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21 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, prowe said:

Those look incredible. I have no clue what 6kg or 130c means, but I'm sure it translates loosley to "big pile of tasty meat". 

Yes, you nailed the translation.  In that regard, the ribs resemble the chef :-D 

 

6kg is about 14lb.  2.2kg to a lb.

130C -  http://lmgtfy.com/?q=convert+130c+to+farenheit

 

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27 minutes ago, Tioga said:

I wish I had your butcher.

NO!!!! HE'S MINE - ALL MINE!!!!!!!

 

Good butchers are getting harder & harder to find.  Most of there here in Oz do pre-packaged meat from some central uber-slaugherhouse, so choices are very limited.  This one still gets full carcasses shipped in, make their own sausages & cured meats, and carve up their own cuts of meat.

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On 7/17/2017 at 3:39 AM, KamadoJosephine said:

"have no Argentinian roots, but I did see some stuff on TV about them (or maybe it was Brazil or Canada, but I figure they're all pretty much the same place).  So I went to my fave butcher and it turned out that one of the butcher-dudes Mum is from Argentina"

 

I grew up in Argentina.  You are a lucky guy, cause I miss those ribs.  It's what we call "tira de asado."  Here in Texas, where we live, the closest I can get is at a Mexican Meat Market, but they are one third the size and low quality meat.     Jealous!!!! ;)

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