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First overnight low and slow...


GS1397
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Others may chime in but I've done 8-10 pounders and put them in around 10:pm...they're usually done by 8:am the next morning...ya might be going in too soon and it'll be finished around 5:am possibly unless that's what you're shooting for.


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Here you go... woke up at 06:30 and it was around 160 with the grill holding steady around 245. I pulled it about 10 when it hit 195. Its now foiled and towel wrapped in a cooler until we get back from lunch errands. Looks good anyway. I'll let you guys know how it tastes when I pull it this afternoon...
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Hey, GS, that looks superb. Would love to compare notes with you, as I've just put my first slow and low Boston butt to rest in the cooler, as well. Put it in last night at about 11 p.m. (after bringing the Big Joe down from 500F from NINE pizzas!), and took it off almost 14 hours later. Smells wonderful, and it was so tender that it fell into two pieces when I was lifting it off the grill!

 

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We don't like sweet sauces, so will be experimenting with an Eastern Carolina vinegar-based one, a tomato-based one (both shared from this forum by other generous souls) and my own whisky sauce. We'll let me partner sample all three versions and we'll take a vote on which goes the best. Seriously, though, the smell of the thing is so great that I don't think you could find a sauce that wouldn't work! Just because this is a hickory smoked meat, I think I'll use an Islay scotch for my whisky sauce... possibly the Laphroaig Quarter Cask. Lemme know how yours works out and what you sauced it with. Cheers, Buddy.

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Hey guys, thanks for the likes. 

 

I pulled mine a little while ago after being in the cooler for about 3 hours. It pulled very easily and had a great smoke flavor to it. However, there were some parts that still didn't seem to be as moist and weren't as tender. Don't get me wrong, it was still good and tender, but not as much as I thought it should be. I had a drip pan filled with apple cider vinegar and water. Any ideas??

 

I agree, with the ability to smoke these things the way we can with a Kamado, sauce really becomes an afterthought. Even using the Jack Daniels rub I found at Wal-Mart, the bark and smoke flavor was fantastic.

 

thanks again...

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@GS1397 - what was the drip pan filled with water Nd vinegar supposed to be doing?  Please don't misunderstand me, I'm not trying to be critical, but if it was to add moisture to the system and preserve the moisture in the cook, it would seem that it didn't work particularly well.  I've never used a water pan in years and years of kamado cooking and never had a dry product.  A water pan is a carry over when employing very drafty cookers like stick burners, bullets, kettles, etc.

 

What were the parameters of your cook, i.e. temp of the kamado, temp of the cook when you pulled the cook off the grate, length of cook, how long did you cooler the cook, etc.?  If we know these things we maybe could diagnose why parts of your cook were drier than you liked.

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Hey guys... thanks for the info and comments.

The pan was mainly for a drip pan so that the drippings wouldn't burn. I added the vinegar to the water just for flavor/aroma. Last time it was a bit dry so I added more liquid to the drip pan to help. The cook was between 235-260 for the whole time. I took it off the grill at around 193, wrapped in foil and then put in my small RTIC for about 3 hours...and for the most part It was moist and tender, but it just seemed like there were some parts deep in there that weren't... maybe it's just me!! [emoji3]


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...and in my case, I also used a large pyrex casserole/lasagne dish filled to about 1/4" with water only, sitting on top of four 1/2" copper Ts as spacers on top of the deflectors. I read that a drip pan (with or without water) will prevent the drippings from creating acrid smoke, and using separators under the drip pan will keep the pan itself cooler, again to avoid acrid smoke from the drippings. I smoked a 9 lb. butt at ~225-240 for almost 14 hours, used three chunks of hickory and two chunks of oak, removed it at 197F, and to my taste, it came out perfect. I double-wrapped it in foil, covered with a towel in a cooler for four hours afterwards. I was anticipating using a couple of forks to pull it, but the meat was so tender and moist, it fell apart in my hands. In fact, I was able to pull out the remaining pockets of fat that hadn't rendered during the cooking, and there was a nice amount of bark to nibble at, too. The really fun part was the saucing. I made three sauces (see thread above), but the star was the whisky one. I used an Ardbeg, which is a heavy-duty smoky, peaty brand of single malt -- about 2-3 ounces of it in a garlic-laced pepper sauce, and combined with the pulled pork, it exploded with flavour in our mouths! My wife, who has to leave the room when I open a bottle of Ardbeg, because she finds the smell so offensive to her non-whisky drinking sensibilities, asked for seconds of this! :-D Here are the first two sandwiches I served:

 

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The one on the left has the Ardbeg sauce, and the one on the right has a tomato-tequila sauce that was good, but was hopelessly outclassed by the whisky sauce beside it! This is one time leftovers are NOT gonna be a problem!

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2 hours ago, GS1397 said:

.Hey guys, thanks for the likes. 

 

I pulled mine a little while ago after being in the cooler for about 3 hours. It pulled very easily and had a great smoke flavor to it. However, there were some parts that still didn't seem to be as moist and weren't as tender. Don't get me wrong, it was still good and tender, but not as much as I thought it should be. I had a drip pan filled with apple cider vinegar and water. Any ideas??

 

I agree, with the ability to smoke these things the way we can with a Kamado, sauce really becomes an afterthought. Even using the Jack Daniels rub I found at Wal-Mart, the bark and smoke flavor was fantastic.

 

thanks again...

 

 

Based on your first and second post I suspected you might be too focused on time and temp. You pulled at...what 10 hrs when it hit 195.

 

easy fix. Don't use IT or time to determine if it's time to pull it. Use IT as a guideline for when to start probing. Don't pull unless probe tender. I.e. The thermometer slides in like going into warm buttah. When it hits that point you will know. There will be no doubt. It will be like hitting a hole in one. 

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@GS1397 - your cook was nowhere near done at a temp of 193F.  That would explain why some areas weren't moist/tender.   Low-n-slow cooks generally are done in the temp range of 200-205F.  I always probe my cooks beginning at about 197F to test for doneness.  You probe in several spots and it should feel like warm butter, i.e. very little resistance to your probe.  

 

Adding liquid to a drip pan in a kamado does absolutely nothing but make you think you're doing something.  Indeed, you're doing something, but it won't help your cook.  You're better off just keeping the lid to your kamado shut.

 

As for burning your drippings, water isn't the answer.  All that does is dilute what you're trying to preserve.  Instead, put 4 copper plumbing tees under the corners of your drip pan.  This gets your drip pan up off the heat deflector (you are using a heat deflector on each low-n-slow cook, right?).  When you set your drip pan directly on a heat deflector, the drippings are exposed to high temps as they are sitting on a very hot heat deflector.

 

 

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I was using the Vision heat deflector and had my drip pan on the bottom rack and the butt on the top rack. I'm doing another one in a couple of weeks and will cook it longer...however it did probe very easy when I took the temp in various places... oh well this is only #2 so we will see how #3 does...

 

 

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1 hour ago, GS1397 said:

I was using the Vision heat deflector and had my drip pan on the bottom rack and the butt on the top rack. I'm doing another one in a couple of weeks and will cook it longer...however it did probe very easy when I took the temp in various places... oh well this is only #2 so we will see how #3 does...

 

 

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Ok, I'm glad you probed for tenderness. I will say I have never ever had butter like tenderness at 193 or 197. Usually it's north of 200. If you did, that's great. All pigs are not created equal. However, I think it may e possible your definition of "like buttah" and mine are off a bit.    When it's done it will "literally", not figuratively, be like warm butter.

if you experienced that in low to mid 190s great, if not, they say patience is a virtue. Wait the hog out. 

 

If if you think it's tender, but not like butter...not done. When you like OH CRAP...this is like buttah, you know you done.

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