only need a few ounces of wood while a cook on an offset requires adding full splits to the fire every 30 to 45 minutes.

 

 

I am enjoying the transition from my offset smoker to my Kamado Joe Classic I !!! I got real tired of adding wood to it every 30 to 45 minutes like you said, and this will make my chunk smoking wood last a long time.

I have a good stash right now of Cherry, Oak and Hickory. I'm thinking I want to try some grape vine chunks. Here in SC where I am we have tons of wild muscadine vines, some in the 2-3 inch diameter size I may have to harvest some and try it. Anyone try grapevines?

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