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SailorDan

I have a Traeger, but need a grill - kamado?

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I really enjoy my Traeger and plan to keep it, but I need a grill.  Is a kamado type grill overkill?

 

I'm primarily looking for higher heat and the ability to sear.  Despite the convenience of gas, I'm leaning towards charcoal for higher heat and the "fire" experience.

 

I don't need the low slow capability of the kamado grill, but they are catching my fancy more than a charcoal kettle grill.  I'm thinking about Costco's Pit Boss.

 

 

Should I just save $400 and get a Webber kettle?  Or is a kamado an experience not to be missed?

 

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

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Tough call bro. If all you looking for is a quick sear save dough and go with a kettle. If you could convince yourself to try the whole kamado kooking experience get the pit boss. A kamado is a lot more than a quick sear. If I were you, I'd commit to a kamado. I'm not you, and if you have no need for something other than a quick sear device, save some dough.

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If you have only one thing that is high heat sear, then get a Weber. The primary benefit of a kamado is that it is a jack of all trades. But because you want only a single use, the kettle is more than adequate.

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Given your situation I'd also suggest a weber
If you've already got a decent Traeger you probably wont see any additional benefit to owning a Kamado over a Kettle

 

If you can justify the additional cost, I'd get the Kamado because you never really know how much youre gonna use something til you own it, but as many have already said, I'm not you

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I suspect once you had a kamado you'd be using it for a lot more than just searing but you won't know for sure until you get one. A weber kettle or even a tabletop grill like a Thuros T1 makes a great searing station. not forgetting a kettle is also a very versatile cooker just not as good as a kamado IMO. 

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A kamado is addictive simply because it yields great cooks when you need smoked meats, grilled steaks, chops, etc.  A kamado acts as an (convection) oven, it braises, bakes, etc.  quite simply, a kamado is a complete replacement for your kitchen oven and so much more.  

 

The Pit Boss is a really nice kamado for the price.  You can spend a lot more on a grill,and not get as much.  Get the kamado and you'll see.

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I dipped my toe in with a vision. In the month I have had it I have cooked more than the entire last year. I was an avid smoker, but the kamado is like the Swiss army knife of cookers. I am so happy with it, I sold my smoker and gave my 7 burner gasser to my FIL. I'm never looking back, in fact, by next summer. A Big Joe may join the stable for bigger get-togethers

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If you're sure that you don't want to try the kamado experience then I would just get a weber kettle and call it a day. It'll do whatever you want as far as cooking burgers, searing etc. A kamado will do all of that and a lot more, but at the moment it doesn't sound like you are interested in an all around cooker so the kettle would likely be your best bet. I will say that if you have any inkling (I expect you do or you wouldn't be asking about them) to give a kamado a try, I'd just go out and get one of the cheaper one's. If you think it's overkill sell it while it's still in like new condition and you should recoup a lot of your money.

 

To me an Akorn Jr sounds like a perfect little Kamado for your needs. It runs around what a full size (I think) weber kettle does but will out perform it as long as you don't need to cook a ton of food at a time. I will give a disclaimer though, a Weber kettle is likely to last you 20 years even if left outside uncovered, the Akorn will not. However it is small enough and light enough that it wouldn't be hard to find somewhere to store it inside, which would extend its lifetime quite a bit. But it's your money, do with it as you feel best, just trying to think of ideas that would work for your particular situation and the Akorn Jr instantly popped into my head.

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Thank you for all of your input.  I think I am too intrigued by the kamado to be happy with a kettle, so even though I have a smoker, I'm probably going to grab a kamado.  

 

Any regrets with difficulty maintaining two zone heat?  I've heard it is a kamado short coming, but less of a challenge on a kettle.

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I too had a weber kettle, 4 over the last 40 years.   They would burn out or rust out, one thing or another.    Decided to get a kamado and see what all the fuss was about.   So to accompany my GMG DB, I got a Pit Boss from Costco.   I can get the Pit Boss down to some pretty low temps for cooking low and slow but not as low as the DB.   Do I have the best of both worlds?  No.  But I've not spent upwards of $12,000  to achieve what I deem as good eats either. 

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21 minutes ago, SailorDan said:

Thank you for all of your input.  I think I am too intrigued by the kamado to be happy with a kettle, so even though I have a smoker, I'm probably going to grab a kamado.  

 

Any regrets with difficulty maintaining two zone heat?  I've heard it is a kamado short coming, but less of a challenge on a kettle.

 

Two zone heat on a kamado isn't much different than on a kettle, assuming they are of near equal size. Same principal essentially, hot coals on one side and toss in a deflector. Over a period of time though once the kamado is heat soaked the cool side will run around the same temp as the hot side, it will just be indirect heat. Unless you need a pretty big temperature difference it's still very manageable on a kamado though. It's something that most say the Primo Oval kamado's excel in, I've never used one so I can't comment on the difference but it does make sense due to the shape of the kamado. That said, unless you need a fairly large difference in temperatures per zone you will be able to do the same with a kamado as you could a kettle, maybe even better depending on what accessories you have.

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@SailorDan - I've never had any trouble getting two zone in a kamado.  That's easy.  Believe me when I say this, but a kettle has absolutely nothing on a kamado.  Nothing.  

 

Get a kamado and get on with cooking great meals.  You'll never regret it.

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